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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

FOR REFERENCE 



Do Not Take From This Room 



ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1998 
ANNUAL REPORT 



I 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



1998 ANNUAL REPORT 



^^S§/^ 




PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO TAKEN AT ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK 
COURTESY OF ANDOVER RESIDENT SUZIE CLARKE 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



1998 Accomplishments 6 

Animal Inspection 57 

Ballardvale Historic District Commission . . 88 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Community Development & Planning 23 

Building Division 23 

Conservation Division 26 

Electrical Inspection 24 

Health Division 27 

Planning Division 32 

Plumbing & Gas Inspections 24 

Zoning Board of Appeals 33 

Community Services 34 

Directory of Committees & Boards 188 

Directory of Department/Division Heads ... 192 

Division of Elder Services 39 

Finance & Budget 12 

Assessors 13 

Central Purchasing 13 

Collector/Treasurer 15 

Information Systems 15 

Veterans Services 15 

Financial Statements 91 

Fire Department 45 

Gr. Lawrence Technical School 86 

Housing Authority 89 

How to Reach Elected Officials 196 

How Can We Help You? 193 

Human Resources Department 73 

John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund 90 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 90 

Memorial Hall Library 48 

Plant and Facilities Department 58 

Building Maintenance & Electrical/Mechanical . 59 

Forestry 61 

Municipal Buildings 62 

Parks & Grounds 60 

Spring Grove Cemetery 61 

Vehicle Maintenance 61 

Police Department 51 

Animal Control 53 

Detective Division 52 

Emergency Management 53 

Operations Division 51 

Records Division 52 

Preservation Commission 87 

Public Works Department 65 

Engineering 65 

Gr. Lawrence Sanitary District 68 

Highway 66 

Sewer 68 

Solid Waste 67 

Water 67 

School Department 70 

Town Clerk 37 

Town Counsel 22 

Town Manager 114 

Town Meeting Minutes 115 

Tr. Punchard Free School 91 

We Would Like To Hear From You 197 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1998ando 



,f^m^ TOWN OF ANDOVER 






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Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover. MA 01810 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 

In 1998 the Town of Andover witnessed a changing of the guard on several fronts: Jerry 
Silverman retired from the Board of Selectmen and was replaced by Lori Becker, Richard E. Neal 
retired as Superintendent of Schools and was replaced by Dr. Claudia Bach, James L. Bamford retired 
as Superintendent of Parks, Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry and was replaced by John D. O'Donnell, 
Jr. and James F. Johnson retired as Chief of Police and was replaced by Brian J. Pattullo. 
Congratulations to Lori, Claudia, Jack and Brian! 

The $29. M Andover High School Addition and Renovation Project was completed in May. 
The facility is the centerpiece of a state-of-the-art educational and community resource and campus. 
It is used seven days a week by students and residents alike. The school has the capacity to 
accommodate 1,700 students in a fully modern and renovated 300,000 square foot building. 

Highlights of this building include: 

A new Science wing and enlarged Media/Library area, a new field house, a new lobby and 

additional specialized classrooms. 

In the original 1967 building, new windows have been installed and lighting, ceilings and 

flooring replaced. 

A new Fine Arts area and new labs for language arts, computers and the sciences. 

New and renovated play fields, a new varsity baseball diamond and last but not least, at 

Lovely Field a renovated running track and two new pressboxes. 

Many important infrastructure and building projects were in the design/development, 
engineering or study phase during 1998. 

The sewer expansion program in the South Main Street, Ballardvale Road and Rogers Brook 
areas was engineered and designed with the goal of construction starting in 1999. 

• The Public Safety Center was subject of an architectural feasibility study and it was 

determined that it was not feasible to do an addition and renovation to the existing facility. 
The architect recommended the demolition of the existing 23,000 square foot building and 
the construction of a new 46,000 square foot facility on the same site on North Main Street, 
that would better serve the needs of the Police and Fire Departments in the years to come. 

-1- 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



The School Committee undertook a review of their plan to build a new middle school and 
reconfigure the grade structure for the elementary and middle schools grades. After a six 
month study period they voted not to change the grade structure and to build a 564 student 
elementary school and a new 450 student middle school on the available land in West 
Andover at Cross Street and High Plain Road. 

• The Council on Aging and their committees were active during the year working on the site 

selection process for a new Senior Citizen Center. Proposals were requested for potential 
sites, several were received and studied and after much analysis, the Council on Aging 
selected Williams Hall on the Phillips Academy campus. The Friends of the Andover Senior 
Center have started a fundraising campaign to raise the money necessary to fund the 
renovation and addition work necessary to turn Williams Hall into a senior facility. 

The Town applied for and received a S2.5M Urban Systems Grant from the Massachusetts 
Highway Department to improve pedestrian and vehicular safety along Main Street in 
downtown Andover. The consulting engineer designed the improvements which included 
new sidewalks, handicapped accessible curbcuts, drainage, curbs, repaving, coordinated traffic 
signalization, etc. These plans were presented to the Town in November. At year' s end, they 
were submitted to the Massachusetts Highway Department for their review. Also, the Annual 
Town Meeting in April approved $400,000 to begin a sidewalk restoration program in the 
downtown, Ballardvale and Shawsheen neighborhoods. 

In the Spring, the Youth Services, School Department and Plant and Facilities Department 
worked together to construct a Skate Park on the tennis courts behind the West Middle School. The 
Park was open on a temporary basis for eight weeks during the Summer. It was an overwhelming 
success! With this in mind, the School Department and the Town worked together to permanently 
keep the Skate Park on that site. Modifications to the site were started in the Fall and after they are 
completed the Park will be re-opened in 1999. 

The Planning Board's consultant presented their long-awaited study entitled "An Evaluation 
of the Fiscal Impact of Residential Development in the Town of Andover". Their results indicated 
that there was no correlation between residential development and the tax levies in the Town. They 
did find, however, that residential parcels cost the Town $1.06 for every dollar they pay in real estate 
taxes while commercial and industrial parcels cost 700 for every dollar they pay in real estate taxes 
and open space costs 400 for every dollar they pay in real estate taxes. They recommend that the 
Town improve data organization. To that end, the Town embarked on a Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) Project. The GIS project is an information management tool to manage, collect, 
analyze and share geographic-based information across all Town departments via the computer. One 
of the greatest benefits of this project will be the ability of Town departments to better serve the 
public through improved access to geographic-based information. 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover 
Page Three 



As you have read, the Town of Andover and its various boards and departments were active 
during the year of 1998 planning for major infrastructure and building improvements for the future. 
The Annual Town Meeting is the place where the future of Andover is decided. Please plan to 
participate in the Annual Town Election on March 23 rd and at the Annual Town Meeting on April 26 th 
and 27 th which will take place at the Field House and on May 10 th and 1 1 th which take place at the 
Collins Center all on the campus of Andover High School. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



VISION STATEMENT 

The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its legacy of democracy 
shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasure of nature, history, individual 
respect, neighborhood and learning. As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the 
past will be enriched in the present for those yet to he. 



Andover Board of Selectmen 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-82 



00 






TOWN OF ANDOVER 



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Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover. MA 01810 
(508)623-8200 

Dear Citizens of Andover: 

The Town Election in March of 1998 resulted in John Hess being welcomed back as a 
member of the Board of Selectmen. Lori Becker was also elected and became the newest member 
of the board. On behalf of the board, I would like to thank the outgoing member, Jerry Silverman, 
for his many years of faithful and dedicated service to the Town of Andover. 

One of the first important actions during 1998 was the replacement of Police Chief James 
Johnson who retired after 18 years as Chief. The Town was fortunate to have the Board of 
Selectmen approve the appointment of Brian J. Pattullo, a long-term member of the Andover Police 
Department, as Police Chief. Many residents, employees and officials came to the swearing-in 
ceremony, at Old Town Hall, to celebrate with the new Chief. 

The Town also saw the retirement of several other long-term employees: William Douty (45 
years), Richard Merola (36 years), Joseph Hastings (34 years), John Milne (32 years), John O'Leary 
(31 years), Aime Reming (28 years), Virginia Caswell (28 years), John Lewis (27 years), John 
Houlihan (27 years), Steven Avery (27 years), James Bamford (25 years), John Aulson (19 years), 
Robert Mason (18 years), Judith Melanson (15 years), and Emmanouel Tsiknopoulos (14 years). 
These men and women should be recognized for their years of dedicated service to the Town. 

The official business of the Town was conducted at the Annual Town Meeting in April at the 
new Andover High School Field House. Another year has passed, fiscal year 1998 is behind us and 
fiscal year 2000 is quickly approaching. Over the past year, the board has actively pursued and 
accomplished many of its commitments to the Town and its citizens. Andover residents are now able 
to, once again, enjoy the Collins Center and its cultural events. The major renovations to the High 
School were completed, along with the construction of a new field house. There are still many 
projects to tackle in 1999. 

Each year, board members have been involved in many workshops and seminars in order to 
keep abreast of the latest developments in the many facets of local government. These workshops, 
together with all the other duties and responsibilities of members of the board, are extremely time 
consuming. I would like to commend the other members of the board for their unselfish commitment. 
This commitment, along with the diversity present on the current board, has made the Board of 
Selectmen successful in dealing with the challenges it has faced during 1998. 



Citizens of Andover 
Page Two 



Town employees, along with the volunteers on the many Town boards, have also provided 
unselfish commitment in their duties. The residents can reap the benefits of having a diversified and 
talented group of individuals who keep the Town operational on a day-to-day basis. The many 
functions of local government proceed successfully because of this dedicated workforce. 

Lastly, the residents themselves should be commended for their interest in and support of the 
Town of Andover and its local government. Like the members of the board and other Town 
employees, the residents of Andover are a very diverse group of people with many varied, and 
sometimes conflicting, interests. Although it is sometimes a challenge to try to represent all interests, 
it is the interaction, involvement, participation and cooperation between the citizens and Town 
government that help make Andover a truly great place to live. 

As this year's Chairman of the Andover Board of Selectmen, it is an honor to represent this 
Town and its citizens, and to submit this letter for the 1998 Annual Report. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William T. Downs 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER. ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



^ggms TOWN OF ANDOVER 



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MEMORANDUM 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 

(508)623-8200 TO Board of Selectmen 




FROM: Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manage, 

SUBJ: Accomplishments for 1998 

DATE: December 31, 1 998 



This memo highlights some of the major accomplishments of each department for calendar year 
1998. The items described represent a sampling of what we consider to be the most significant 
achievements of the year. 

Finance and Accounting 

• Finance and Accounting Software . All Town and School finance staff worked on selecting new 
Finance and Accounting Software Application. Prepared payroll data for conversion to new 
software package. 

• Bond Issue . Issued over $ 1 1 million in debt at one of the lowest interest rates in history at 3 . 8%. 
Moody's continued Andover' s Aal bond rating, the second highest rating possible. Only 14 
cities and towns in Massachusetts have a bond rating of Aal or higher. 

Pension Fund Returns . The retirement system earnings were 24.48% on investments versus a 
statewide average of 18.69% ranking Andover as 8 out of 107 retirement systems in the state. 

• Year 2000 Project . Coordinated interdepartmental Year 2000 Compliance project. After 
educating ourselves as to the scope of the problem an inventory of computer systems and other 
equipment with potential Year 2000 problems was completed. Final phase now underway to 
evaluate all critical systems and bring failing systems into compliance prior to January 1, 2000. 
Information Systems : 

► Established wide-area network which connects personal computers in Police Department, 
Fire Department, Library, Public Works and Town Offices and provides email and 
Internet capability. 

► Improved and expanded Town Web Site. New material includes Selectmen agenda, 
Town Meeting information, including the Warrant, and updates to the Assessor and 
Town Clerk pages. 

► Upgraded PCs for Y2K compliance. 

Assessor's database . Assessor's office implemented updated software and hardware system to 
provide improved public access to information. Touch screen computers were installed at 
counters. 

• Past due taxes . Treasurer's office significantly reduced tax title past due real estate taxes. 



Conservation Division 

Purchased 28 acres of land and accepted gift of 12 acres of land in the Sunset Rock Road area 

(Jenkins Estate). 

Purchased 68 acres of land surrounding Foster's Pond for conservation. 

Planning Division 

Completed Geographic Information System (GIS) needs analysis and pilot project. Commenced 

Base Map update and development of town- wide GIS system. 

Completed Open Space & Recreation Plan update and received written conditional approval 

from Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. 

Completed the first comprehensive rewrite of zoning by-law for earth work regulations in more 

than 20 years. The new by-law was adopted at the 1998 Annual Town Meeting. 

Developed first comprehensive zoning by-law for Wireless Communications Facilities such as 

cellular towers. This by-law was also adopted at the 1 998 Annual Town Meeting. 

Planning staff spent considerable time and effort reviewing three proposed hotel developments 

all of which were subsequently approved by the Planning Board. 

Drafted and adopted major amendments to Subdivision Rules and Regulations dealing with 

private ways, paper streets, and plan requirements. 

Health Division 

Implemented personnel reorganization plan 

Expanded Hepatitis B immunization program to High School seniors. 

• Inspected each licensed food service facility at least twice in 1 998 for the first time in three years. 

• Created computerized data base for tracking Title V (septic system) inspections, repairs, and 
replacements. 

Building Division 

Christopher Clemente was appointed in October as the Local Building Inspector. 
1, 167 building permits were issued in comparison to 1, 1 78 last year. 

► 140 commercial/industrial building permits were issued which was the same as last year. 

► 68 single family home building permits were issued in comparison to 78 issued last year. 

Town Clerk 

Successfully planned and carried out State election, Town Election, an Annual Town Meeting 

and a State Primary that included a sticker campaign. 

Created computerized forms for issuing vital records and a data base for licensing information. 

• Developed several database reports which allows for a more efficient response to requests for 
census and voter registration information. 

• Microfilmed historic Town Clerk records for preservation and helped set up microfilm programs 
in the Treasurer's Office and Accounting Department. 

Prepared written guidelines to help new committees understand how to organize as a public 
committee and to clarify their responsibilities with regard to the Open Meeting Law. 



-7- 



Division of Community Services 

Offered a variety of new year-round recreational and educational programs. Over 200 classes 

were offered to over 1,900 individuals - 107 classes were at full capacity enrollment. The most 

popular adult program was Swing Dance. 

More than 1,500 people were enrolled in sports programs during any one season. During the 

summer months, more than 1,400 children participated in a DCS program every week. 

Revenues from youth sports programs and activities exceeded $200,000 which included a new 

after-school swim and play program. 

Expanded the concession menu at Pomps Pond due to the purchase of a new oven. Pomps Pond 

is now handicapped accessible with two sand wheelchairs and parking lot improvements. 

Partnered with other Town departments to develop programs with the Police Department, 

Memorial Hall Library and Town Clerk. 

Served over 1,500 pancake breakfasts at the annual July 4 th Celebration in the Park. 

Youth Services 

Andover Community Skate Park . On July 1 1, 1998, history was made in Andover with the 
opening of one of the finest skate parks in the nation, the Andover Community Skate Park. The 
AYS organized skateboarders and helped them secure funding for the park through Town 
Meeting and was responsible for the construction, maintenance, and daily operation of the park. 
In seven weeks, from midday to sunset, over 1,400 skaters soared, ollied, and enjoyed an 
opportunity to pursue the sport they love. People of all ages came down to the park to watch the 
skaters, listen to bands, talk about the weather, and enjoy the atmosphere at the park. 

• Venture Out Summer Program . Over a thousand young people participated in diverse and 
challenging activities. The eight-week program offered a wide variety of trips, adventures, and 
services that attracted the interest of middle school students. 

After-School Programs . Youth Services provided many after school opportunities for middle 
school students that included: rock climbing, street hockey, mountain biking, skate trips, outing 
club trips, and a basketball clinic. 

• Lacrosse . Youth Services continued to expand the sport of lacrosse in Andover by implementing 
a winter lacrosse clinic and five teams into competitive play during the spring season. Friends of 
Andover Youth Lacrosse was established and raised $15,000 to provide the foundation for 
Andover High's first lacrosse team next spring 

Winter Activities - The White Mountain Snowboard Camp premiered in 1998 offering middle 
school students an opportunity to improve their skills though instruction by sponsored riders. 

Division of Elder Services 

• Received national acclaim for the innovative "Aging is an Adventure" program which is a joint 
project with Andover High School. 

Successful transition of the food/nutrition program from the School Lunch Program operated 
by the School Department to the Senior Center Nutrition Program operated in-house. 
Staff installed a computerized In-take Program to better track seniors in need of services. 
Several partnerships were started - one with the Andover High School SPED Program and the 
other with Merrimack College. The SPED Program students shopped and provided community 
services to the elderly. The Merrimack College partnership involved participation in college 
courses. 



• Created an innovative English is a Second Language program with Jewish Family Services 
focusing on recent Russian/Eastern European immigrants. 

• The Council continued to work on the planning and development of a new Senior Center. 

Memorial Hall Library 

• Completed major technology initiatives, including rewiring the entire library, designing and 
implementing an NT network, installing a customized public menuing system, setting up PC 
based email and connecting to the Town via the I-Net. 

Greatly expanded Internet and CD-ROM/DVD information services to the public. 

► Configured our network and computers for fast Internet access via MediaOne. 

► Installed new PC workstations with Internet connections in the Library. 

► Expanded Internet access to include the Children's Room, including CR home page. 

► Provided Internet access to seniors by upgrading 6 PCs in the Senior Center Drop-in 
Center at Old Town Hall. 

► Improved remote access services to library users by creating online capability to reserve 
library items across library home page. 

Strengthened cooperative relationships with schools by producing reading lists for the elementary 
and middle school students, planning young adult programs with the middle school PAC and 
initiating a Young Adult Advisory Board for planning activities for middle school students. 

• Started collection of English as a Second Language materials for library users who are working 
to improve their English skills. The Friends of the Library carried out a second year of 
"English as a Second Language Conversational Groups." 

Department of Plant and Facilities 

School Projects 

High School construction punch list and close out completed. 

New High Schooltrack, press boxes and bleacher seating upgrade projects bid and completed. 

New fuel tanks installed at Shawsheen and West Elementary Schools. 

Two new modular classrooms installed at Sanborn School. 

HVAC upgrades completed at Bancroft, West Elementary, Doherty and Sanborn Schools. 

Rebuilt chimney at West Middle School. Removed old chimney at West Elementary School. 

Carpet and flooring replacements completed at Collins Center, West Elementary, West Middle and 

South Elementary Schools. 

ADA upgrade and compliance projects completed at multiple locations. 

Oversaw construction of new irrigation systems for the play fields at South and Sanborn Schools 

Renovated old SHED modular classrooms at Shawsheen School. 

Town Projects 

Skate Park constructed. 

• Roof replacements completed for sections of the Memorial Hall Library and School Administration 
Buildings. 

• Rebuilt exterior stairs and pavers at the Memorial Hall Library, Townhouse and Town Offices 

• HVAC upgrades for parts of the Town Offices and Town House were completed. 

• New wood flooring installed at Town House function hall. 

• New carpet installed at Memorial Hall Library. 

• ADA compliance projects completed at Town Offices, Memorial Hall Library and Public Safety 
Buildings. 

-9- 



Ballardvale Green irrigation system installed. 

Town-wide tree survey and Downtown tree inventory completed. 

Year 2000 compliance inventory completed. Assessment of inventoried systems underway. 

Senior Center flooring and kitchen upgrade projects completed. 

Town- wide water treatment systems repaired. 

Town Yard fuel monitoring system installed. 

Updated computerized work order and energy management systems. 

Jack O'Donnell was hired to replace the retiring Jim Bamford as Superintendent of Parks, Grounds, 

Cemetery and Forestry. 

Department of Public Works 

Water Division 

• EPA and Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) water quality monitoring was completed 
in accordance with the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) with no violations. 
The laboratory staff scored 1 00% in the S W04 1 performance evaluation administered by the United 
States Environmental Protection Agency. This evaluation is based upon the qualifications of 
personnel and its performance in on-site inspections. 

Engineering Division 

• Work was completed to estimate, quantify and prepare documents for the reconstruction and 
resurfacing of 57 Town roads totaling 16.3 miles in length. 

• 2,490 feet of new sewer mains were designed and constructed on Reservation Road, Mayflower 
Drive, Standish Circle and Miles Circle. Survey and design work was performed for future sewers 
on Balmoral Street and Rock O'Dundee Road. Preliminary design work was also completed for 
the planned sewer extensions for the South Main Street Area, Ballardvale Road Area and Rogers 
Brook Area. 

3,970 feet of exiting sidewalks were designed and reconstructed on Center Street, Oak Street, 
Marland Street, and Moraine Street. 

• 3,000 feet of new water mains installed. 

• The design, construction layout and inspections were performed for the installation or repair of 3,870 
feet of storm drains at the following locations: Livingston Cir., Montclair Ave., Governors Dr., 
Virginia Rd., Bradley Cir., Jenkins Rd., Center St., Langley Lane, Chestnut St., Rogers Brook West, 
River St., and Larchmont Circle. 

• Inspections and tests were performed on 1 5 new subdivisions and site developments including: 6,000 
feet of sewer mains; 17,121 feet of water mains; 10,547 feet of drain lines; 2.6 miles of new 
roadway; 4,370 feet of new sidewalks; 10,955 feet of granite curb and berms; 88 new Gas Co. 
excavations including 3875 feet of new mains on Juliette St., Wolcott Ave., Walnut Ave., High St., 
and Frontage Rd. 

Work was also performed to complete and accept the following streets: David Drive, Colonial Drive 
and Patriot Drive. 

FY 1998 Recycling Statistics : 



Material 


Tons Collected 


Steel/tin containers 


7 


Glass 


431 


Paper 


2,213 


Plastics # 1 and #2 


39 


Aluminum 


5 



•10- 



Fire Department 

Developed and implemented an accountability system for firefighter safety in accordance with the 
National Incident Command System. This system enables command staff to track and direct every 
individual involved in a fire or other incident. Andover's system is being used as a model by other 
fire departments in the region. 
Fire Prevention Division moved entirely into Town Office to enhance one stop permit process. 

• Trained Firefighters in the use of the following newly acquired equipment: 

► New ladder tower truck 

► Large diameter hose and hydrant assist valves 

► Automatic Heart Defibrillators 

*■ Epi-pens have been placed on all ambulances. 

Continued fire safety education in both the public and private grammar schools with emphasis 

during Fire Prevention Week culminating in its annual Open House in October. 

Police Department 

• Brian J. Pattullo was appointed Chief of Police in March and he made changes to the command 
structure and specialty assignments following four additional retirements including former Chief of 
Police James F. Johnson. 

• Community Outreach . Three new community outreach programs were established this year as part 
of an ongoing effort to create a closer bond between Andover residents and the Police Department. 
A two officer bicycle patrol was well received during the warmer months of the year. An Explorer 
program was developed uniting the youth in the community with various members of the 
Department. A citizen police academy was established to help residents become more familiar with 
the Police Department. 

• Grant awards . The Police Department received several grants this year. $60,000 in Community 
Policing funds were awarded to upgrade computer equipment and investigative equipment. An 
extension of a Fast Cops grant provided $15,000 to offset part of one officer's salary. The 
Governor's Highway Safety Bureau awarded the Town $5,000 for enforcement of motor vehicle 
laws regarding speeding, seatbelt and operating under the influence. 

• Technology Upgrades . The internal computer network was expanded allowing Internet access and 
email exchange with other Town departments. A computerized accounts payable system was 
implemented allowing greater information sharing among members of the Department for budgeting 
purposes. An additional speed monitoring and tracking unit has been acquired to aid in traffic 
enforcement. 

Traffic Calming . The Department has utilized various traffic calming techniques in an effort to 
maintain the quality of life in town neighborhoods. 

Board of Selectmen. 

And last but not least, Jerry Silverman retired after 1 8 years of service to the Town and Lori Becker 
was elected to replace him! 



RSS/pjs 



-11- 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 1999 Budget was released on February 6, 
1998. During the months of February, March, and April approximately twenty meetings were held 
with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On April 16, 1998 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1,300 households. 
The Annual Town Meeting was held on April 27, 1998 and the Fiscal Year 1999 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $79,932,208. This budget was an increase of 6.1% from 
the fiscal year 1998 operating budget of $75,305,961. 

Some of the department's major accomplishments for 1998 are as follows: 

• Town and School staff worked together on selecting a new finance and accounting 
software system. As 1998 drew to a close, Town and School employee payroll 
information was converted for the new payroll system effective January, 1999. 

• With the approval of the Board of Selectmen the department prepared a bond issue 
of over $1 1 million for various capital projects. Moody's Investors Service continued 
Andover's Aal bond rating (the second highest rating possible). Only 14 
Massachusetts municipalities have a bond rating of Aal or higher. The lowest 
competition bid on the bond issue was awarded at 3.8% interest rate, the lowest 
interest rate in recent history. 

The Department coordinated the interdepartmental Year 2000 Compliance project. 
Educational workshops were held with staff to explain the potential problems; a town- 
wide inventory was compiled of computer and embedded systems; vendors were 
contacted; and corrective actions have begun and continue. 

• The Information Systems division established a +100 user local-area and wide-area 
network which connects personal computers in Police, Fire, Library, Public Works 
and Town Offices and provides e-mail, file sharing and Internet access. 

• Town's web site: www.town.andover.ma.us expanded. New material included listing 
of all public meetings; Board of Selectmen agenda; 1998 Town Meeting Warrant; 
Community Services Winter 1998 Course catalogue; Frequently Asked Questions; 
and Town Clerk and Assessor's special information pages. 

-12- 



Staff performed evaluation of the Town' s options regarding the purchase of electricity 
in the newly deregulated electric market. The Board of Selectmen approved the 
recommended supplier in the Fall. First year savings are estimated to be in excess of 
$70,000. 

The Assessor's office implemented an updated software and hardware system to 
provide improved public access to property information. Touch-screen public access 
terminals were installed at the counter for our residents' use. 

The Collector/Treasurer's office continues to significantly reduce tax titles past due 
real estate taxes. On June 30, 1995, approximately $2.7 million was outstanding in 
tax titles. As of June 30, 1998, this delinquent amount had been reduced to 
approximately $1.6 million and as 1998 drew to a close, has dropped to 
approximately $1 million. In addition, the Collector/Treasurer became a Certified 
Massachusetts Municipal Treasurer after passing a comprehensive examination. 

The Purchasing office initiated new forms to assist departments in soliciting price 
quotations, emergency purchases and sole source procurement. In addition, the 
Purchasing Agent passed a series of examinations and was awarded her certification 
in Design and Construction Contracting. 



ASSESSOR 



The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuation of all real estate and personal property 
items in the Town. The Board hears appeals in these two categories along with motor vehicle excise. 
The Assessors are also responsible for the awarding of nearly 350 property tax exemptions on an 
annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, widows and 
widowers, and individuals classified as blind. 

The Board of Assessors also conducts revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amounts of property and ownership related information 
that is available to the general public. More than 1 ,000 requests for public records and information 
are received and processed on an annual basis. Some of the highlights for 1998 are as follows: 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 1998 the Central Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,898 purchase orders and 
6,988 requests for payments for the Town, and 3,975 purchase orders for the School Department. 
During this period there were approximately 67 bids and 12 requests for proposals which were 
advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts available to 
cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 1998 Andover has initiated a number of Cooperative Bids as well as participated 
in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 

-13- 



in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the bidding process. Some of 
the items purchased were: paper products for copy machines, police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, 
fuel oils, vehicle fuels, elevator services, electrical services, office supplies equipment & furniture, and 
school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 1998 were: 

Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal System (CAMA) 

Highway Rock Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Geographic Information Systems-Needs Analysis and Implementation Plan 

Purchase and/or Lease of Refurbished and/or New Modular Classrooms 

Repair and Improvement of Stage Rigging System - Collins Center 

Miscellaneous Road Materials 

Athletic Equipment 

Cafeteria Paper Products 

Hardwood Flooring & Carpeting - Andover Town House 

Video Modulation Processing Equipment 

Stair Renovations - Andover Town Offices 

Erecting of Press Boxes at Andover High School 

Water Chiller Replacement at Old Town House 

Library Delivery Services 

Vehicle Gasoline & Diesel Fuel 

Roadway & Sidewalk Reconstruction - Center Street 

Computer Equipment for Town of Andover 

Carpeting for Memorial Hall Library 

Granite Stair Repair - Memorial Hall Library 

Fire Hose for Andover Fire Department 

Janitorial Supplies 

Television & VCR Equipment for Andover Public Schools 

Bleacher Plank Replacement - Andover High School Lovely Field 

Complete Floating Dock System for Poms Pond 

Removal & Replacement ofPortions of Roofing at Library and School Administration Offices 

Addition to Plant Facilities Shop at Red Spring Road 

New Generator at Doherty Middle School 

Boiler Controls Upgrade for Bancroft Elementary School 

AHU Controls Upgrade for Town Administration Building 

One Forestry Bucket Truck 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for administering the contract compliance 
of Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as the insurance coordination and risk management for 
all Town and School Departments. Health and personal insurance, however, is handled by the Human 
Resources Department. Central Purchasing handled numerous casualty and property claims over the 
year. Approximately 19 claims were handled resulting in $62,257.79 being recovered for the Town 



■14- 



COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Some of the highlights for 1998 are as follows: 

• Collected and processed several old outstanding tax title accounts. 

• Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills and payments as 
well as 30,000 excise tax bills and payments. 

Borrowed $1 1,200,000 at a record low rate of 3.933 1%. 
Helped to maintain Andover's high bond rating of Aal . 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for hardware, software and computerized 
data used in municipal operations including financial records, word processing documents, electronic 
transmission and other varied electronic files. This division supports all users of the network and 
strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government. Highlights for 1998 include. 

Upgraded PCs for Y2K compliance. 

• Established wide-area network which connects personal computers in Police Department, Fire 
Department, Library, Public Works and Town Offices and provides email and Internet 
capability. 

Improved and expanded Town Web Site. New material includes Selectmen agenda, Town 
Meeting information, including the Warrant, and updates to the Assessor and Town Clerk 
pages. 

• Purchased and began implementation of new Financial Management Software and participated 
in associated training. 

VETERANS SERVICES 

The Veterans Services Division provides or coordinates financial, administrative, medical and 
logistical assistance to Andover's over 3,000 veterans and their families. Since July 1, 1998 the 
Veterans Office has responded to inquiries or requests from over 400 local veterans and has provided 
direct financial assistance for fuel, food, burials, medical and personal needs to twelve families. The 
Town receives reimbursement from the State for 75% of the funds provided to local veterans under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

In addition, the Office also plans and coordinates all patriotic observances on Veterans Day 
and Memorial Day and annually places over 2,000 flags on veterans' graves in Andover. Band 
concerts and other civic commemorations are also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

Statistically, forty-three (43) Andover veterans died during 1998; thirty (30) were World War 
II Veterans, eight (8) Korean Veterans, and five (5) Vietnam Veterans. 



■15- 



TOWNOFANDOVER 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 

ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 



PROPERTY 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 1998 


FISCAL 1997 


TYPE 


#ACCOUNTS 


ASSESSMENT 


#ACCOUNTS 


ASSESSMENT 


#ACCOUNTS 


ASSESSMENT 


Single Family 


8,144 


$2,319,521,250 


8,100 


$2,131,037,500 


8,051 


$2,097,830,800 


Condominiums 


923 


$83,313,500 


923 


$78,127,100 


921 


$77,918,400 


Multi-Family 


381 


$127,390,300 


389 


$120,503,400 


393 


$124,232,100 


Vacant Land 


625 


$44,289,900 


671 


$46,259,600 


752 


$50,889,700 


Other Residential 


134 


$12,710,650 


132 


$11,284,800 


134 


$11,519,900 


Commercial 


258 


$283,628,027 


262 


$210,993,647 


249 


$199,866,092 


Industrial 


142 


$280,834,100 


147 


$264,225,700 


156 


$269,810,300 


Miixed Use 


191 


$253,707,800 


197 


$228,654,100 


184 


$201,173,500 


Personal Property 


367 


$67,487,130 


356 


$65,035,210 


348 


$58,689,120 


Total Taxable 


11,165 


$3,472,882,657 


11,177 


$3,156,121,057 


11,188 


$3,091,929,912 


Total Exempt 


895 


$349,735,800 


896 


$312,965,800 


900 


$306,534,200 


Total All Property 


12,060 


$3,822,618,457 


12,073 


$3,469,086,857 


12,088 


$3,398,464,112 



ANNUAL MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TOTALS 
CATEGORY 1998(1) 1997 



1996 



1995 



1994 



# Commitments 

# Bills Issued 
Total Excise Tax 



(1) 1998 figures as of 3-1-1999 



ANNUAL EXEMPTION TOTALS 



7 


10 


10 


10 


8 


31,214 


31,259 


30,624 


29,429 


30,623 


$3,739,780 


$3,439,963 


$3,135,663 


$2,903,930 


$2,603,788 





FISCAL 1998 




FISCAL 1997 


FISCAL 1996 




TYPE 


# ISSUED 


AMOUNT 


# ISSUED 


AMOUNT 


# ISSUED 


AMOUNT 


Widows/Widowers 


69 


$20,006 


66 


$18,997 


68 


$21,672 


Veterans 


179 


$84,713 


184 


$73,311 


188 


$78,909 


Blind 


21 


$14,495 


25 


$18,094 


19 


$16,349 


Seniors 


65 


$50,057 


65 


$49,286 


64 


$50,542 


Deferrals 


5 


$13,009 


9 


$25,985 


9 


$23,403 


Hardship 


1 


$1,026 


1 


$1,004 


1 


$1,013 



Total Exemptions 340 

ANNUAL ABATEMENT REQUESTS 



$183,306 



350 



$186,677 



349 



$191,888 



FISCAL YEAR 


# REQUESTS 


NOTES 


1995 


238 




1996 


230 




1997 


437 


(revaluation year) 


1998 


117 




1999 


169 





■16- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 

TEN TOP TAXPAYERS 







TOTAL TAXABLE 


TOTAL TAXABLE 










PROPERTY 


REAL 


PERSONAL 


TOTAL TAXABLE 


TOTAL TAX 


PERCENT OF 


TAXPAYER NAME 


TYPE 


PROPERTY 


PROPERTY 


REAL ESTATE 


ASSESSED 


TOTAL LEVY 


1 ) Andover Mills Realty Ltd. Partnership 


Commercial 


$64,149,500 


$0 


$64,149,500 


$1,391,947.97 


2.397% 


2) Raytheon 


Industrial 


$49,160,300 


$1,000,000 


$50,160,300 


$1,088,444.94 


1 874% 


3) Hewlett-Packard Company 


Industrial 


$43,349,300 


$0 


$43,349,300 


$942,413.78 


1.623% 


4) Genetics Institute, Inc. 


Industrial 


$32,010,500 


$0 


$32,010,500 


$695,908.27 


1.198% 


5) Lincoln Andover LLC (Putnam Investments) 


Commercial 


$27,853,100 


$0 


$27,853,100 


$605,078.32 


1.042% 


6) Gillette Company 


Industrial 


$26,760,500 


$0 


$26,760,500 


$581,773.27 


1 .002% 


7) Massachusetts Electric Co. 


Ind/Utility 


$1,560,900 


$22,957,060 


$24,517,960 


$526,873.56 


0.907% 


8) Eisai Research Institute 


Office/I nd 


$23,308,300 


$0 


$23,308,300 


$506,722.44 


0.872% 


9) C A Investment Trust 


Resd/Comm 


$27,044,300 


$337,850 


$27,382,150 


$499,731.89 


0.860% 


10) New England Tel. & Tel. 


Ind/Utility 


$7,253,900 


$14,407,900 


$21,661,800 


$470,927.53 


0.811% 




Total 


$302,450,600 


$38,702,810 


$341,153,410 


$7,309,822 


12.585% 




Grand Value 


$341,153,410 











FIVE ADDITIONAL TOP TAXPAYERS 







TOTAL TAXABLE 


TOTAL TAXABLE 










PROPERTY 


REAL 


PERSONAL 


TOTAL TAXABLE 


TOTAL TAX 


PERCENT OF 


TAXPAYER NAME 


TYPE 


PROPERTY 


PROPERTY 


REAL ESTATE 


ASSESSED 


TOTAL LEVY 


Interstate/GCL Partners LP (Andover Marriott) 


Commercial 


$18,246,100 


$1,039,230 


$19,285,330 


$419,263.07 


0.722% 


Digital Equipment Corp. 


Industrial 


$17,308,949 


$0 


$17,308,949 


$376,296.55 


0.648% 


Vicor Corp. 


Industrial 


$16,372,700 


$0 


$16,372,700 


$355,942.50 


0.613% 


One Hundred Minuteman LP 


Commercial 


$14,972,200 


$0 


$14,972,200 


$325,495.63 


0.560% 


Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 


Commercial 


$13,829,600 


$490,000 


$14,319,600 


$311,308 10 


0.536% 




Total 


$80,729,549 


$1,529,230 


$82,258,779 


$1,788,306 


3.079% 




Grand Value 


$82,258,779 











FIFTEEN TOP REAL ESTATE ASSESSMENTS 



TAXPAYER NAME 



TOTAL TAXABLE 

PROPERTY REAL 

TYPE PROPERTY 



PERCENT OF TOTAL TAXABLE 
TOTAL VALUE REAL ESTATE 



TOTAL TAX PERCENT OF 
ASSESSED TOTAL LEVY 



1 ) Andover Mills Realty Ltd. Partnership (Brickstone) 

2) Hewlett-Packard Company 

3) Genetics Institute, Inc. 

4) Lincoln Andover LLC (Putnam Investments) 

5) Raytheon Co. 

6) Gillette Company 

7) Bolger, David F Rev. Tr (Raytheon) 

8) Interstone/CGL Partners (Andover Marriott) 

9) Eisai Research Institute 

10) Digital Equipment Corp. 

1 1 ) One Hundred Minuteman LP 

12) Merrimac Mutual Fire Insurance 

13) Fifty Minuteman LP 

14) Brookside Estates LP 

15) Two Hundred Minuteman LP 



Office 


$63,651,600 


Industrial 


$42,795,700 


Industrial 


$31,614,100 


Office 


$27,853,100 


Industrial 


$27,003,700 


Industrial 


$26,730,000 


Industrial 


$21,854,500 


Hotel 


$18,246,100 


Office 


$17,872,500 


Industrial 


$15,601,826 


Industrial 


$14,972,200 


Office 


$13,289,600 


Office 


$12,849,600 


Apartments 


$12,849,600 


Office 


$12,545,700 


Totals 


$359,729,826 



1 .833% 


$63,651,600 


$1,328,189.67 


2.287% 


1.232% 


$42,795,700 


$980,021.53 


1 .687% 


0.910% 


$31,614,100 


$723,962.89 


1.246% 


0.802% 


$27,853,100 


$618,496.50 


1 065% 


0.778% 


$27,003,700 


$618,384.73 


1.065% 


0.770% 


$26,730,000 


$555,250 84 


0.956% 


0.629% 


$21,854,500 


$498,831 18 


0.859% 


0.525% 


$18,246,100 


$417,835.69 


0.719% 


0.515% 


$17,872,500 


$409,280 25 


0.705% 


0.449% 


$15,601,826 


$357,281.82 


0615% 


0.431% 


$14,972,200 


$236,860.20 


0.408% 


0.383% 


$13,289,600 


$303,26867 


522% 


0.370% 


$12,849,600 


$293,227.87 


0.505% 


0.370% 


$12,849,600 


$203,280 67 


0.350% 


0.361% 


$12,545,700 


$287,296.53 


495% 


10.358% 




$7,831,469.04 


13.484% 



TAX RATE RECAP 



EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures: 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgements 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 
Total Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 

Estimated Receipts from State: 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 

Total from State 

Estimated Local Receipts: 

Local Estimated Receipts 

Offset Receipts 

Enterprise Funds 

Revolving Funds (53e 1/2) 
Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Revenue: 

Free Cash - Articles 

Other Available Funds 
Total Other Appropriations 

Free Cash - Operating Budget 

Total Estimated Receipts 
Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 



BUDGET 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


FY1996 


FY1997 


FY1998 


FY1999 


$66,410,333 


S71.609.767 


$75,772,606 


S84,013,091 


40,000 


40,000 


40,000 


40,000 


40,492 


115,000 








543,401 


1,135,896 


588,013 


222,026 


66.663 


68.758 


64.552 


60.847 


690,556 


1,359,654 


692,565 


322,873 


1,059,262 


999,101 


1,020,557 


953,160 


735.201 


819.112 


926,191 


916.444 


$68,895,352 


$74,787,634 


$78,411,919 


$86,205,568 



$4,651,052 

63,099 

4,714,151 


$5,713,130 

39.631 

5,752,761 


$7,794,113 

5,837 

7,799,950 


$8,508,402 

5,390 

8,513,792 


4,733,000 
634,163 

7,357,947 

345,000 

13,070,110 


5,032,000 
699,000 

7,653,620 

400.000 

13,784,620 


5,945,000 

980.451 

7,726,937 



14,652,388 


6,281,000 

1,181,725 

8,001,185 



15,463,910 


180,000 
346.683 
526,683 


715,834 

369.133 

1,084,967 


465,645 
233.732 
699,377 


1,828,435 
2.017.957 
3,846,392 


300,000 


1,500,000 


300,000 


300.000 


18,610,944 
50.284.408 


22,122,348 
52.665.286 


23,451,715 
54.960.204 


28,124,094 
58.081.474 


$68,895,352 


$74,787,634 


$78,411,919 


$86,205,568 



VALUATIONS AND 
TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 



FY1996 


FY1997 


FY1998 


FY1999 


$2,777,252 


S3, 091, 930 


$3,156,121 


$3,472,883 


1641 


15.48 


15.82 


15.17 


23 99 


22.57 


22.90 


21.74 


18 11 


17.03 


17.41 


16.72 



WHERE REVENUES 
COME FROM 



STATE AID 
LOCAL REVENUE 
OTHER FUNDS 
FREE CASH 
PROPERTY TAXES 



FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



FY1999 



6.84% 


7.69% 


9.95% 


9.88% 


18.97% 


1 8.43% 


18.69% 


17.94% 


0.50% 


0.49% 


0.30% 


2.34% 


0.70% 


2.96% 


0.98% 


2.47% 


72.99% 


70.42% 


70.09% 


67.38% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUNDS 



Statement of Revenues, Expense and Changes in Fund Balance 



Water Enterprise 



Sewer Enterprise 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Charges for Services 



$5,881,179 



$2,342,805 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of Services and Administration 

Debt Service 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 

OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 



2,343,070 
2.280.136 
4,623,206 

1,257,973 



1,167,718 

520.653 

1,688,371 

654,434 



NONOPERATING REVENUES 

Investment Income 

NET INCOME BEFORE TRANSFERS 



48,363 
1,306,336 



12,239 
666,673 



TRANSFERS 

Transfers out 

Indirect costs transfer out 

TOTAL OPERATING TRANSFERS 

NET INCOME(LOSS) 

RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

Beginning of Fiscal Year 



(709.660) 
(709,660) 

596,676 



$609,540 



(40,000) 
(207.525) 
(247,525) 

419,148 



$122,754 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

End of Fiscal Year 



$1,206,216 



$541,902 



From Town of Andover Annual Audit Report for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1998 (Powers and Sullivan, CPA) 



•19- 



WATER AND SEWER ANNUAL REPORT 
DEBT SERVICE ---FY 1998 

SEWER 

ART 21 , 1 984 PUMPING STATION 

and 

ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET(Advance Refunding) 

ART 21 , 1 984 PUMPING STATION 

and 

ART 26, 1985 LOWELL STREET(Advance Refunding) 

ART 18, 1985 SANITARY SEWER 

ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER(Advance Refunding) 

ART 28, 1989 SANITARY SEWER(Advance Refunding) 

ART 33, 1989 NORTH STREET 

ART 41, 1991 NORTH STREET 

ART 32, 1997 PILGRIM/PIONEER CIRCLE 

TOTAL 



PRINCIPAL 



253,000.00 



INTEREST 



0.00 





94,760.00 


34,000.00 


5,474.00 


60,350.00 


12,939.94 




16,973.00 


5,000.00 


235.00 


25,000.00 


8,810.00 




4,110.81 


377,350.00 


143,302.75 



WATER 

ART 52, 1983 WATER BONDS 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1992 PUMPING STATION 

ART 1A, 1997 TREATMENT PLANT 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1992 BANCROFT PUMPING STATION 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 

ART 1A, 1987 TREATMENT PLANT(Advance Refunding) 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 53, 1994 WATER MAINS 

ART 32, 1995 WATER PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 33, 1995 WATER MAINS 

ART 31, 1995 FISH BROOK IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1993 PUMPING STATION REPAIR 

ART 32, 1995 WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

ART 24, 1996 WATER MAINS 

ART 46, 1992 WATER MAINS 

TOTAL 



100,000.00 
20,000.00 

155,000.00 

232,500.00 
54,250.00 
35,000.00 

180,000.00 
55,000.00 
10,000.00 
40,000.00 
65,000.00 
36,000.00 

326,000.00 

40,000.00 
14,000.00 
40,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 
25,000.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
50,000.00 

28,000.00 



4,125.00 

1,950.00 

15,112.00 

37,432.00 

11,641.14 

12,900.00 

58,435.00 

16,582.50 

1,375.00 

11,585.00 

12,390.00 

110,635.00 

82,591.00 

23,401.00 

47,443.00 

15,897.76 

5,150.00 

19,875.00 

49,857.50 

16,300.00 

8,507.50 

6,520.00 

24,000.00 

39,176.00 

11,505.00 



1,635,750.00 



644,386.40 



-20- 



wsar98 

ANNUAL REPORT 

WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE 



FY98 
SEWER 



FY98 
WATER 



REVENUES 




i 


Rate Collections 


2,192,818 


5,660,992 


Water Service Lines 




68,644 


Water Connection Fee 




65,078 


Water Testing Fees 




5,040 


Meter Installation Fee 




10,100 


Liens Added To Taxes 


47,195 


83,105 


Betterment Assessments 


111,759 


2,997 


Investment income 


12,239 


48,363 


Refunds 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES 


(8,967) 


(14,777) 


2,355,044 


5,929,542 






Direct Costs: 






Personal services 


155,960 


1,025,340 


Ordinary Maint. 


98,776 


1,317,730 


Sewer Assessment 
TOTAL DIRECT COSTS 


912,982 





1,167,718 


2,343,070 


Indirect Costs: 






Vehicle Maint. 


23,588 


58,035 


DPW Admin. 


14,425 


68,521 


Gen Admin, and Fin. 


35,210 


167,243 


Maint. Admin 


4,431 


11,078 


Motor Vehicle Ins. 


3,150 


9,690 


Comprehensive/Liability Ins. 


3,070 


47,709 


Workmen's Comp. 


12,303 


28,709 


Retirement 


55,815 


195,560 


Health Ins. 


16,711 


59,438 


Engineering 
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS 


38,822 


63,677 


207,525 


709,660 


Debt Service: 






Loan Interest 


143,303 


644,386 


Loan Principal 


377,350 


1,635,750 


BAN Interest/Issue expense 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 








520,653 


2,280,136 


1,895,896 


5,332,866 


459,148 


596,676 



-21- 



TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1998, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. Court 
challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town Counsel. 

Numerous matters were generated by the Planning Board including issues relating to the 
adoption of a wireless facility zoning bylaw. Town Meeting adopted a general bylaw to prohibit the 
sale of stink bombs, smoke bombs and silly string. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on almost 
a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. 
During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, 
easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. 

Special legislation authorized by Town Meeting for an Agreement with Phillips Academy and 
the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School regarding easements and 
conveyances of land on River Road was drafted and submitted to the Legislature. 



-22- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations. 521 
CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40 A of Massachusetts General Laws, Andover Zoning By-law, 
Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, Section 36, Ballardvale 
Historic District By-law and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the Town of Andover Code of 
By-laws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and regulations. The Building Division 
reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) submitted with applications for permits and 
issues all permits required for construction and other applicable activities for which permits are 
required by law. The Division performs all required site inspections as well as Code mandated 
safety inspections. The Building Division responds to customer inquiries, complaints and 
emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other Divisions of the Department of 
Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their permit processing and enforcement and 
attends, when necessary, Zoning Appeals Board, Planning Board and other Commission meetings. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION 





1995 




1996 


1997 




1998 


New Dwellings 


67 




95 


78 




68 


Additions/ Alterations to 














Single Family Dwellings 


576 




681 


722 




699 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 















1 


Additions/Alterations to 














Multi-Family Dwellings 


34 




21 


12 




13 


New Commercial and 














Industrial Buildings 


1 




4 


8 




1 


Additions/Alterations to 














Commercial and Industrial 














Buildings 


113 




105 


132 




138 


Schools/Public Buildings 


23 




24 


42 




32 


Swimming Pools 


20 




JO 


29 




26 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 














Stoves, Raze Permits 


265 




156 


134 




128 


Certificates of Inspection 


34 




109 


21 




35 


Total Fees Collected 


$420,807 


S575,692 


$658,594 


$458,506 


Total Estimated Value 


$78,654,000 


S75, 121,942 


$89,706,007 


$59,998,444 



-23- 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible 
for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for residential, 
commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the investigation of 
accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for lighting, power, fire- 
alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of equipment for emergency 
power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards and similar equipment. The 
Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code and inspects the corrective work 
for protection of the users and cooperates with the various electric companies that service the area. 

1996 1997 1998 

ELECTRICAL PERMITS: 1,118 1,137 1,178 

FEES COLLECTED $76,975.25 $78,285.06 $66,244.00 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the Board 
of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, plumbing 
and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure compliance with 
State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or reported to the proper 
authorities. 

1996 1997 1 998 

PLUMBING PERMITS 
FEES COLLECTED 
GAS FITTING PERMITS 
FEES COLLECTED 



648 


767 


850 


$32,1818 


$38,707 


$32,443 


544 


510 


605 


$13,810 


$14,706 


$13,810 



■24- 



BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
450 
400 




1990 



1992 



1994 



1996 



1998 



160 



40 



1990 



SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 




1992 



1994 



1996 



1998 



PERMIT FEES 



$900,000 
$800,000 
$700,000 
$600,000 
$500,000 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 




1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 





TOTAL # OF PERMITS 




1,300 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
900 
800 






_ - 


^y *^N/^^^. 






















1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 





-25- 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover 's natural resources and to 
act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission accepted the gift of 8.5 acres of land located at 400 Bullfinch 
Drive from Andover Business Park, Inc. for conservation purposes. In total there is approximately 
1,669 acres of land under the control and custody of the commission for conservation purposes. 



Conservation Commission Meetings 
Public Hearings & Meetings 
Orders of Conditions Issued 
Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 
Certificates of Compliance Issued 
Determinations of Applicability Issued 
Notification of Satisfactory 

Completion of Work 
Findings of Significance Issued 
Enforcement Orders Issued 
Emergency Certifications 
Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 
Conservation Restrictions Established 
Wetland Filing Fees Collected 
Expenditures from Conservation Fund 

by Fiscal Year 



1995 1996 1997 1998 



23 


23 


24 


22 


182 


270 


339 


374 


14 


33 


30 


40 


9 


11 


6 


7 


36 


40 


36 


23 


81 


123 


168 


153 


N/A 


11 


21 


44 


30 


28 


34 


68 


11 


7 


8 


9 


7 


2 


4 


6 


10.62 


3.0 


60 


8.5 


1 





1 





$8,800 


$11,090 


$13,217 


$14,389 


$92,005 


$86,000 


$1,360,000 






-26- 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with 
State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes 
primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land 
use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland 
pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as 
proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board 
of Health consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three 
year terms. 



ACTIVITY REPORT 



Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees Collected 



Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 

Office Visits 
Home Visits 

Influenza Immunization Clinic Attendance 
Pneumonia Immunization Attendance 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Glucose Screening Clinics 
Attendance 



1996 


1997 


1998 


12 

267 

160 

193 

2 

3 

$64,017 


12 

312 

290 

283 

2 

2 

$71,907 


11 

287 

232 

245 

6 

4 

$95,162 


CLINIC REPORT 






1996 


1997 


1998 


34 
390 


33 
351 


34 

372 


48 
720 


47 
699 


50 
687 


70 
5 


243 
5 


99 

4 


1312 
41 


1269 

32 


1324 
51 


9 

125 


9 

131 


9 
120 


1 
9 


1 
6 







-27- 



CLINIC REPORT (CONTINUED) 



Mantoux Tuberculin testing Attendance 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appointments & Follow Up 



1996 


1997 


1998 


129 


117 


96 


46 


41 


13 


ollow Up 20 


16 


9 



Hepatitis B Immunization Clinics 
Doherty Middle School 
West Middle School 
Andover High School 



Hepatitis B Vaccine 



499 

412 



265 
218 
89 



NON-COMMUNICABLE REPORTABLE DISEASES 



1996 



1997 



1998 



Other Mycobateria 

*A Typical Mycobacteria Avium 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



1996 



1997 



1998 



Animal Bites 

Bacteremia 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cyclospora 

E.coli0157.H7 

Giardia 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Listeriosis 

Lyme Disease 

Pertussis 

Measles (Rubeola) 

Meningitis (Bacterial) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Strep Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 



32 


38 


33 











23 


142 


15 


8 


3 


7 





1 





4 





1 


5 





3 


6 


4 


5 


1 





1 














2 


3 


1 


1 


3 





7 











4 





4 


4 


3 


7 


4 


2 














1 


2 


1 





1 





1 


1 





1 



-28- 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

The Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is a program conducted in 
collaboration with the Boards of Health in five communities (Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North 
Andover and Topsfield). The Program works to educate community residents about the health risks 
of smoking; eliminate youth access to tobacco; promote the health of residents, particularly children, 
by reducing public exposure to secondhand smoke; and provide free quit smoking classes. 

The Program staff, which consists of a Program Director and two Health Educators, is 
available to provide training and education, technical assistance around policy development, 
implementation and enforcement and free smoking cessation services. The Program is funded by 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Tobacco Control Program with the 25 cent excise 
tax on cigarettes. Since the inception of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program in 1991, 

trends show a decline in smoking, smokers smoking less and more people seeking out assistance in 
their attempts to quit smoking. 

• Per capita cigarette consumption in Massachusetts for adults has fallen 30% from 1 1 7 packs 
in 1992 to 82 packs in the first half of 1998. This is a decrease nearly triple the decrease for 
the rest of the nation. 

• Average lifetime smoking, current smoking (last 30 days) and daily smoking rates among 
8th, 10th and 12th graders from 1993 to 1996 leveled off or increased at lower rates than the 
rest of the nation. 

• Illegal sales of tobacco products to minors in Massachusetts has fallen from 48% (March to 
May 1994) to 8% (April to June 1997). 

• The number of private worksites in Massachusetts with indoor smoking bans has increased 
from 53% in 1993 to 66.6% in 1997. 

• The number of Massachusetts adults who live in smoke-free households has increased 36% 
from 40.7% in 1993 to 55.4% in 1997. 



ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATION ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATIONS RESTRICTING 
THE SALE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS TO MINORS 

The following is an overview of monitoring activities by Healthy Communities Tobacco 
Awareness Program throughout the 6 communities of its service area to ensure that retailers are not 
selling tobacco products to minors. 



■29- 





Sept. 
1994 


April 
1995 


Dec. 
1995 


April 
1996 


Jan. 
1997 


Jan. 
1998 


June 
1998 


Fall 
1998 


# Vendors 
Inspected 


84 


102 


130 


107 


128 


114 


114 


76 


# Illegal Sales * 


53 


20 


2 


6 


5 


1 





11 


% Compliance 


37% 


80% 


98% 


94% 


96% 


99% 


100% 


86% 





















*Denotes the number of sales which were made to minors. 



Due to the decreased level in 1998 of compliance among retailers who sell tobacco products, 
Healthy Communities will concentrate its efforts in 1 999 on improving compliance among retailers. 
Activities planned include retailer education, distribution of educational materials and a public 
information campaign. 



QUIT SMOKING CLASSES 

The Healthy Communities Program provides free classes to assist persons attempting to quit 
smoking. The classes consist of four weekly sessions. 

In 1998, 78 individuals participated in the Stop Smoking classes. Of the participants, 65 
completed the class (attended at least three of the four sessions). Six months after completion of the 
class, the 65 participants were surveyed by Healthy Communities - 28 people responded as follows: 

• 16 individuals reported being smoke-free 

• 27 participants reported that the cessation classes were helpful - 19 participants 
ranked the classes as very helpful 



-30- 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING STATISTICS 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
TOTAL CLINIC ATTENDANCE 

i nr\n 


o,uuu 






2,500 
2,000 
1,500 


^ 




/ 


/ 




* 




1,000 






1996 1997 1998 





PUBLIC HEALTH 
COMPLAINTS & INVESTIAGIONS 



300 
250 
200 
150 
100 



1996 



1997 



1998 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES 
"QUIT SMOKING" CLASSES 



15 




1995 1996 



1997 



1998 



Males 
Females 



50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



..a. 


,& % \ 




0? ,..#. 


•^ -»- T 



1995 



1996 



1997 



1998 



—•" Definitive Subdivision "&" ANR Plans 
■■"♦•" Preliminary Subdivision 



-31- 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations 
of the Master Plan. 

In 1998 the Planning Division saw a shift in focus from residential and commercial 
development activity to projects associated with downtown revitalization and major transportation 
system improvements. Staff began coordinating a 2.5 million dollar Main Street project and 
continued work on transportation projects such as River Road, Dascomb Road, and Burtt Road. 
Staff also worked on improving the parking facilities at the two Andover MBTA stations. A new 
Downtown Planner came on board to assist in business district improvement strategies and the 
Planning Board began a series of public forums on downtown issues. 

Planning Division activities began to bear fruit in the downtown retail district with the 
construction of the new plaza on Park Street and the commencement of construction on a new office 
building on the former Krinski property. The division staff took major strides toward developing 
a sophisticated Geographic Information System (GIS) which, when implemented, will take us into 
the next century with a significantly enhanced record keeping and retrieval system for our land use 
and infrastructure data. 

Development activities in the industrial areas, which had experienced a sharp increase in the 
previous year, began to level off during 1998. Construction commenced on several buildings which 
were part of the 1 .5 million square feet of new space allowed for under special permits issued by the 
Planning Board in 1997. 

1995 1996 1997 1998 



Planning Board Meetings 


23 


23 


25 


26 


Public Hearings Held 


75 


57 


131 


70 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


6 


4 


10 


7 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


4 


19 


9 


6 


ANR Plans 


19 


34 


42 


28 


Site Plan Reviews 


3 


1 


7 


7 


Special Permits issued 


23 


23 


36 


22 


Lot Releases and Clearance 


76 


78 


103 


72 


Certificates issued 










Warrant Articles Reported 


35 


40 


32 


39 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$479,529 


$596,882 


$493,420 


$242,264 


Street Acceptances 


12 


7 


9 


7 


Fees Collected 


$52,079 


$65,867 


$273,554 


$182,976 



-32- 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and the Town 
Zoning By-law. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, 
Memorial Hall, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following 
areas: 

• A variance from the requirements of the Zoning By-law 

• A special permit under the Zoning By-Law 

• A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings 
or other Administrative Official 

• Permission to construct low or moderate income housing 
within the Town of Andover (Comprehensive Permit) 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are requested, 
legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings 
are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. 
Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in 
question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented at the hearing, and 
the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk and the Registry of 
Deeds. 



1994 

Number of Regular Meetings 12 

Deliberations Meetings 13 

Petitions Filed 78 

Petitions Granted 58 

Petitions Denied 10 
Petitions Withdrawn or 

Dismissed 10 

Fees Collected N/A 



1995 

13 
15 
73 
47 
11 

15 

N/A 



1996 



1997 



1998 



12 


13 


13 


12 


13 


16 


63 


122/128* 


110/120* 


55 


101 


103 


6 


17 


15 


2 


10 


10 


$7,975 


$15,494 


$19,075 



Some petitions contained requests for both variances and special permits. 



■33- 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Department of Community Sennces and The Andover Youth Services strive to provide 
the residents of Andover a myriad of social, educational, cultural and recreational opportunities 
embracing diversity and accessibility for all by reading the pulse of the community and 
incorporating ideas into valued programs for its citizens now and in the future. 

Community Services offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for 
residents of all ages. The majority of the programs are held at the public schools, Recreation Park, 
Pomps Pond, The Park, Senior Center, Greater Lawrence Regional, Vocational, Technical High 
School and other in-town facilities. Community Services continues to transfuse residents' ideas into 
valued programs. A vigorous departmental effort continually improves service to our community. 
Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of community-based instructors, streamlined 
registration including fax, VIS A/MasterCard, overnight mailbox and increased identification with the 
DCS booklet publication. The new look to the program booklet continues with layout improvements 
making the document much easier for residents to read. Enrollments have increased within the 
children's and youth programming categories attributed to the offerings of one week skills clinics. 

Instructors come from all segments of the community. Professionals, specialists, hobby 
enthusiasts, homemakers, student interns and retired individuals comprise the teaching and leadership 
staff. This varied instructor base allows the department the ability to offer diverse programs. The 
majority of its instructional staff reside within the Town; however, some reside in our neighboring 
Towns. In several instances DCS is able to bring in quality programs from outside the region (science 
workshops, jump roping clinic and soccer). Andona babysitting, sports clinics, junior golf, basketball, 
rope skipping, french, book club and soccer were the most popular children's programs. Top adult 
picks are dog obedience, photography, swing dancing, yoga, golf, family gingerbread house 
workshops and computer classes. Evening adult education classes returned to the Andover High 
School after a three year absence due to the school renovation project. More than 1500 people are 
enrolled in the DCS sports programs during any one season. Over the summer months the DCS 
serves over 800 children a week in the multiple camp and enrichment programs offered. The ever 
popular 4 th of July celebration in the Park with the Horribles Parade attracted thousands of residents 
with 1500 residents coming out for the Pancake Breakfast. Below is a sample listing of popular 
programs, the revenue they produced and the number of participants. 

PROGRAM REVENUE PARTICIPANTS 

Youth Basketball $12,480.00 260 

Youth Baseball/Softball $ 5,200.00 150 

Bradford Ski $30,000.00 300 

Rope Skipping Clinic $ 2,000.00 80 

Swim & Play $17,500.00 140 

School Vacation Camps $6,400.00 350 

All Day Discovery $39,600.00 240 

Drop In Playground $24,650.00 290 

John Smith Soccer $15,630.00 149 

Jump To It $ 9,500.00 80 



-34- 



PROGRAM REVENUE PARTICIPANTS 

Skyhawks Programs $ 7,000.00 80 

Golf Camps " $24,000.00 125 

Coed Softball League $25,000.00 600 

Basketball League $ 2,800.00 120 

Ballroom Dancing $ 5,600.00 200 

Andover Youth Services has continued to create new programs and improve upon the 
offerings from last year. The Andover Community Skate Park made history on July 1 1 with the 
opening of one of the finest skate parks in the nation. The AYS organized skateboarders and helped 
them secure funding for the park through Town Meeting and was responsible for the construction, 
maintenance, and daily operation for the park. Over 1400 skaters soared, ollied, and enjoyed an 
opportunity to pursue the sport they love. People of all ages came down to the park to watch the 
skaters, and listen to bands. Other special events included Subliminal Madness and Laxapolooza. The 
Venture Out summer program offered a wide variety of trips, adventures, and services that attracted 
the interest of one thousand middle school students. Middle school students participated in rock 
climbing, street hockey, mountain biking, skate trips, outing club trips, basketball clinics after school. 

Lacrosse continued to expand by implementing a winter lacrosse clinic and five teams into 
competitive play during the spring season. Friends of Andover Youth Lacrosse was established and 
raised $15,000 to provide the foundation for Andover High's first lacrosse team next spring. An all 
new Keep It Wild Fashion Show was held at the Town House with 1 10 high school aged designers 
participating in this successful event. 

The revolving account continues to assist the Department in the ability to sponsor a variety 
of activities. School vacation, Children's Studio for the Arts, children's golf and literacy programs 
are examples of programs that were funded through the this account. The account has also allowed 
the DCS to run trips to Ireland, Las Vegas, Europe, and all Andover Youth Services programs. 

Programs developed in conjunction with other agencies included Memorial Hall Library, 
Andover Historical Society, Alternative Leisure, Kaplan, and The French and Spanish Saturday 
School. Several Tax Voucher volunteers worked in the DCS office to assist with registration, general 
office duties and after school and evening programming as well as individuals from the Alternative 
Sentencing Program. 

Improvements to Pomps Pond acquired from Annual Town Meeting included upgrading the 
dock system and handicapped accessibility to the water. The new dock system should be in place for 
opening day June 1999. Two ballooned tire wheelchairs will assist wheelchair bound individuals and 
others who would have difficulty walking on the sand from the parking lot to the waters' edge. The 
menu selection at the concession stand expanded with the purchase of a new oven to crisp up the 
french fries and to serve up a better tasting hamburger and hot dog. 

DCS/AYS looks forward to continuing to provide citizens of all ages with quality social, 
cultural, educational and recreational opportunities in the new year ahead. 



-35- 



COMMUNITY SERVICES / YOUTH SERVICES STATISTICS 



FY1994 FY1995 

Community Services General Fund Offset Receipts $272,1 1 3 $280,009 
Community Services Revolving Account $67,466 $103,637 
Youth Services Revolving Account $0 $0 
Community Services Class Participants 4,1 36 


FY1996 

$268,766 

$85,556 

$0 

4,524 


FY1997 

$348,812 

$61,166 

$18,403 

5,705 


FY 1998 

$382,952 

5152,911 

$80,948 

5,890 



$700,000 
$600,000 
$500,000 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 
$100,000 
$0 



REVENUES 











■Si 








•7777777777777777777% 


^^^^^^ 




! H 





FY1994 



FY1995 



Youth Services Revolving 
Community Services Revolving 



FY1996 FY1997 

Community Services General Fund 



FY1994 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 
CLASS PARTICIPANTS 




FY1995 



FY1996 



FY1997 



■36- 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic process, 
to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the community and the 
State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



In 1998, the Town Clerk's office oversaw one Town Election, two State Elections and a 
Town Meeting with a Warrant of 104 articles. The State Primary Election in September was a major 
challenge due to the sticker campaign undertaken by those candidates running for the Democratic 
State Representative seat in the Seventeenth Essex District as no name appeared on the official ballot. 

Working with other departments, an extensive amount of microfilming was completed in the 
Treasurer's office, Accounting office and Clerk's office to preserve and insure better management 
of the Town records. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

The following chart shows the voter turnout for all of the elections in 1998: 

Election Date # Voted % of Voters 



Town Election 


March 24 


3,212 


17% 


State Primary 


September 15 


5,449 


29% 


State Election 


November 3 


11,969 


63% 



In January, the Town Census was mailed to 11,074 households. The population at the 
completion of the census was 30,226. 

The year ended with 19,287 registered voters in the Town's eight precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1-2147 


Precinct 3 ■ 


■2265 


Precinct 5 ■ 


■2627 


Precinct 7 - 2290 


Precinct 2 - 2524 


Precinct 4 ■ 


-2460 


Precinct 6 ■ 


■2478 


Precinct 8 - 2496 








1996 


1997 


1998 


Births Recorded 






365 


341 


312 


Marriages Recorded 






187 


189 


174 


Deaths Recorded 






260 


251 


258 


Dog Licenses Sold 






2022 


2204 


2041 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 




566 


630 


560 


Business Certificates 






106 


126 


112 


UCC Filings 






452 


462 


514 


Registered Voters 






3428 


991 


1689 



-37- 



FEES COLLECTED: 





1996 


1997 


1998 


Marriage Licenses 


2,850.00 


2,850.00 


2,655.00 


Certified Copies 


10,265.00 


10,851.00 


11,313.50 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings 


6,258.00 


6,249.32 


5,861.00 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income 


12,365.00 


11,250.00 


11,955.00 


Liquor Licenses Income 


99,930.00 


97,905.00 


97,345.00 


Business Certificate Filings 


2,795.00 


3,045.00 


2,630.00 


Miscellaneous Income 


4,654.81 


5,829.05 


5,861.00 


Dog Licenses 


16,062.00 


17,954.00 


14,469.00 


Non Criminal Violations 


1,025.00 


1,925.00 


790.00 


Copy of Public Records 


N/A 


105.80 


543.20 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 


16.013.20* 


13.479.55** 


12.880.20*** 


TOTAL 


$172,218.01 


$171,443.72 


$166,550.45 



$15,751.40 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $261.80 
was retained by the Town of Andover. 



** 



$13,247.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $231.80 
was retained by the Town of Andover. 






$12,658.75 in fees was sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $221.45 
was retained by the Town of Andover. 



-38- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and advocate 
for programs and sendees designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of elders in the 
community, and to provide a focal point in the community where these programs and services can 
be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

THE COMMUNITY OF ELDERS 

Another year of programs and services at the Senior Center demonstrated the growing needs 
of the 5,100 members of the "Andover Community of Elders." Within this report charts and graphs 
document the Division's activities and services. Most categories of service continued to show 
significant increases. Space allocation and internal coordination efforts proved to be a frustrating 
challenge and, in many cases, impossible. New methods of data collection and accounting were 
researched and developed. In order to accommodate the increases in the number and types of 
programs and the number of participants major changes in scheduling were undertaken. 

Creative programming continued to draw the interest of an increasing number of elders, as 
did volunteer opportunities. For example, the number of special events nearly doubled over the 
previous year. Volunteers drove 8,000 miles in 1997 to bring seniors to medical appointments. In 
1998, the number of miles increased to nearly 13,000. These increases had a substantial effect on the 
administrative coordination of programs and volunteerism. 

Changes outside the Division also had a dramatic effect on services and administration. The 
effect of cuts and changes in federal and state funded services provided to elders by other agencies 
resulted in increased requests for Outreach and Social Services and a decrease in the use of the Social 
Day Services. There was a significant increase in the number of home visits, rising from 99 in 1997 
to 120 in 1998. Opened cases increased from 507 to 550 in the same period. While so-called "no-cut 
Medicare cuts" resulted in increased demands for services at the local level it also caused elders to 
choose in-home services over attendance in the Social Day Program. 

The Division responded in several ways to try to alleviate the problems caused by these cuts 
Staff engaged in discussions with other agencies, including local schools of nursing, in order to 
develop programs that will ensure access to the services elders need at low or no cost to the Division. 
The Social Day staff developed a plan to increase outreach to elders, employers and the community 
and developed creative ways for elders to participate in the program part-time. 

HEALTH. WELLNESS. NUTRITION AND ADVOCACY 

The Senior Center sponsored an educational conference in cooperation with four agencies 
entitled "Advocacy for You and Your Health." Over 60 elders and health care providers participated 
Workshops on Hospice, Alternative Medicine, Medicare benefits and how to advocate for services 
and benefits were offered. Representative Marty Meehan was the keynote speaker. Continuing 
Education Units were offered for professionals. More than twenty seniors signed up to be part of an 
"Advocacy Hotline," the first step in developing a significant advocacy effort at the Center. 



-39- 



This was a landmark year at the Senior Center in the area of Nutrition. The School 
Department turned the lunch program over to the Division in March. After much discussion and 
negotiation with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts a formal contract was signed in October 
making the program a full-fledged Title III project under the Older Americans Act. While this had 
a negative effect on the anticipated revenues for the year, it did provide certain protections for elders 
who use the program and offered some stability to this important service. Nevertheless, the program 
made a successful transition from School Department to the Division and customers are pleased with 
the program. 

INTERGENERATIONAL/EDUCATIONAL 

In cooperation with the Community Service Program of Andover High School, Division staff 
developed the model program "Aging is an Adventure". The Vi credit High School course offered a 
unique opportunity for students and seniors to learn about each other and the various aspects of 
aging. Each week focused on a different topic including art, literature, music, the myths of aging, and 
how to age well. The course was selected by the Massachusetts Association of Councils on Aging 
and Senior Centers for presentation at its Fall 1998 statewide conference. This model program can 
be replicated in other communities and will make the national circuit in 1999 as an innovative model 
project. 

GOALS & OBJECTIVES 

The Staff and Council on Aging analyze statistical data annually, raise questions about 
effective service delivery, and plan for the future, continuously seeking to identify new needs and 
improve service delivery. 

Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, programs, 
intergenerational opportunities, education, volunteer opportunities and various administrative 
operations. New goals and objectives for the year 2000 include a reorganization that will incorporate 
all related services into a comprehensive Center for Health, Wellness & Nutrition. Advocacy efforts 
will be strengthened and special emphasis will be placed on improving transportation. 

COUNCIL ON AGING AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR A NEW SENIOR CENTER 

The Council on Aging sponsored a joint meeting of the Council, The Friends of the Andover 
Senior Center, Inc. and the Senior Center Building Committee to develop a coordinated plan to 
ensure the advancement of the building project. The Council conducted a Public Hearing at which 
over 140 citizens voiced their support for locating the new Center on the Phillips Academy campus. 
The Council, with the recommendation of the Building Committee, cooperation of the Friends, Inc. 
and the input received at the Public Hearing, then voted to advocate for the signing of a lease offered 
by Phillips Academy for a site for the new center. A private Warrant Article was developed for the 
1999 Town Meeting. 



-40- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



DESCRIPTION 


FY1996 


FY1997 


FY 1998 


SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM 








Number of Individual Clients 


40 


47 


37 


Total Days Used 


3,434 


3,067 


2,591 


INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 








Number of Unduplicated Elders 


212 


480 


550 


LECTURES & SEMINARS 








Lectures & Seminars 


36 


36 


32 ^ 


Number of Attendees 


810 


969 


1,043! 


NUTRITION 








Meals-on- Wheels Served 


13,072 


13,092 


8,725 


Number of MOW Clients 


99 


120 


105 


On-site Lunches Served 


6,009 


10,400 


11,469 


Lunch Site Attendees 




1,034 




Total # Meals Served 


19,180 


23,612 


20,299 


SOCIAL & RECREATION 








Supper Club Attendees 


30 


90 


100 


Number of Special Events 


15 


10 


25 


Total Number Bingo Games 


47 


47 


45 


Total Bingo Attendees 


3,272 


3,024 


2,678 


MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 








Number of Miles Driven 


7,917 


8,000 


12,720 


Number of Rides 


500 


550 


1,100 


Number of Riders 


102 


109 


150 


Number of Drivers 


18 


18 


26 


FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 








Number of Clients 


27 


42 


65 


Number of Visitors 


20 


42 


90 


Value of Program 






$65,520 


VOLUNTEER SERVICES 








Senior Center Volunteers* 


124 


141 


149 


Number of Hours Served 


15,519 


19,079 


22,417 


Value to Senior Center 


$217,266 


$267,106 


$313,838 



-41- 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



DESCRIPTION 


FY1996 


FY1997 


FY1998 


TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 








# Tax Voucher Volunteers 


88 


91 


100 


# Hours Served 


8,800 


9,100 


10,000 


Value to Town Offices 


$123,200 


$119,320 


$97,340 


Value to Senior Center 


$14,000 


$23,550 


$59,660 


Total Value Tax Voucher 


$137,200 


$142,870 


$157,000 


Total Value All Volunteer Service 


$354,466 


$409,976 


$513,498 


ELDERLY HEALTH CLINICS 








Blood Pressure (wkly.) 


801 


739 


693 


Flu Shots (2/yr.) 


731 


136 


835 


Pneumonia Shots 


41 


n/a 


26 


OUTREACH SERVICES 








Number Clients 


353 


469 


480 


Number of Cases 


409 


507 


550 


Home Visits 


92 


99 


120 


Hospital Visits 


4 


5 


2 


Office Visits 


125 


120 


180 


S.H.I.N.E. 


62 


80 


100 


Other 


272 


300 


400 


Services Provided by Other Agencies 








Elder Services of Merrimack Vallev 


452 


318 


259 


Unduplicated Clients 


Proportionate Cost of Services 


$356,124 


$306,061 


$340,966 


Familv Services of Greater Lawrence 


93 


159 


100 


Number of Cases 


Number Clients 


40 


73 


80 


Total Contacts 


417 


448 


448 


Visiting Nurses Association 


525 


536 


500 


Total # Clients 



"incorrectly reported as 241 in 1997 



-42- 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



VALUE OF VOLUNTEER 
SERVICES 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 



FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



VOLUNTEER HOURS SERVED 




FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



OUTREACH SERVICES 



600 



550 



500 



450 



400 
350 



300 



FY1996 



FY1997 

"*— Clients 
■•••■ Cases 



FY1998 



105 



100 



95 



90 



85 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
# OF PARTICIPANTS 



FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



-43- 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



50 



45 



40 



35 



30 



SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM 
# Clients (Non-duplicated) 



FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 
# Clients (Non-Duplicated) 



600 




FY1996 



FY1997 



FY1998 



MEALS SERVED 




FY1996 FY1997 

—•— On-Site Lunches 
■"••" Meals on Wheels 



FY1998 



FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 


lUU 

90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
F 


I 


y I 


,*** 


^M 


s^^ 


J^^ 


^^Z^^ 






Y1996 FY1997 FY1998 

*■*- Clients 
•••♦■•• Visitors 



-44- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly protect lives and property by 
providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents of 
Andover. 



To achieve its mission, the Fire Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or 
fire-related activities through inspections, training and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



1996 



1997 



1998 



TOTAL INCIDENTS: 


5410 


5491 


5703 


Fires 


239 


293 


245 


Rescues 


12 


14 


8 


Miscellaneous Alarms 


174 


140 


278 


Accidental Alarms 


633 


809 


243 


Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 


17 


25 


19 


False Alarms 


180 


70 


195 


Violations 


8 


2 


1 


Ambulance Emergency Calls 


2105 


2009 


2022 


Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 


227 


171 


174 


Fire Prevention Activities 


1767 


1757 


1864 


In-Service Calls 


3 


12 


428 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


39 


168 


181 


Training 


6 


21 


45 


PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED: 


1745 


2152 


2048 


Smoke Detectors 


665 


666 


764 


Report Copies 


67 


68 


61 


Blasting Permits 


8 


14 


16 


Cutting/Welding Permits 


17 


28 


15 


Dumpster Permits 


111 


117 


69 


Fireworks Display Permits 


1 


2 


1 


Gunpowder Storage Permits 








1 


Liquid Gas Storage Permits 


39 


53 


53 


Flammable. Liquid Storage Permits 


3 


2 


4 


Miscellaneous Permits 


3 


2 


11 


Open Air Burning Permits 


523 


791 


679 


Oil Burner Install Permits 


117 


154 


166 


Reinspection Fees 


14 








Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 


9 


1 


28 



-45- 



1996 



1997 



1998 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (Cont): 

Special Suppression System Permits 
Sprinkler Install Permits 
Tentage Permits 

Underground Tank Recertification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



FACILITIES: 



1 





5 


39 


64 


58 


19 


1 


1 


3 


4 


16 


107 


72 


99 





2 


2 


129 


132 


138 


APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT : 





Central Station 

32 North Main Street 



3 ambulances, 1 ladder truck, 

1 pumper, 1 boat, 3 sedans, 

1 Command vehicle and 1 brush truck 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



2 pumpers, 1 fire alarm truck, 
1 boat, 1 brush truck and 
1 Ladder Tower 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 pumper and 1 boat 



PERSONNEL: 



1996 



1997 



1998 



68.7 



68.7 



68.7 



FEES COLLECTED: 



Ambulance Fees 
Permits/Licenses 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



$314,069 


$358,186 


$368,660 


25,500 


32,210 


32,105 


18,750 


20,250 


20,700 



-46- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



350 




200 

150 

100 

50 



FIRE CALLS 



1996 1997 1998 

~*— Andover "••■" Mutual Aid 




800 



600 - 



PERMITS & LICENSES 
ISSUED 






1996 



1997 



1998 



Smoke Detectors E3 Master Fire Alarm Boxes 
■ Open Air Burning D Dumpster 




-47- 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs desired 
by the community of Andover, and to actively seek to make townspeople and organizations aware 
of library resources and services. 



Memorial Hall Library continues to serve its reading, listening, and viewing clientele with 
an ever growing collection of new books, periodicals, compact disks, and videotapes. The 
Children's Library continues to provide materials and programs that prepare children for reading and 
stimulates the interests of those already reading. Although attendance in the library and at programs 
remained higher than ever, there was a small, but noticeable, drop in the number of Children's books 
checked out this past year. As the number of non-print materials circulated increased, this may be 
an indication of one CD-ROM being checked out in place of several books. We will continue to 
analyze these figure to see if the pattern continues. 

The use of the Internet and other electronic information resources provided through 
Memorial Hall Library is not fully documented by the statistics that accompany this report. We are 
currently tracking ways to measure new uses of the Library and we will include those statistics in 
future reports. Each day, library users sit down at the 1 4 computers in the Reference area to look 
up some information critical to their lives. The Reference Librarian must be not only a master of 
how to look up information in books, but also a navigator of the Internet and a teacher of how to use 
electronic resources. Over the past year, countless individual instruction sessions occurred as the 
librarians sat with users and explained to them how to search for useful sites on the Web. As these 
resources continually change, it will be necessary for the library's reference staff to keep themselves 
current on what information is out there on the Web and to help library users find the sites they need. 
Group instruction sessions on the subject of the Internet and other electronic resources available 
through the library are now offered at the library on a regular schedule. The library staff welcomes 
your participation in these sessions as well as your individual requests for help. 

The following achievements were accomplished during 1998: 

• Installed 14 PC work stations in the Reference Area with a menu front end to integrate the 
numerous web, CD-ROM and DVD-ROM electronic reference products. 

• Rewired the entire library to support 10/100 Base T networking functions with over 140 
drops providing network access throughout the library. 

• Implemented MediaOne Internet access throughout the library. 

• In conjunction with the Council Aging, installed four PC work stations with access to the 
Internet at the Drop-in Center located in the Old Town Hall. 



-48- 



• In addition to the full complement of story hours, clubs, class visits and films, the Children's 
Room activities featured performance by Jim Weiss(Storyteller), the Reed Sisters(duo 
pianists), a one person show portraying Laura Ingalls Wilder, a writing workshop, a science 
show and a magic show. 

• Carried out preliminary planning for expansion of Children's Room and Young Adult area. 

• Provided back-up regional reference services for more than 200 libraries in Northeast 
Massachusetts Regional Library System answering 1,409 questions, visiting 50 member 
library sites, presenting four workshops and providing tours. 

• A monthly series of speakers on Wednesday mornings and Sunday concerts celebrating the 
heritage of Andover's residents. 

• Trustee purchase of David Sullivan's painting "After Cezanne." 

The success of the library depends upon the support of the community, the interest and 
dedication of the Library Trustees, and the hard work of the library staff and volunteers. We are 
most fortunate to have all of these qualities in abundance. 

CIRCULATION: 





1996 


1997 


1998 


Adult Books & Periodicals 


228,620 


215,307 


215,735 


Children's Books & Periodicals 


176,802 


190,558 


178,217 


Adult Non-Print 


74,338 


81,015 


86,192 


Children's Non-Print 


21.148 


23,346 


26,576 


TOTAL 


490,293 


500,908 


507,320 


OTHER LIBRARY STATISTICS: 









Reference Questions 
PC & Internet Sessions 
Programs 

Program Attendance 
Meeting Room Use 
Reserves Placed 
Interlibrary Loan Requests 
Volunteer Hours 



39,122 



43,834 



40,327 



2,079 


7,742 


10,343 


269 


402 


306 


8,169 


9,408 


11,171 


504 


439 


530 


10,264 


10,383 


10,118 


4,094 


4,732 


4,240 


1,412 


1,372 


2,159 



-49- 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 





1995 


1996 


1997 


1998 


Total Circulation 


490,293 


500,908 


510,226 


507,320 


Non-Print Circulation 


91,833 


95,486 


104,361 


113,368 


Children's Circulation 


195,782 


197,950 


213,904 


204,793 


PC and Internet Use 





2,079 


7,742 


10,343 


Reference Questions 


35,448 


39,122 


43,834 


40,327 



TOTAL CIRCULATION 

cen nnn 


DOU,UUU 






500,000 

450,000 

400,000 

350,000 
inn nnn 






" 














o(JU,UUU 

1995 1996 1997 1998 







NON-PRINT 
CIRCULATION 






120,000 

110,000 

100,000 

90,000 

80,000 








j^ 


^-— ^ 








1995 


1996 1997 


1998 





REFERENCE QUESTIONS 

ah nnn 


40,UUU 

40,000 

35,000 

30,000 
oe nnn 


/Ss. 




^ 












£0,UUU 

1995 1996 1997 1998 



PC & INTERNET USE 

•io nnn 


1Z,UUU 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

i 4,000 

2,000 






/ 




/ 


/ 


/ 


^^ 


U 

1995 1996 1997 1998 



-50- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission oftheAndover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality 
of life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing 
times of increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the 
community. To continue our mission, we will maintain an open door policy to the 
community, working with their suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the 
way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public 
safety and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members 
of the Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and the By-laws of the Town of Andover to ensure that the peace and 
tranquility of our neighborhoods are maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are 
reduced. We emphasize integrity, honesty, impartiality and professionalism from our 
members in order to create an environment that values differences and fosters fairness and 
flexibility in our mission. We encourage citizen input and interaction that will assist us in 
developing sound partnerships between the community and the police. Working together we 
can protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Police Department had four officers retire in 1998 including Chief James F. 
Johnson, Lieutenants John P. Houlihan and Steven Avery, Detective Joseph Hastings and 
Patrolman John W. Milne. In March new Chief of Police Brian J. Pattullo was chosen to 
lead the Department into the next millennium. During the year Chief Pattullo implemented 
several new programs including a Mountain Bike Patrol, a new Explorers Program as well 
as restructuring of entire Department, its personnel and their duties. 

The total number of incidents for 1998 was down 9.09% from 1997 and up 9.14% 
from the year 1996. Adult arrests were up 8.75% from '97 and juvenile arrests were up 
40.74% from both '96 and '97. There were only two reported incidents of rape in 1998 
(down from four in '97) while assaults were down by 22.08% for the same period. 

The Town experienced an 8.90% increase in thefts from 1997 but this was still a 
decrease of 23.39% from the previous year. Stolen motor vehicles increased by 7.8 1 % from 
1997 but this was also a decrease from 1996 of 25.80%. The total number of house breaks 
was also down by 8.79% from 1997 and down 31.40% from 1996. The Town experienced 
only one motor vehicular fatality in 1998, down from three in 1997 and two in 1996, 
however, the total of motor vehicle accidents in 1998 was up from the previous two years. 

The total number of motor vehicle citations, parking tickets and, mileage that the 
cruisers were driven and gasoline consumption were all down from both 1 996 and 1 997. This 
was expected as the Department was short staffed by six officers for almost the entire year. 



-51- 



The Department hired six new officers in June and they graduated from the Lowell Police 
Academy in late October. After completing an extensive in-house training period, the six 
officers joined the Patrol force the last week of December. 

The Police Department continued to work with other departments and agencies 
throughout the year. The Department also participated in numerous events including the 
Christmas and Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, 
Bazaar Days, Know Your Town, the Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well 
as numerous other road races held during the year. The Department also implemented a 
strong emphasis on enforcement of seat belt usage in an attempt to reduce deaths and major 
injuries incurred in motor vehicle accidents. 

RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
support service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the department as well as 
to the entire community. An additional employee was hired for the division to provide 
personal computer application support in accounts payable. With the addition of this new 
position, a computerized accounts payable tracking system was implemented. 

Through the use of the FY98 Community Policing Grant, Internet access was 
provided to all of the personal computers throughout the Public Safety Center. Preliminary 
development was done to the Police Department's web site and Internet e-mail was instituted. 
In addition, an NT server network was installed, additional personal computers were 
purchased and Windows training was provided to many of the department's personnel. 

Additional grants were awarded in several different areas. A $60,000 Community 
Policing Grant was received for the purpose of computer upgrades, traffic monitoring and 
new community policing efforts. A $25,000 COPs Fast grant was awarded to partially 
suplement the salary of the officer hired under the COPs Fast grant four years ago. A $5,000 
grant sponsored by the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau was awarded in an effort to 
increase seatbelt use, decrease drunk driving and lower traffic speeds. 

The Court Section of the division processed a total of 448 arrests, 454 summonses 
and 605 hearings. This included tracking all Police Department cases from inception to 
disposition and coordinating officers appearances in court. In addition, this section also 
assists in tracking District Court cases for other Town departments (Health Division, Building 
Division, etc.). 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division focused primarily on residential and business breaks as 
well as robberies and serious thefts and assaults. The Division was instrumental in solving 



■52- 



and identifying the perpetrators of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases 
through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 32 commercial breaks (down 
from 34 in 1997 and 60 in 1996) and 49 residential breaks (up from 45 in 1997 and down 
from 66 in 1996). The number of reported robberies has remained constant at four for each 
of the past three years. 

The Division continued to receive and process Pistol Permit applications, the printing 
and photographing of prisoners and the processing of all crime scenes. The investigation of 
check and credit card schemes continued to account for a large part of the Division's 
manpower hours. 

The Division was also successful in solving and prosecuting several prominent 
vandalism incidents involving school buildings. 

One area of concern that arose during 1998 was the increase and seriousness of child 
pornography incidents on the Internet. The Department recognizes this new aspect of 
pornography as a major problem to all communities and cautions all parents and residents of 
the Town to be vigilant of this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

All categories of calls for the Animal Control Officer in 1998 continued the three year 
trend of decreasing. It is apparent that strong enforcement of existing animal laws has 
increased both public awareness and greater compliance with the Town's By-laws relating to 
domesticated animals. 

The Animal Control Officer continued to emphasize public awareness of rabies and 
the hidden dangers of attempting to feed sick or injured wildlife. The Animal Control Officer 
also began to stress public awareness of the growing and troublesome problem of the feral 
coyote population within the Town. Both of these issues are expected to continue to be a 
major problem in the years ahead. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division serves as the local link to the Federal and State 
Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA) and includes a network of HAM radio 
operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio services. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. 
They are a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their 
services as a resource. 



-53- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



100 

90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



**' tg 



1996 1997 

—♦ — Motor Vehicles 
■■■•■■■ Bicycles 



1998 




PARKING VIOLATIONS 


11,000 

10,000 

9,000 

8,000 






■, 








^\^ 




^»«s^ 




7,000 


^**"S^ 




^"•x^ 


6,000 








5,000 








4,000 








3,000 






1996 1997 1998 






■54- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 






Assaults 


•■ 


80 
70 
60 
50 
40 






y^\ 


/ \ 


* 








1996 1997 1998 







LARCENY 




700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 






■ 




^»- B 












1996 1997 1998 







BREAKING & ENTERING 




130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 






■ ^ 




^s. 


^V^ 




a 
























1996 1997 1998 





-55- 



Andover Police Department 
3 Year Summary 



1996 1997 1998 3yr Diff. 



Total Incidents 25,501 30,873 28,066 10.06% 



Adult Arrest 365 377 410^ 1 2. 33% 

Juvenile Arrests 27 27 38_ 40.74% 

Total Arrests 392 404 448 14.29% 



Rape 1 4 2 100.00% 



B&E 121 91 83 -31.40% 



Assault 58 77 60 3.45% 



Larceny 607 427 465 -23.39% 



Stolen MV 93 64 69 -25.81% 



Stolen Bicycles 62 37 22 -64.52% 



Domestic Abuse 36 29 25 -30.56% 



MV Fatalities 2 3 1 -50.00% 



MV Accidents 1,318 1,225 1,351 2.50% 



Vandalism 227 213 237 4.41% 



Parking Violations 10,074 8,099 6,524 -35.24% 



MV Citations 3,578 4,194 3,238 -9.50% 



Mileage 400,263 395,546 327,083 -18.28% 



Gasoline 36,020 37,207 32,528 -9.69% 



-56- 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 

1996 1997 1998 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle over two years 

Number of beef cattle under two years 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses (includes work & saddle horses) 

Number of ponies 

Number of goats 

Number of sheep 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



24 


37 


24 


68 


17 


18 

157 


21 


21 


19 


72 


54 


58 





10 


20 


11 


3 





2 


2 


3 





2 


3 


52 


55 


55 


19 


19 


15 


24 


1 


11 


4 


4 


1 


102 


92 


121 


2 


2 


3 



■57- 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive and cost 
effective maintenance services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle 
maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas within their responsibility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and routine maintenance services to 
all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. 
Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects. 

Managing the Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services in all Town buildings. 

Traffic lights 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings 

Town-owned street lighting. 

Town switchboard operations. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Plant and Facilities Department is managed by a Director who is supported by three 
superintendents, an administrative assistant, a temporary construction project manager, a vehicle 
maintenance foreman, a work control center coordinator, a purchasing/inventory coordinator, an 
accounts payable clerk, part-time telephone operators and a diverse group of maintenance workers, 
grounds and trees workers, custodians and vehicle mechanics. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

• Upgraded maintenance management system software 

• Supported Andover High School construction close out 

Completed survey of all Plant & Facilities equipment and systems Town-wide for Y2K 
compliance 

• Updated Town-wide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) policy 
Andover High School track construction oversight 

MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS 

Provided support to preliminary design studies which were completed on the following projects: 

• Public Safety Center 

• New Middle and Elementary School 

• Senior Center 



■58- 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings which total in excess of a million 
square feet. Additionally, they provide custodial services to Town buildings, maintain traffic signals 
and exterior Town-owned light poles and manage all building-related capital projects. 

During 1998 these two divisions completed 3,710 work orders. 

1996 1997 1998 

Town 1,108 1,325 1,158 

School 1,813 2,626 2,552 

MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Rebuilt chimney West Middle School and removed old chimney at West Elementary 

Installed Town-wide water treatment systems (heating and cooling) 

Installed backflow device Town Office building 

Installed cafeteria paddle fans and new exhaust fans at Doherty Middle School 

Installed energy management system at West Elementary School 

West Elementary School fire alarm system and emergency lighting upgraded 

Bancroft School HVAC upgrades - replaced eight exhaust fans, new underground piping, CO 2 

sensors and controls 

Upgraded elevators town wide for ADA compliance 

Y2K surveys and upgrades for HVAC systems, generators, traffic lights and fire alarm systems 

Sanborn School air handler controls upgrade 

Installed new air conditioning system at the Town House 

Upgraded HVAC system at Town Office Building Phase I 

Installed new A/C systems at West Elementary School, computer rooms and School 

Administration Building MDF Room 

Upgraded life safety system at Andover High School 

Andover High School construction punch list 

Sanborn School air handler controls upgrade 

Conducted an electrical power evaluation of the Town Office Building 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

New fuel tanks at Shawsheen and West Elementary Schools 

Two new modular classrooms at Sanborn School 

Shawsheen School modular classroom renovations 

ADA upgrades at multiple locations - ramps, automatic doors signage, door hardware 

Roof replacements at Memorial Hall Library and School Administration Building 

New wood flooring at the Town House function room 

New carpeting at Memorial Hall Library 



■59- 



Senior Center flooring and kitchen upgrade 

Rebuild exterior stairs at Memorial Hall Library and Town Offices and pavers at the Town 

House 

New press boxes and bleacher seating at Andover High School Lovely Field 

New carpeting at the Collins Center 

Andover High School Field House shades 

New flooring in seven classrooms at West Middle School 

Replaced five sections of wood fencing at Wood Park 

New lock system Public Safety Center 

Installed masonry wall Sanborn School playground 

Sound proofing Doherty Middle School Music Room 

Town Yard Fuel Depot - new fuel pumps and tank monitoring system installed 

Sanborn School media room wall 

Replaced West Middle School auditorium fire curtain 

New carpeting West Elementary School pods 

Andover High School construction punch list 

Bancroft School rain shelter 

South School flooring in teacher's room 

Enlarged overhead door at West Fire Station 

Exterior painting and signage Town and School Administration Buildings 

Modifications to Human Resources Office and File Room 

Pomps Pond roof 

Installed window and stairwell guards at Andover High School 

PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They 
share certain pieces of equipment and work together on special projects. As with any public agency 
with manpower, special equipment and vehicles in its inventory, the three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties such as providing support 
to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, 
fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, ice control, snow removal and moving 
extraordinarily heavy objects such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area. 

PARKS 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1.4 million square feet of lawn 
areas. Ballfields are located on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Playground, upper and lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green and the Deyermond Field. 
Lawn areas include the grounds of all Town and School buildings, parks, playgrounds and designated 
islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed and lined) 
for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, 
overseeding, liming, fertilizing and controlling weeds and insects. Pesticide operations are conducted 
by trained and licensed personnel using approved pesticides and methods. This division also 
maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and cuts back brush encroaching upon 
ballfields and recreation areas. 



■60- 



PARKS & GROUNDS ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Ballardvale Green irrigation system 

Andover High School punch list - plantings and re-seeding 

Coordinated installation of new irrigation systems at South & Sanborn Schools 

Implemented new field maintenance program 

Implemented new snow removal program for Town buildings 

CEMETERY 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. The 
cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1998, 
there were 84 burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, 
Town-wide snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment and other tasks such as trash in 
Recreation Park and drainage and construction work at other Town facilities. 

CEMETERY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

• Implemented new grounds maintenance program 

• 84 burials and cremation internments performed 

FORESTRY 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the roadside, on School 
property and other Town-owned land. The majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing 
storm damage, flatclearing areas of undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections 
and curves for improved visibility. The Forestry Division also mows roadsides throughout the Town 
and maintains the Bald Hill compost site. 

FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

• Conducted a Town-wide tree survey 

• Conducted a downtown area tree inventory 

• Skateboard Park construction 

• Planted 29 new trees 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a working foreman and provides maintenance 
to all Town vehicles and major pieces of equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW 
trucks and equipment, Plant and Facilities trucks and equipment and other support vehicles. This 
division processed 969 work orders in 1998.* 

• The reduction in work order from the prior year reflects the new PM program (more work is 
performed each time a vehicle comes in for maintenance). 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENT 

• Implemented new expanded preventative maintenance system 

-61- 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 

This division of the Department of Municipal Maintenance is responsible for scheduling and 
renting school facilities during after school hours, as well as scheduling and renting school and town 
athletic fields, Recreation Park, and the Town House function facility on Main Street. 

TOWN HOUSE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Installed a new computerized tracking system 

Implemented a more equitable scheduling structure for Town and School field rentals 
• Established quarterly meetings with the Parks & Grounds Superintendent and representatives of 
Andover Youth Leagues which resulted in private funding for three school field irrigation systems 

SCHOOLS 

The overall number of school rentals and uses during FY 98 was up 25 % from the year before, 
which reflects the growing enrollment and space needs for the youth sports leagues, the availability 
of Andover High School space that were not available the year before due to the addition and 
renovation project. Overall, gymnasium spaces continued to comprise the majority of the rental and 
scheduling contracts, with use of the auditoriums, cafeterias and other spaces making up the 
remainder of the scheduled uses. Figures below do not included rentals or uses of the Andover High 
School athletic fields, gymnasium, field house or Collins Center, which are scheduled through the 
school athletic and administration offices. 

1997 1998 



Permits Issued: 


4,190 


5,264 


Dept. of Community Services 


36.3% 


43.2% 


Private Rentals 


39.7% 


39.3% 


School Events 


24% 


17.5% 



FIELDS 

School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to capacity in 1998 due to the growing 
number of participants in youth and adult sports leagues, the Town's Department of Community 
Service's and Andover Youth Services' sports programs. 

The overall number of scheduled uses was up 30 %, from 2,323 uses in 1997 to 3,106 uses in 
1998. This number includes the placement of makeshift smaller practice fields in open spaces 
between established fields as well as the growing number of participants in DCS, AYS and youth 
league sports. Youth athletic leagues such as the Little League and Andover Soccer Association 
continued to comprise the majority of field rentals with scheduling for youth football, girls softball, 
adult sports leagues, Town-sponsored recreation programs and very few private rentals making up 
the remainder of uses. 



■62- 



FIELDS (Cont.) 

1997 1998 



Permits Issued: 


2,323 


3,016 


Youth Leagues 


81.2% 


81.8% 


Dept. of Community Services/ 






Andover Youth Services 


12.5% 


14.8% 


Private Rentals/ Adult Leagues 


6.3% 


3.4% 



RECPARK 

Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from May to October. During 
weekday evenings, the Park's softball field and tennis courts are scheduled for Department of 
Community Services tennis classes, recreational programs and a co-ed softball league. The total 
number of scheduled uses was down 15 % in 1998. This represents the drop from 17 youth league 
Rec Park uses in 1997 to 9 uses in 1998 when more school ball fields became available following the 
completion of the South School and Sanborn School additions. 

1997 1998 



Rentals/Uses: 


191 


166 


Dept. of Community Services 


134 


119 


Youth Leagues 


17 


9 


Private Renters 


40 


38 


OLD TOWN HALL 







The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to rent by municipal/school 
groups, residents and non-residents for special events since February 1990. The total number of 
events scheduled, including Town and School day time usage as well as evening and weekend rentals 
was down slightly compared to 1997, however, the income generated in 1998 was up 8.75 % over 
the past fiscal year. This is due mainly to the fee increases implemented July 1, 1997. 



i997 1998 



Rentals: 
Residents 
School/Municipal 
Non-Residents 



92 


70 


47 


44 


35 


24 


10 


2 



-63- 



PLANT & FACILITIES STATISTICS 



3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 




FIELD RENTALS 






■ 




\ / 












1994 


1995 1996 1997 


1998 





SCHOOL BUILDING 
USE PERMITS 




1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 



3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
500 




♦••' 



WORK ORDERS 



... ■©». ^ 



1995 1996 

— ■— Town ,, °- Vehicle 
-■♦— School 



1997 





GRAVE SITES 


250 
200 
150 
100 
50 

n 






1 i 


/\ 


y \s^~ 


"~~ 




U 




1995 


1996 1997 1998 



-64- 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of life 
by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (water and solids) and 
provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and bids, 
performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: Sewer 
Construction on Mayflower Road, Standish Circle, Reservation Road and Miles Circle; the 
completion of new water mains on Tewksbury Street, Marland Street and Oak Street; roadway 
reconstruction on Center Street; the reconstruction of sidewalks on Center Street, Oak Street, 
Marland Street, and Moraine Street; the replacement of old guardrail on portions of the Lowell 
Street, High Street, Dascomb Road, River Road, Woburn Street, Shawsheen Road, Ballardvale Road, 
and twelve other various streets; and the installation and repair of storm drains on Livingston Circle, 
Center Street, Chestnut Street, Larchmont Circle and nine other various locations. The division also 
performed field surveys and final designs to prepare for upcoming construction projects such as the 
sidewalk reconstruction on Locke Street, High Street and William Street and Sewer Construction on 
Balmoral Street and Rock O'Dundee Road. 

Preliminary work was performed with the Town's consultant for the design of the future 
sewer extensions for the South Main Street Area, Ballardvale Road Area and Rogers Brook Area. 
Staff members also assisted and coordinated with consultants on the design of other construction 
projects such as the Main Street Corridor Improvements; Brook Street and Chestnut Street Relief 
Sewers; Drainage Improvements off River Street and repairs to the Husseys Pond Dam, River Street 
Bridge and Harold Parker Road Bridge. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of fifty-seven Town streets was prepared in 1998 
while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on fifty-two 
of these streets. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the Planning 
Board checking for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of proposed roads and 
utilities. All roads and utilities in new subdivisions such as Regency Heights, Pine Cone Lane, Steeple 
Court, Minuteman Park and numerous other sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance 
with Town construction standards. Plans and repairs for street acceptance were completed on 
Colonial Drive, Patriot Drive and David Drive. Performance Bond amounts were also calculated as 
requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities, 
including many such excavations by the Bay State Gas Company, Bell Atlantic, Mass Electric and 
Media One contractors, were issued through this division and the necessary utility markouts and 
inspections were carried out. 



-65- 



The Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed the necessary copies 
for other Town Departments. The staff also provided and maintained records of various utilities, 
street excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 



1996 



1997 



1998 



Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 

Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Guardrail Replaced/installed (ft.) 

Streets Resurfaced (miles) 

Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 

Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of Health 

Assessors Maps updated 

Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans / # lots) 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 

Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 

Subdivision Construction Inspections/Tests: 

Water mains (ft.) 

Sewer mains (ft.) 

Drain lines (ft.) 

Sidewalks (ft.) 

Roads Paved: 
Binder coarse (ft.) 
Top coarse (ft.) 



4,774 


2,232 


3,870 





1,990 


2,490 








3,970 


681 


20,550 


1,950 








19,200 


18.2 


12.3 


16.3 


483 


278 


198 


74 


67 


47 


63 


71 


59 


20/183 


26/97 


26/146 


14 


12 


8 


11 


15 


14 


14,309 


18,211 


17,121 


5,414 


7,000 


6,000 


2,589 


3,421 


10,547 


3,935 


5,301 


4,370 


4,103 


5,208 


7,112 


8,256 


9,270 


6,587 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for the road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing, of two hundred and fifty plus miles of existing roads. During the Spring and Summer, 
two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after winter sanding. Both sweepers 
start each morning at 5:00 a.m.. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its 
inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed, and is responsible for 
the maintenance and replacement of all Town drainage systems, including catch basins, storm drains 
and Town brooks. The Highway Division with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of the 
Public Works Department and Department of Plant & Facilities, is also responsible for snow removal, 
ice control and flood control for all Town roads. 



Number of streets resurfaced 60 
Miles of roads resurfaced 
Feet of berms constructed 



1996 



1997 



1998 



57 


37 


52 


18.2 


12.3 


16.3 


4,370 


1,335 


6,075 



•66- 



1,477 


528 


957 


10 


12 


17 


27 


46 


31 


2 


2 


3 



1996 1997 1998 

Catch basins cleaned 
Storm drains cleaned 
Catch basins repaired 
Storm drains repaired 

SOLID WASTE 

Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse 
transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover, where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines, junk mail, paper board metal containers, glass, and the 
voluntary drop-off program collecting #1, #2 plastics and aluminum materials. The Town also 
maintains a leaf and grass clippings compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the 
compost material being available to Town residents. 

1996 1997 1998 

Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of newspapers/magazines recycled 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 

Tons of #1 & 2 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 

WATER 

The Water Division is responsible for water supply, treatment, meter reading, billing and 
distribution of safe drinking water to the community. The water system consists of a 24 million gallon 
per day treatment facility, two pumping stations and six distribution storage tanks. Over two billion 
gallons of water was processed in 1998. 

During the year the water division worked to ensure the quality of drinking water and its 
compliance with all state and federal regulations. The standards for organic contaminants, inorganic 
chemicals and radioactivity are very stringent. We are pleased to report that Andover' s supply 
complies with all standards specified by the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Department of 
Environmental Protection at the State and Federal levels. 

The Water Treatment Plant staff operates and maintains water treatment and the ozonation 
facility on an average of ten hours per day off peak and twenty-four hours a day during high demand. 
Other responsibilities include monitoring of the fifteen million gallon per day Fishbrook Pumping 
Station, Bancroft Station, and the Shawsheen waste water collection/pumping system. Our certified 
laboratory staff ensures testing and monitoring techniques to maintain system compliance. The 
treatment facilities operate 365 days per year. 

-67- 



10,720 


11,586 


11,75: 


2,157 


2,300 


2,213 


458 


484 


431 


7 


8 


7 


1,337 


2,000 


2,200 


37 


40 


39 


5 


4 


5 



1996 



1997 



1998 



Hydrants Repaired 

Hydrants Replaced 

Hydrants Flushed 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 

House Service Leaks Repaired 

House Services Renewed 

Water Main Taps 

New Water Meters Installed 

Old Water Meters Replaced 

Water Meters Repaired 

Water Shut Offs/Turn On 

Gate Boxes Adjusted 

Gallons of water treated (in millions) 

Average daily gallons pumped (in million gallons) 

Maximum day (in million gallons) 



58 


34 


36 


8 


1 





9 


7 


1 


26 


16 


19 


14 


30 


18 


10 


12 


3 


4 


10 


4 


118 


160 


134 


114 


138 


121 


3 


12 


5 


181 


224 


188 


58 


55 


46 


1,952 


2,074 


2,075 


4.941 


5.093 


5.004 



11.232 



10.430 



13.949 



SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood St., West Elementary School, 
Shawsheen Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 70 miles 
of sanitary sewers and 5,062 connections. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village 
Pumping Station is collected and transported by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence 
and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's regional wastewater treatment plant. 



1996 



1997 



1998 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 43 


39 


47 


Sewer Main Rodded - Maintenance 1 


12 


8 


Sewer Mains Repaired 2 


5 


2 


Sewer Services Cleared 1 6 


15 


13 


GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 







The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide service 
to residential, commercial and industrial users. Since its initial operation in April 1977, the facility 
has treated 248 billion gallons of wastewater that was previously discharged, untreated, into the 
Merrimack River. The plant is currently staffed by 44 people. The operation is continuous 24 hours 
per day and 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



Andover's daily average flow to the 
Sanitary District (in millions of gallons) 



1996 



3.565 



1997 



3.660 



1998 



3.786 



-68- 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 




SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING 
COLLECTION 



14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

4,000 




1996 



1997 



1998 



f2 Refuse 

I Newspapers / Magazines 

□ Glass 



2,500 

2,000 

co 1,500 
z 

o 

I- 1,000 



RECYCLING DROP OFF 





1996 



1997 



1998 



Leaves & Grass 
Plastics #1 and #2 



-69- 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 

Eric J. Nadworny, Chairman 
Frank M. Eccles, Secretary 
Richard J. Collins 
Tina B. Cirdwood 
Timothy M. McCarron 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 01810 
(978) 623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



CLAUDIA L. BACH. Ed.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 



ANNUAL REPORT 

1998 
Andover School Department 



During 1998, student population in the Andover Public Schools continued to rise with the total 
student count on October 1 at 5698, which was 70 students higher than the October, 1997 report 
at 5628. In turn, the 1997 report was higher by 127 students than the year before, October, 1996. 
Populations at the high school were higher than projected at 1478. The middle schools actually 
saw a decrease from 1408 down to 1394, but the elementary school numbers rose from 2816 to 
2826. The students, along with more than 600 professional and support staff continued to be 
housed in one 9-12 high school, two 6-8 middle schools, four K-5 elementary schools, and one 
K-2 controlled choice school. The five elected School Committee members who establish the 
policy of the school system meet at least twice monthly. The FY' 98 appropriation of 
$33,537,152 permitted the school department to move forward in several areas described below. 
The professional staff continued to provide a high quality educational experience to the students 
of the Andover Public Schools. 

During 1998 the comprehensive construction project at the high school was completed, and in 
the fall, 1998, classes, athletics and all other programs for students and staff at the high school 
were in full operation in a facility not undergoing construction. The Collins Center was the site 
for several performances sponsored by the schools and by various organizations in the Town. A 
manager, to be employed by the school system, will oversee operations and a drama program in 
1999. 

The School Committee voted to withdraw the warrant from Town Meeting for funding for 
construction of a new 5-8 middle school in West Andover. In late spring the School Committee 
created a Space Needs Task Force, comprised of two School Committee members, two Finance 
Committee members, two Selectman, Town Project Manager, Superintendent, Assistant 
Superintendent, and Business Administrator. The Task Force met during the summer and fall, 
and during that period contracted the services of three groups or individuals for long term (five to 
ten-year) enrollment projections, determined the capacities for the middle and elementary 
schools, and held open forums to solicit public input. In the fall, the Task Force presented to the 
School Committee its report which included seven options which would meet the space needs for 
the next 5 or so years. On November 10 the School Committee voted to build two new schools, 
an elementary school for 564 students and a middle school for 450 students both to be located 
on Cross Street in West Andover. 



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School Committee and Central Administration 

With the announcement by Richard Neal that he would retire, effective June 30, 1998, the School 
Committee conducted a search for a new superintendent. The search process included input and 
participation from a wide spectrum of the school community and the community-at-large. The 
new Superintendent, Dr. Claudia L. Bach, was selected by the School Committee in March and 
began her duties on July 1, 1998. 

Following the annual meeting in March, the Andover School Committee welcomed Mr. Richard 
Collins as a new member and Ms. Tina Girdwood as a re-elected member. At its first meeting, 
Eric Nadworny was elected Chairperson and Mr. Frank Eccles was elected Secretary of the 
Committee. 



In the summer, after the arrival of the new superintendent, the Committee and administration 
developed the Goals and Objectives for the 1998-99 school year. They are as follows: 



Over-riding Goal: 
Working Goals: 



Ensure exemplary schools for our children 
Keep it simple. Make it inspired. 



Goal l:Base all decisions under the basic assumption that each child is a constant learner 

Objective 1 Create an atmosphere where children are eager to learn 

Objective 2 Ensure that all students are challenged and engaged 
Goal 2: Make schools exemplary in areas of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and support 

services, exceeding state standards where possible 

Objective 1 Continue to develop the High School courses standards and benchmarks in 
the major disciplines 

Objective 2 Evaluate and revise the K-8 standards and benchmarks 

Objective 3 Ensure that technology focuses on improving teaching and learning 

Objective 4 Develop ways to improve and demonstrate accountability among all staff 

Objective 5 Review class size policy 

Objective 6 Review levels of student/administrative support services 

Objective 7 Align professional development program with Ed Reform Act 
Goal 3: Commit to developing and maintaining exemplary facilities 

Objective 1 Eliminate overcrowding 

Objective 2 Provide the best learning environments at every school 

Objective 3 Strive for equitable facilities 
Goal 4:Promote positive and productive working relationships among all members of the school 

community. 

Objective 1 Promote respect among all parties and encourage civility 

Objective 2 Promote professionalism throughout the school community 

Objective 3 Improve the working relationship among members of the Andover 
Education Association, administrators, and the School Committee 

Objective 4 Increase teacher/community interaction 

Objective 5 Encourage shared site-based decision-making 
Goal 5: Continue to improve community confidence in our school system 

Objective 1 Raise community awareness of overall goals and objectives, 

Objective 2 Focus community attention on schools 

Objective 3 Encourage more public participation 

Objective 4 Promote civility 



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In addition to a new superintendent, the school department brought on board Mr. Larry Robinson 
to replace Ms. Ellen Parker as Andover High School principal. Ms. Parker resigned in the spring 
to accept a position as high school principal in Methuen. Also new at the high school was 
Assistant Principal, Ms. Marilyn Jordan, who replaced Mr. Peter Lueke who resigned in early 
summer. With the resignation of Mary French, Pupil Personnel Director, the district hired Dr. 
Cheri Webb in the spring. Assistant principal positions were added at Bancroft Elementary 
School and South Elementary School, filled by Ms. Brenda O'Brien and Mr. Stephen Jankauskas 
respectively. 

During this past year several initiatives were started or continued which are worthy of note. 
The School Committee adopted the "Andover Curriculum Standards and Benchmarks" for 
grades kindergarten through grade nine in the areas of English/language arts, mathematics, and 
science and technology. The standards and benchmarks were developed by eighty-two teachers, 
three assistant principals, the high school program advisors, and the elementary and middle 
school principals during the past two years. This outstanding curriculum initiative delineates 
what Andover students should know and be able to do and is based on Andover expectations for 
learning and the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. A pilot assessment program in 
mathematics and science also was implemented as a means to measure each student against these 
grade level performance benchmarks. Other curriculum improvements included the 
implementation of a new math program in grades two, seven, and eight; the adoption and 
implementation of a formalized penmanship program for the elementary schools; and the 
implementation of the final physical science unit at the fifth grade. 

Andover students in grades four, eight, and ten took the first Massachusetts Comprehensive 
Assessment System (MCAS) exams in English, mathematics, and science and technology. The 
intent of the assessments is to raise academic standards across the Commonwealth and to make 
schools and students accountable. This first administration of the examination was based on the 
curriculum frameworks developed by the state and with which the Andover Public Schools have 
been working in order to align local curriculum and instruction to state standards. Since schools 
in Andover are just beginning to integrate the curriculum frameworks in the local curriculum, we 
must view this year's scores as a benchmark by which we can measure future improvement year 
by year, student by student, and school by school. 

The baseline test scores reveal that many Andover student scores are generally above the state 
average in all three subject areas: English, mathematics, and science and technology. We also 
had a number of students who scored in the 'needs improvement" category and some in the 
"failing" category. Overall, Andover ranked 1 8 th in the state on the first MCAS tests. 
The MCAS results provided much data to be analyzed. Andover expects to use the MCAS results 
in three ways: (1) analyze the results for implications regarding individual students, to guide 
further the district's curriculum and instruction, and to develop policies and programs for 
additional student support. 

The School Committee initiated a series of workshops which were for the purpose of having 
more in-depth information and in-depth discussion on areas of importance. Two of these were 
held in 1998, immediately following school committee meetings. One was to explore the 
possibility of creating additional After School Programs, and the other was an informational 
workshop to provide the community with materials and data on the MCAS test. The After 
Schools Program workshop resulted in the creation of a committee, made up of representatives 
from various organizations currently providing after schools programs and activities for children 
and other interested individuals. 

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Business Office 

The primary responsibility of the Business Office is development and oversight of the Annual 
School Budget. This includes such things as monitoring expenditures, administering the 
financial provisions of labor contracts, purchasing, preparation of a five year financial forecast, 
development of a five year Capital Improvement Program and tracking grant awards and 
disbursements. In addition to financial oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities 
management, system- wide data processing, student transportation and food services. 

The Business Office is also engaged in several projects of note: 

• Upgrading the technological capabilities of the Business Office. New equipment was 
purchased in 1997 and new financial management software was purchased in 1998. The 
payroll system has been converted and accounts payable will be converted in early 1999. 
This conversion to new financial management software is being conducted with the Town. 

• Elementary and Middle School Facilities Expansion. The Business Office provides valuable 
data (enrollment projections, etc.) to the School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools 
and town personnel which assists in the planning to address existing overcrowded schools 
and provide adequate student space in the future. 

• Building Maintenance. A five year capital and extraordinary maintenance plan is annually 
updated. In conjunction with the Department of Plant and Facilities, priorities are set and 
cost estimates established. Major items are included as part of the town's annual Capital 
Improvement Plan. 

• Upgrading Student Management Software. The Information Systems (formally, data 
processing) adjunct of the Business Office continues to coordinate the review and evaluation 
of new student management software. All building managers and guidance personnel were 
involved. New software has been installed at the high school and is continually being 
evaluated. It is anticipated that this same software will be installed at the other schools in the 
near future. 

Human Resource Office 

Below are the highlights of 1998 in the Human Resource Department: 

• Added Human Resource Secretary to our staff to assist with the ever increasing volume of 
work in the office. 

• Recruited and hired approximately 184 people for the school department and 36 for the town 
departments. Notable new hires for the school department include Superintendent of 
Schools, new High School principal and assistant principal, Director of Pupil Personnel 
Services, new elementary assistant principals, new system-wide heath coordinator, new 
program advisor in the high school math department and 58 new teachers. Other hires 
included instructional assistants, secretaries, custodians, food service workers, and substitute 
teachers. Among the notable new hires for the Town of Andover were the Superintendent of 
Parks and Grounds, a Management/Financial Analyst, a Veteran's Agent, an Assistant Health 
Director, three firefighters, one police officer and other key support personnel throughout the 
organization. 

• Completed work on a two-year classification and compensation study for all positions in 
town government, including a comprehensive review and rewrite of all town job descriptions 
and position classifications within the plan. 

• Continued to provide town and school training on a number of important topics including: 
Drug and Alcohol Abuse with respect to the Town's Drug and Alcohol Testing Policy for 
supervisors and employees with commercial driver's licenses; employee wellness training in 
the area stress management; management training in the areas of: understanding and 

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improving communication skills, employee performance evaluations, and in identifying 
appropriate interventions for problem employees; and training co-hosted with the Andover 
Teachers Association on the issue of teacher recertification. 

• In concert with the Town of Andover 's Americans with Disability Action Team (Joe 
Piantedosi, Ken Parker, Dave Harding, Kaija Gilmore and Bernie Turtle) reviewed, rewrote, 
and produced the ADA Policy and Procedural Guidelines with respect to a variety of ADA 
related issues. 

• As a member community in Personnel Administrators for Affirmative Action Collaboration, 
represented PAC for Affirmative Action at recruitment fairs held in New York City and 
Boston whose goal is to enhance the number of minority teachers in our applicant pools. 

• Assisted the School Committee and Superintendent with the collective bargaining process for 
school contracts. 

• Put on-line with the new software system, MUNIS, and e-mail. 

• As always, we are indebted to our Tax Voucher Volunteer Barbara Haefling for her 
enormous contribution to the work in our department. 

School Reports 

Andover High School 

• Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department launched several new initiatives for the 1998-99 academic year: 
orientation night for parents of eighth graders, group counseling programs for new and at-risk 
students, smoking cessation group, peer mediation program and after school discussion group for 
boys. The successful Choice, Not Chance college planning program for juniors continued. 

• Social Studies Department 

The Social Studies Department continued to align the curriculum with the Massachusetts State 
Frameworks. The department wrote the ninth grade curriculum guide. Members of the 
department participated in the following professional development programs: Native American 
Studies, Peer Mentoring, The Skillful Teacher, Curriculum Development, NERC (Northeast 
Regional Social Studies Conference) as presenters and participants. Other activities included: 
Mock Trial & Amnesty International, Merrimack College teaching program, and enrichment 
opportunities such as house field trip to hear author/historian Howard Zinn. 

• The English Department 

Now fully in line with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, the new 9th grade curriculum 
formed the first part of a two year sequence leading directly to the MCAS. Over the summer, 
another small group met to put together a new 10 th grade curriculum which aligns itself with both 
the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the new history curriculum, also delineated in 
the Frameworks. The English Curriculum for 10 th grade will be complete by June. This year we 
also launched a new course entitled, "Diverse Views as Seen Through Literature" which deals 
with different cultural voices not usually heard in the English classroom. 

• World Language Department 

The World Language Department will introduce two new courses next year: an introductory 
Latin class and Latin IV. Department members continue to perfect their skills in the use of the 
language lab. We recently had a computer installed in the lab. 

• The Mathematics Department 

This year the Math Department has incorporated two new math courses into its curriculum. The 
Math Curriculum Council is putting together an assessment system K-12 to replicate the MCAS. 
An Advanced Placement Statistics course which will enable our students who have successfully 
completed Algebra II, level 1, to receive college credit for Statistics by taking Advanced 

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Placement Exam in the spring. An introductory course in Programming C++ that will lead to a 
course in Advanced Placement C++ which will begin next year. The high school sub-committee 
is working on improvements on the Geometry Pilot Exam that was given last spring. They also 
developed an Algebra II Pilot Exam that was given at the end of Semester 1 . In the fall we 
administered the Mathematics League Massachusetts Olympiad round 1 Exam to all of our 
advanced mathematics sophomores, juniors and seniors. In February the advanced mathematics 
juniors and seniors participated in the AMHSME (American High School Math Exam). 

• The Science Department 

Biology and chemistry classes have implemented the updated versions of the computer 
simulation software series from Logal, and probeware from Vernier. The updated versions 
include class networking capabilities and the use of student portfolios. The A.H.S. Science team 
is currently ranked fourth in the North Shore Science League. The team consists of science 
students from grades 9-12 who compete against students from approximately 40 schools in 
events ranging from basic scientific knowledge to sophisticated problem solving. Eight students 
from Chet Orban's Oceanography and Marine Biology class prepared to compete in the Ocean 
Bowl on February 27, 1999. This competition sponsored by the New England Aquarium, tests 
teams on their knowledge of topics in Oceanography, and Marine Biology. 

Doherty Middle School 

During the past year, we sought to enhance instruction at Doherty Middle School. Our intent 
was to provide Doherty' s students with the best possible preparation of the district's curriculum 
frameworks in anticipation of MCAS testing. At the team level, the teachers looked to increase 
their use of the double-period option, which allows for more interdisciplinary work and greater 
in-depth instruction. At the department level the teachers received the MCAS results and 
focused on skill areas that were shown to need improvement. In anticipation of this year's test, 
all of Doherty' s teachers received training in the LINKS Program. In addition, many of our 
teachers participated in the John Collins seminars to improve writing skills. The 1998 MCAS 
test results showed that Doherty Middle School ranked in the top two percent of all the middle 
schools in Massachusetts. 

Performance-based education, being a fundamental part of middle school instruction, we sought 
to increase the number of opportunities for students to publicly demonstrate their learning. The 
following is a partial list of the demonstration events that have occurred at Doherty this past 
year: Biography Day, the Boston Tea Party, Hero Day, Text-Image-Text, Wind Car Contest, 
Traditions Day, Pre-Columbian Art Day, Grade 6 Science Fair, Sports Interviews, Mystery 
Games, "How To" Book Reports, Mythology Skits, Bio-Cell Demonstration, Poetry in the Park, 
Academic Fair, Habitat Fair, Bridge Design and Construction, Mini Olympics (Countries on 
Display), Animals-Myths and Monsters, Medieval Fair, Winter and Spring Concerts, Integrated 
Arts Night, Spring Open-House. 

West Middle School 

This year's focus brought an increase and expansion of School-Community Connections at 
West Middle School. A wide variety of programs offered within the school day afford 
our students with exposure to businesses and resources within the community. 

• West students continue to teach elementary age youngsters appreciation of differences and 
disability awareness, with our "Kids on the Block" puppeteers program. 

• Twenty-five grade 8 young women will attend the Women in Science Conference at the 
University of Lowell, accompanied by Mrs. Barbara Neal. 



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Konjoian's Greenhouse has again opened its doors to our grade 6 student gardeners. Funded 

by a grant from the Massachusetts Agricultural Society's Agriculture in the Classroom 

program. 

The Museum of Science awarded the grade 8 teaching team of Barbara Neal, Dolores 

Laughlin, Becky Franks, Todd Fawcett and John Heidenrich the honor of becoming 

instructors at the museum. 

Archeological techniques were a focus for grade 8 students as they receive training through 

Phillips Andover School's Peabody Museum outreach program. 

Twenty grade 8 Western Warrior students visited Channel 68 television station as a part of 

Critical Viewers Week in March, sponsored by The National Academy of Television Arts 

and Sciences. 

Forty grade 7 and 8 Future Scientists and Engineers benefited from the mentorship of real 

life engineers from TASC, Inc. in Reading. 

Our community service students regularly offered time and services as book buddies at 

Sanborn and West Elementary schools, and as assistants at Wingate and the Children's 

Handicapped Center. 

As participants in the PALMS sponsored workshop on portfolio assessment students on the 

grade 6 Discovery Team and grade 8 Western Warriors team had a chance to have their work 

graded by teachers from the surrounding area. 

The grade 8 Western Warriors team adopted the Somerville "Short Stop Homeless 

Shelter" at the holiday season. 

Discovery Team and A Team cooperated with EDC Educational Services in 

Newton to field test. The Knowledge Navigator program was implemented as students 

created research papers in social science classes. 

Grade 7 team teachers John Fawcett, Joan Zenofsky, Bennie Ebersole, Les Taylor 

and Rene Drueke were selected by the Tsongas Center to participate in a summer program 

developing curriculum using project based techniques of instruction. The Amigos team 

students studied the nature of adolescence in early industrialized American society, using 

primary source materials from both the Lowell Mills and Sturbridge Village Historical 

Society. 

• The Salem Historical Society invited Discovery Team teacher Sue Rogers to create 
middle school curricula as part of a two day workshop opportunity. 

• Grade 8 classes visited the Saugus Ironworks for the second year, as a part of then- 
study of the Industrial Revolution and Simple Machines science unit. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

Our theme for this school year was, "Expanding Our Horizons Through Communications" We 
brought this theme to life through: Curriculum/ Professional Development Lighthouse 
Technology Grant - 

Once again this year we received a Lighthouse Technology Grant, an award of thirty 
thousand dollars. We were able to purchase three more classroom sets of Alpha -Smarts. We 
targeted grades three, four and five. 

Notable achievements due to this grant were: 

• Eleven of our fourth grade students had their poems selected for publication in an anthology 
entitled A Celebration of New England's Young Poets. 

• The Lighthouse team selected to mentor Triton Regional and Woburn Schools. 

This team was created to analyze our M.C.A.S. results and develop an action plan to address 
areas indicating where improvement is needed and to recognize programs now in place that 

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contribute to our successes. The team is comprised of teachers at each grade level and learning 
specialist, assistant principal and principal. 

We made a big push to have all of our staff on the same page in terms of the parameters of 
teaching and the evaluation process. We had a total of twenty-one teachers who participated in 
this course. 

We had some wonderful sharing during our staff meetings: 

• Irene Crane presented on M.C.A.S. Irene was a scorer for this assessment 

• Deb Hall, Donna Lubarsky and Barbara Noga presented their booklet, Every Child Can 
Learn on classroom modifications 

• Tech team presented on the use of the Alpha-Smarts across the curriculum 

• Rick Irving presented on conferencing strategies . 

Each staff member was provided with a professional portfolio at the first meeting of the year. It 
included many professional resources. 

Our biggest successes this year were: 

• Our first annual Title One Family Pizza Night 

• Opening of our Parent Information Center 

• Family Science Night 

• Math-Technology Family night 

• Before school program, A.C.E. (Academically Challenging Curriculum) sponsored and 
presented by parents. 

Air quality was monitored regularly. New vents were placed in spaces converted to meet our 
growing staff needs. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

All decisions at Sanborn School are made with the school's values in mind: respect, 
responsibility, resourcefulness and reflection, and always in terms of what's best for children. 
Staffing and the deployment of space are examples of this. The Sanborn School provided 
education to 486 students in 1998. In order to keep class size within School Committee 
guidelines and provide for optimal learning conditions, all classrooms were used for regular 
education instruction, as well as two modular classrooms and the staff room. All classes fell 
within School Committee guidelines for class size, though grade three classes were large at 26: 1 . 
The staff consisted of 21 regular and 2 special education classroom teachers as well as additional 
full or part-time art, music, technology, physical education, media, English as a Second 
Language and learning disabilities specialists. A partition was built to divide one large space 
and the staff shared another space to allow for dedicated music and art rooms, areas we find 
essential for exemplary instruction. 

In order to meet the diverse learning needs of our students, regular, special needs and reading 
support in the form of paraprofessionals was increased slightly. Contact time with students was 
maximized through careful scheduling. The faculty and staff received inservice training for new 
programs including some science units, handwriting instruction and the new technology 
integration program. Additional coursework included training in areas concerned with meeting 
the various needs of students in inclusive classrooms and training in raising achievement by 
setting criteria. 

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In honor of 1998 being declared the International Year of the Ocean by the United Nations, the 
Sanborn School followed suit and developed the year-long theme, Dive Into Learning; It's 
Oceans of Fun. Through vocabulary development, research opportunities, reading incentives, 
and art and music activities, the students learned about the ocean as an ecosystem, the diversity 
of life within the oceans and the endangered ocean life. Our theme added additional excitement 
and challenge to the curriculum. 

Our students continued to do well according to all indicators of success. State test scores at 
grade three indicated that 92% of our students scored within the proficient or advanced reading 
categories (37% at advanced). Students in fourth grade did well on the MCAS tests compared to 
the state averages, scoring in the top twenty-five fourth grades across the state. A great deal of 
time was expended by the faculty in analyzing our students' strengths and weaknesses according 
to the test results and making plans for adjusting our instruction and curriculum. 

School spirit was high amongst students, teachers and parents. Over 200 parents volunteered in 
some capacity or another helping the faculty and staff offer the kind of programming we feel is 
so important for young children. One social fund raiser alone allowed the parents to purchase 
and install a communications sign board for the school as well as a new play structure for the 
students. 

• 1 998-wide curriculum stressed the school values respect, responsibility, resourcefulness and 
reflection through the theme Dive Into Learning; It's Oceans of Fun. 

• School receives $8000 to explore Dr. William Glasser's Choice Theory. 

• School installs computerized weather station. 

• Overcrowding required the installation of two modular classrooms and the use of the staff 
room as a classroom. 

• One room was partitioned and another shared with the staff to allow for dedicated music and 
art space. 

• Parents continued to play significant role in and out of the classroom. One fundraiser raised 
funds to install a communication sign and a new play structure. 

• Initial participation in Odyssey of the Mind yielded six teams. 

• Active Student Council involved all students in grades four and five in supporting Bolivian 
child through Child Reach as well as other civic projects. 

• Other community projects included Harvest Festival (elderly outreach), UNICEF (children's 
fund) and Jump Rope for Heart (heart research). 

Shawsheen Elementary School 

This year Shawsheen' s school-wide theme was space exploration. Space related riddles of the 
week were aired on Channel 10 to encourage family involvement. STARLAB, a traveling 
planetarium, provided children the opportunity to view a simulated night sky and learn to 
recognize stars and constellations. NASA astronaut, Dr. Janice Voss, a scientist who had orbited 
the earth 25 1 times, shared her experiences which included scientific experiments and a 
rendezvous with the Russian space station Mir. In June, the second graders presented an operatic 
tale Comet . The Cleanser of the Universe, at the Collins Center. This delightful production 
enhanced their learning and reinforced their knowledge of the solar system. 

Children had their own books published and first graders read them to their parents at the 
Author's Tea. A grant of color printers from Hewlett-Packard and an Andover Fund for 
Education grant to buy Easy Book Deluxe enhanced the publishing center. In addition, an 
Andover Education Improvement Grant submitted by Shawsheen 's teachers provided wooden 

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blocks and storage cabinets for all Andover kindergarten classrooms. Jerry Silverman 
coordinated the project with help from the Greater Lawrence Vocational School. 

All classroom teachers participated in staff development during the summer and the Tech Works 
Program in the fall. A year long course entitled Positive Discipline and Effective Class Meetings 
guided teachers in the implementation of classroom meetings which helped children solve 
problems and become better citizens. 

An additional kindergarten class was added in the fall to accommodate increased enrollment at 
that level. The Capital Improvement Plan provided lighting retrofits for the classrooms, 
corridors and offices in the building. The lights are much brighter but less costly. 

When the Shawsheen Extended Daycare Program moved to Phillips Academy, the portable 
building they vacated was remodeled to accommodate three special needs preschool classes. The 
first floor classroom, which had housed preschoolers, became an attractive Media Center for the 
school. 

South Elementary School 

The 1997-98 South School year began with our school theme, "Who I am Makes a Difference." 
Each child and faculty member received a blue ribbon with our theme embossed on it. We had 
many discussions and writing activities incorporating our school theme. Several new teachers 
joined the staff, and the student population was 618. Our school beliefs of respect, 
responsibility, diversity and lifelong learning continued to be our guiding values. 

Collegiality remained a strong element in the South School culture. Teachers throughout the 
year continued to research best practices. Supported by the Andover Staff Development 
Commission and the PTO staff development allocation, staff were afforded opportunities to 
attend workshops and conferences and to visit other classrooms across the state. Professional 
development included assessment, literacy, technology, open-ended questions, and skillful 
teaching technique workshops. Teachers are constantly looking for effective strategies to add to 
their teaching repertoires. 

We thank the Andover School Committee for supporting our staffing initiatives. We added Beth 
Kennedy as our technology resource teacher, Steve Jankauskas as our assistant principal, and one 
more instructional assistant. Our goal was to continue to advocate a strong school culture that 
leads to high achievement, strong relationships among students and teachers, and mutual respect 
for individual differences. Evidence of the culture at South included: the holiday gift giving, the 
food drive, Sub Supper, Curriculum Night, Budding Authors Week, Sock Hop, Community 
Read-along, Teacher Appreciation Day, Children's Book Week, Ice Cream Festival, Celebration 
of Learning Day, and musical presentations at every grade level. 

We were bursting with pride in the achievement of first place by our South Side Singers at the 
All State Music Conference under the direction of Linda O'Donnell; our Odyssey of the Mind 
team winning the regionals and competing in the state competition; and our 35-member Math 
Olympiad team, under the direction of Steve Jankauskas, competing in five Olympiads. Our 
school principal received the Thomas Passios Award/National Distinguished Principal honor 
from the state of Massachusetts. This was an honor celebrated by the South School Community. 
Our students' writing continued to be recognized by the Boston Herald, Environmental 
Protection Agency, Boston College, and the Lawrence Eager Tribune. 

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The strong contribution of $21,500 from the South PTO and over 400 parent volunteers 
continued to make a great difference at South for the staff and children. Parents were involved in 
every aspect of our school community. 

In its second year, the ARC project integrated part of Andover's fifth grade core curriculum with 
authentic learning strategies. By using partnerships between the school and the community 
institutions, students participated in research conducted by those organizations. Initially, the 
Andover Village Improvement Society, the Audubon Society, Genetics Institute, and the 
Peabody Museum of Phillips Academy provided support for teachers and adult mentors to assist 
small groups of students to research meaningful self-selected topics relevant to the curriculum 
topics of Ecosystems, Microworlds, and Archaeology. We believe that this model improved 
independent learning while developing a wide range of academic skills. A summer teacher 
workshop was held, and the development of a web site will lay the groundwork for the potential 
future expansion of ARC to the other schools. 

A special thank you to the Andover Community for supporting our initiatives throughout the 
year. We are all very grateful. South is a wonderful place to be each day, whether teaching or 
learning. 

West Elementary School 

Enrollment at West on December 31, 1998 was 847 for grades K-5, which was an increase of 
nine students from the start of school in the fall and a decrease of seven from the previous year. 
West added two classrooms in grade five and reduced the number of first grade classrooms by 
one. 

The West Elementary Student Council members were involved in many public service activities 
during the year. Among them were: 

• Collected donations of goods and food for the People's Pantry 

• Volunteered their time to work at the People's Pantry 

• Organized school-wide clean-up of grounds 

• Raised $325.00 for charity by holding bake sale 

The second annual WERAWC, West Elementary Readers" and Writers' Conference was held 
during regular school hours in March. Highlights of this week-long celebration of the written 
and spoken word are listed below: 

• Eight storytellers, published authors, and illustrations made appearance at each grade level 

• Twelve member teacher committee worked to organize the event 

• Almost 85% of the parent population attended some part of the WERAWC 

• Students read their own works during publishing parties 

Other school-wide activities in which students participated were: 

• Jump rope for Heart raised program $ 1 ,38 1 .85 

• Easter Seals Shoot Out raised $ 1 ,242 . 3 5 

• Maintained cleanliness of grounds through "Trash Detectors" program 

• Supported school-wide theme of "Sail the 4 Cs" 

• Student-run school store profits provided scholarships for Outdoor Education 

• The Math Olympiad team placed among the top 10% in the world for the fourth straight year, 
competing against teams that included sixth graders 

• Continued the grade 5/Kindergarten buddy program 

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• Senior citizens worked in the school as part of the tax voucher program 

Other highlights for the year were: 

• Twenty-two staff members participated in the course Imagemaking in the Writing Process, 
held in August 

• Three staff members presented at the Northeast Conference on Social Studies, held this year 
in Boston 

• Seven new staff members were added in 1998 

• More than 270 parent volunteers participated in school activities 

• Hosted Community Read-A-Thon in November 

School District Department Reports 

Pupil Personnel Department 

The Office of Pupil Personnel had responsibility for the design, implementation, and evaluation 
of staff and services in the following areas: 

• Special Needs 

• English as a Second Language (ESL) 

• Health Care Services 

• Related Service Providers such as: Adjustment Counselors, Psychologists, Speech and 
Language Pathologists, Occupational and Physical Therapists, Adaptive P.E. Teachers, 
Vision Therapist, and a Consultant for Hearing Impaired. 

All of the above were part of the complex program/staff required to meet the increasing 
demands of students found eligible for services as set forth in Chapter 766 of the Massachusetts 
State Regulations. There were 705 students receiving special needs services, which represented 
12.4 % of the school population. This was 4.6% below the state average of 17%. 

Youngsters received a wide range of services that ran along a continuum from mildly to 
significantly involved. For example, some required minimal speech and language therapy while 
others required services from special needs teachers and multiple therapists. Every attempt was 
made to provide for and keep students in their home school district, however, the more 
significantly involved student required a type of program not available in the Andover Public 
School system and the 766 TEAM at times decided to place that student in an out-of-system 
facility to maximize the student's educational opportunity. As of January, 1999, 63 students 
attended school out of the district. 

Presenting issues in the field included, but were not limited to the advances in medical 
technology that have made it possible to save many babies who would not have survived a few 
years ago. These "Medically Fragile" children are frequently complex and make up a portion of 
the growing population of children entering our schools today requiring considerable assistance 
from teachers, therapists, and nurses. 

Technology utilization in both the assessment and instructional components of educational plans 
are now mandated by both federal and state laws requiring acquisition of both hard and software 
and teacher training. This is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. 



-81- 



Specific growth in the area of children identified with Autism and/or Pervasive Developmental 
Disorder (PDD), and Aspergers Syndrome also placed demands on staff for training and 
suggested a shift in educational paradigms. 

The number of students K-12 who had experienced significant trauma continued and impacted 
their ability to be successful, further taxing the resource of the adjustment counselors. Some of 
these students required placement out of the district in a therapeutic educational environment 
while others were successful in the newly developed alternative middle and high school 
programs, boasting five graduates this June. 

In summary, 705 out of 5680 (12.4%) students received some form of special education services 
from the Andover Public Schools. Sixty-three of these students were in out-of-system 
placements. The total number of identified students continued to be well below the state average 
of 17%. Andover Public Schools' highly committed staff was largely responsible for keeping 
these numbers at a reasonable level. They strove to provide the best possible educational 
environment for students while recognizing the need to be fiscally responsible. 

Health Education Department 

The Andover Health Education Department provided comprehensive health instruction to the 
students of Andover to increase each students mental, physical, emotional, and social well being. 
Curriculum benchmarks that are concurrent with the State Curriculum Framework Learning 
Standards were taught in Grades K-9, and 11-12 Health Education Programs to promote positive, 
healthy lifestyles. The health program begins at the very earliest age in the building of positive 
self concepts and decision making techniques in The Great Body Shop Program. Secondary 
students are given accurate, clearly defined, and current health knowledge so that they may 
achieve their highest potential for well-being. The program is designed to provide a sequential 
curriculum with varying strategies and materials to enhance the students quality of life. 

The following were key programs or events occurring in 1998: 

The Department of Health Education administered the Center for Disease Control Youth Risk 
Behavior Survey to all middle and high school students with parental permission. Behaviors 
related to tobacco, alcohol and illegal drug use, sexuality, diet, exercise, violence and mental 
health issues were reported. A forum hosted by Andover's Community Health Advisory Team 
in conjunction with C.A.R.E.S. (Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support) 
reported the results of the survey and introduced to the public town agencies and school 
organizations that work with the prevention of and intervention with risky behaviors in the 
community. 

Parent-to-Parent sponsored speakers, workshops, and parenting education classes on a variety of 
health topics. Carol Plotkin and Dr. David Treadway spoke of "Talking with Your Kids About 
Sexuality", Dr. David Sadker and Phyllis Lemer presented "Failing at Fairness" and a number of 
"Effective Parenting" workshops and lectures took place. 

In March, a day long interactive conference for all seventh graders and their parents was held at 
Merrimack College. The conference featured workshops on communication and decision making 
skills which were facilitated by high school peer leaders and professionals from the fields of 
adolescent development. 

In December, the Aids Quilt was brought to Andover High. A section of the quilt which 
represented a variety of youth victims of aids was exhibited in the high school library. A person 

-82- 



living with HIV spoke to the student body and two high school students designed quilt sections 
in memory of loved ones. 

Ninety Andover High School girls participated in the strategies for safe living program "Model 
Mugging". This program teaches solutions for safe living as students are taught practical skills 
to enhance their safety. Sixty Andover High School students attended the Essex County 
Correctional Facility as guests of their "Scared Straight" Program. 

Student Club for West and Doherty Middle Schools participated in a number of health related 
activities. Throughout the year club members raised money for Cancer Awareness Week, 
acquired clothing to donate to Lazarus House, designed health bulletin boards, and raised 
tobacco addiction awareness in cartoons, song, and infomercials. 

Arts Department 
Performing Arts: 

Over 800 students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. Instrumental and vocal students 
continue to participate through the audition process for district and state ensembles with the 
following success: 

Four AHS students All-State 1 vocal, 3 instrumental 

Eleven student Senior District 4 vocal, 7 instrumental 

Seventeen students Junior District 14 vocal, 3 instrumental 

Andover High School Drama Production "The Miracle Worker" was presented to audiences at 
both middle schools in addition to the community. Andover High School '98 musical was 
"Grease" which was performed to sold out houses both evenings. 

Visual Arts: 

Andover High School student art work was submitted to the Boston Globe with the following 
success: 

• 2 Gold Keys 

• 2 Silver Keys 

• 6 Honorable Mentions 

All Andover High School art courses were expanded and revised to fit the Statewide 
Frameworks benchmarks and current curriculum models. All but two courses will be offered as 
full year, 1 credit courses. 

Notable Accomplishments: 

South School Chorus was chosen to perform at the '98 Massachusetts Music Educators All-State 
Conference in Danvers. One Andover High School student was chosen to perform in the 
Massachusetts Music Educators All-Eastern Chorus in New York City. Andover High School 
Marching Band received a Gold Medal at the New England Scholastic Band Association Finals. 
Mallets and Palettes" Fine Arts Festival was a visual and performing arts all day Saturday event 
attended by over fifteen hundred people. Performances and workshops were presented by 
students and teachers at all grade levels. 

Educational Technology Department 

The following was accomplished and in place in fulfillment of the district's long range 
technology plan: 

-83- 



TechWorks technology curriculum support materials acquired and distributed to classrooms. 

TechWorks teacher inservice training conducted for classroom implementation. 

Over 12,000 seat hours of Teacher inservice training in the use and implementation of 

technology in the curriculum was offered in 1998. 

Cable Television (CATV) Institutional system (I-loop) completed. 

Wide Area Computer Network (WAN) installed using CATV I-loop. 

All schools and central administration office connected to WAN. 

Local Area Networks (LAN) setup in all schools. 

NT 4.0 Client servers installed and operational at each school. 

Upgrade of all Windows95 computers to Windows NT Workstation 4.0. 

Implementation of Andover Public Schools Web page - www.andoverpublicschools.com. 

MediaOne Internet Express installed allowing all schools all classrooms access to the 

Internet. 

1050 computers setup for LAN/WAN network services, the Internet, and e-mail. 

Upgrade of all the Media Center's Winnebago Circulation and Catalog to Winnebago 

Spectrum. 

Full operation of Andover High School Television Studio - all periods scheduled for TV 

production classes. 

Installation of CATV system that allows for only selected CATV channels to be cablecast via 

the I-loop to Andover Public Schools classrooms. 

Televisions, VCRs, and Video Storage Cabinets installed in all classrooms that enables 

teachers to: 

Select appropriate educational programming to enhance the curriculum. 

Connect their classroom computer(s) to the television in their classroom to provide large 

group instruction. 

Connect to the CATV system to access the satellite dish educational programming. 

Videotape student's computer generated projects. 

Video tape educational programming for time-shift playback. 

Access to District calendar of events broadcast on the I-loop CATV network. 

Access to District Training Channel cablecast on the I-loop CATV network. 

View in school produced programming. 

Physical Education Department 

Physical Education Department instruction focuses on human development, physical fitness, the 
acquisition of gross and finite motor skills and specific activity skills. Hopefully, students will 
be motivated to plan and pursue an active and healthy lifestyle throughout their lives. It is the 
pursuit of this department to provide students with a foundation of information and knowledge 
that will cultivate and facilitate such a lifestyle. This program is organized and implemented 
through the medium of various physical activities. 

Curriculum/Program 

• The reorganized high school program completed the second year of a new format in which 
students selected their physical education course. This format enabled the department to 
establish class sizes that were appropriate for the specific course. 

• The new fitness room provided the opportunity to deliver a comprehensive fitness and 
wellness course. Approximately thirty percent of the student body was enrolled in the course 
this year. Students had the opportunity to connect the cognitive domain of fitness and 
wellness with practical lab experiences. 

-84- 



• The Project Challenge course continued to be a successful component of the program. Two 
additional stations were added to the outdoor course last spring giving the course a variety of 
high element challenges for the students. 

• The high school physical education standards, benchmarks and assessments were completed 
last spring. 

Noteworthy Recognition's 

• The Physical Education program continued to receive recognition for quality programs. The 
high school staff presented our program at the state conference last spring. 

• Andover high school was selected to host an all day workshop for secondary physical 
education teachers. Approximately seventy teachers representing twenty-three communities 
attended this successful day. The high school staff presented the Personal Fitness course 
during one of the sessions. 

Activities 

• The new high school fitness room was available to all students each day after school until 
4:00 p.m. 

• Intramurals were offered at different times throughout the year at each elementary and 
middle school. 

Facilities 

• The new fitness/wellness room was equipped this past summer with fourteen selectorized 
Nautilus strength training machines and fourteen cardiovascular machines. This room added 
a new dimension to the physical education and interscholastic athletic programs. Students 
and staff were most appreciative of this new facility. 

Athletic Department 

■ Renovations of Lovely field completed including a new six lane all weather track and new 
press boxes. 

• New scoreboard installed at Lovely field which was donated by the Pepsi Cola company of 
Bradford, MA. 

• New fitness room opened in Dunn Gymnasium for fall. Room has twenty-eight new fitness 
machines from the Nautilus company. 

• Girls' basketball team played in the state championship game at the Worcester Centrum. 

• Participation levels were at an all time high with over 1400 roster spots filled. 

• Director of athletics received District "A" Athletic Director of the Year award. 

• Varsity teams recorded an overall record of 233- 1 1 5-5 . Third best in the state. 

• Senior citizens continued to make a valuable contribution by means of the tax voucher 
program. 



-85- 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

The Annual Report for fiscal year 1 998, covering the period from July 1 , 1 997 through June 30, 
1998, was accepted and approved at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District Committee held on October 27, 1 998. The report is prepared 
each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Establish a Regional School District. 
Participating communities in the district are the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North 
Andover and Methuen. 



1995-96 



1996-97 



1997-98 



Enrollment 


1,384 


1,380 


1,351 


Andover students 


12 


12 


16 


Placement of graduates/employment 


80% 


81% 


82% 


Business Firms with 


2,023 


2,075 


2,115 


Coop. Work Agreements 









The following courses were offered during the 1997-98 school year: 



Allied Health Technician 

CAD/Machine/Drafting 

Cosmetology 

Electrical 

Food Tech. Management/Clothing 

Office Technology 



Autobody 

Construction & Building 
Distributive Education 
Electronics 
Industrial Electronics 
Plumbing/HVAC 



Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts 

Graphics 

Metal Fabrication 

Power Mechanics 



1998 HIGHLIGHTS 



Daniel R. O'Connell was hired as new Principal. 

Completion of the Tenney Gate House Restoration Project. 

Building Expansion Project was approved by the State and school's four communities. 

Freshman Academy Program completed its first year with focus on improving Math, Science and 

Communication Skills. 

Super Bowl Champions in football for the first time in the history of the school. 

Football Coach Robert Rosmarino elected Eagle Tribune Man-of-the-Year. 

Marketing plan underway with a new School video and viewbook and the Reggie Video 

Magazine TV show. 

MCAS Remediation Plan created by Curriculum Coordinator. 

Developed a recycling program and completed an energy audit. 

Three-year school year improvement plan was enacted. 

Several community service projects were completed. 

Increased student involvement in the School to Career Program. 

Established a Future Teachers Club of America. 

Autobody became NETEF certified. 

Pre and Post testing of grade 9 students with the IOWA Test of Basic Skills was done. 

New school philosophy, update of various school policies and District Committee mission 

statement were developed in preparation for the NEASC reaccredidation visit. 



-86- 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the presentation of it historic and archeological resources. 



Demolition Delay Bylaw 

The Commission heard demolition requests for three properties. All were approved - two 
with conditions. 

Local Historic Districts 

The Ballard Vale Local Historic District Commission continues its work in hearing proposals 
and advising residents about the design of historically sensitive changes to buildings in the district. 
Dennis Ingram, Chairman, is the Preservation Commission's representative to this Board. 

The Shawsheen Village Historic District Study Committee, Ray Flynn, Chairman, has 
completed its study of the feasibility of creating a local historic district, written a preliminary report 
with defined boundaries for the potential new district and submitted a warrant article for the 1 999 
Annual Town Meeting recommending the enactment of an historic district bylaw. 

Heritage Education 

The Andover Preservation Awards were held in May 28, 1998 at Memorial Hall Library in 
cooperation with the Andover Historical Society to recognize outstanding examples of preservation 
in the community. 

Other Projects of Note 

• Will Hall, Phillips Academy: The APC voted to continue to support the reuse of this former 
dormitory as a Senior Center for the Town 

• 66 Poor Street: Renovation continues on the 1 820 Joseph Poor House with advise from the 
Commission. 

• A joint meeting was held with members of the Ballardvale Historic District Commission, 
Shawsheen Village Historic District Study Committee and Design Advisory Group to discuss 
with Town officials how to improve issues regarding enforcement of the regulations 
administered by these boards. 

• Essex Heritage Commission Signage. Norma Gammon coordinated signage options and 
placement of signs designating four areas of historical importance in Andover. 



■87- 



West Parish Chapel: Jim Batchelder, representative to the West Parish Garden Cemetery 
Committee, reported the scope of fundraising required for the renovation of the chapel, 
approximately $400,000, and its scheduled completion date sometime this winter. The APC 
voted to write letters of support for funding and work with the committee in that effort. 

Central Street National Register Historic District: The Commission expressed concern 
regarding significant development intrusion into this district. 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The purpose of the Commission is to ensure that changes and additions are harmonious to 
the District and to prevent changes that might detract from the aesthetic and historic values of the 
District. 



The Ballard Vale Historic Commission completed its third year conducting twelve regular 
meetings and two public hearings. 

There were ten applications (three commercial/seven residential) submitted to the Commission 
during the year. The applications ranged from new building construction/additions to repair and 
renovation of existing buildings. 

The Commission is staffed by seven residents of the District and an architect who also serves 
on the Andover Preservation Commission. The Commission would like to thank Kevin Byrne, 
whose term expired during the last year, for the many hours of service to the Commission over the 
last several years. In November of this year, Edward Morrissey was appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen to serve as an alternate member on the Commission. 

Looking toward the coming year, the Commission is working with the Andover Preservation 
Commission and the Andover Patriotic Committee to make several improvements to the Ballard Vale 
Commons as well as the development of a street signage program for the District. 



-88- 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. The regular meetings of the 
Board of Commissioners are held on the second Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court 
Community Room. Board Members are as follows: 

Ronald Hajj - Chairperson 

Norma Villarrel - Vice Chairman 

Hartley Burnham - Governor's Appointee 

James Cuticchia - Treasurer 

Jason Fox - Asst. Treasurer 

Christine Metzemaekers - Executive Director 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 2 1 8 units of state-aided elder/disabled housing, 56 
units of state-aided family housing, 7 leased housing units under the Massachusetts Rental Voucher 
Program, 10 units under the state-aided Alternative Housing Voucher Program and 8 units of 
housing under the Chapter 689 program. In addition, the Authority administers 58 Section 8 
Certificates and 68 Section 8 Vouchers which are federally funded through the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development. 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: Income Limits 

1 person $31,700 4 people $45,300 7 people $56,150 

2 people $36,250 5 people $48,900 8 people $59,800 

3 people $40,750 6 people $52,550 

Apartment turnover 1998: 48 Elder/Disabled units 14 Family units 

Average rent: $241 Elder/Disabled Program $334 Family Program 

FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: Section 8 Rent Assistance Income Limits 

1 person $19,850 4 people $28,350 7 people $35,150 

2 people $22,700 5 people $30,600 8 people $37,400 

3 people $25,500 6 people $32,900 

STATE-FUNDED MODERNIZATION WORK : Completed 1998 

• $800,000 Heating and Hot Water Tank replacement - Memorial Circle - 56 units 

STATE-FUNDED MODERNIZATION GRANTS : Applied for and awarded in 1998 
$713 to de-lead Memorial Circle 

• $172,000 to upgrade Fire Alarm System - Grandview Terrace and Frye Circle 

• $100,000 for site work at Grandview Terrace 

$83,000 for slanted roof and gutter replacement at Frye Circle 

FEDERALLY FUNDED GRANTS RECEIVED : 
Section 8 Family Self Sufficiency Program - $45,000 

-89- 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort 
or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-six (20) cases, disbursing 
$26,081.48 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1997 $146,365.60 

Receipts- 1998 27.191.10 

$173,556.70 
Disbursements- 1998 26.081.48 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1998 $147,475.22 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved three applications in the amount of $596.64 during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/97 $38,966.37 

Income -FY-1998 2,096.88 

Expenditures - FY- 1 998 596.64 

Balance as of 6/30/98 $40,466.61 



-90- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1998 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



Money Market Fund 
Securities @ Book 



1/1/98 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



$4, 1 61 .88 -Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 
249,160.23 -Brokerage Fees/Tax 

-Reinvest Mutual Fd. Cap. Gains 
-Transfers from Reserve Fund 



$253,322.11 



Increase 



$6,591.66 



12/31/98 



$441.29 Money Market Fund $7,18199 
(10.00) Securities @ Book 252,731.78 
3,130.26 
3,030.11 



$259,913.77 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 
(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 



$5,654.18 

2,712.98 

181.36 


Dividends Received 
Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
Capital Gain Distributions 
Interest Received-Other 

Income Total 

EXPENSES 


$6,885.18 

5,259.40 

10,103.42 

788.87 


Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 

(7/1/97-6/30/98) 


$5,993.36 

3,517.14 

11,790.02 


$8,548.52 


$21,300.52 


$23,036.87 








$5,813.33 
833.53 
607.90 






Andover High School Projects" 
Misc. Operating Expenses 
Library Plaque of Mr. Punchard 

Expense Total 

Net Income 

TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 




- • - 


$7,254.76 






$15,782.11 

2,304.00 
726.11 






-10% of Income (1/1-12/31/98) 
-Unexpended School Proj. Funds 

Increase 






$12,752.00 





$261 ,870 63 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$281,214.29 



-91- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, I998 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

CASH/MONEY MARKET FUND 

MUTUAL FUNDS 

3,137.710 Shs. Delaware Decater Income Fund, CI B 
4,215.852 Shs. Federated High Income Bond Fund, CI B 
4,367.471 Shs. Franklin Utilities Fund, CI II 
1 ,173.834 Shs. Pioneer Growth Fund, CI. B 
675.204 Shs. Seligman Comm. & Info Fund.CI B 

TOTAL MUTAL FUNDS 



SECURITIES - BONDS/NOTES 

$15,000 U.S.Treasury Note,6.375%,Due 8/15/02 
$10,000 Pepsico Inc. Note,6.250%,Due 9/1/99 
$10,000 IBM Note,7.250%,Due 11/1/02 
$20,000 Wachovia Corp.Note,6.375%,Due 4/15/03 

TOTAL BONDS/NOTES 



BOOK VALUE 



$7,181.99 



MARKET VALUE 



$7,181 99 



TOTAL SECURITIES 



$53,971.65 



$252,731.78 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 
BOOK VALUE 



$0.00 



67,077.00 
50,000.00 
44,954.66 
21,501.78 
15,226.69 


57,137.70 
47,091 .07 
48,347.90 
23,101.05 
19,412.12 


(9,939.30) 

(2,908.93) 

3,39324 

1 ,599.27 

4,185.43 


$198,760.13 

14,412.90 
9,740.00 
9,874.35 

19,944.40 


$195,089.84 

15,820.35 
10,071.10 
10,650.00 
20,642.40 


($3,670.29) 

1,407 45 
331.10 
775.65 
698.00 



$57,183.85 



$252,273.69 



$3,212.20 



($458.09) 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



ANDOVER BANK CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - BankBoston 

TOTAL FUNDS 



$259,913.77 



$259,455.68 



($458.09) 



$5,993.36 
11,790.02 



$17,783.38 

$3,517.14 
$281,214.29 



INCREASE IN MARKET VALUE FROM 1/1/98 



$17,783.38 

$3,517.14 

$280,756.20 

$16,391.86 



$0.00 

$0.00 
($458.09) 



-92- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING: DECEMBER 31 ,1 998 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 










BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/98 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/98 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


$2,452.36 




$222.66 


$2,675.02 


$0.00 


$2.67502 


J.W.BARNARD 


8,343.18 




769.18 


9,112.36 


200.00 


8.912.36 


ALICE M.BELL 


1,272.50 




117.39 


1,389.89 


45.00 


1.344.89 


THOMAS BLACK 


16,782.95 




1 ,348.36 


18,131.31 


1,000.00 


17,131.31 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


2,910.10 




268.45 


3,178.55 


100.00 


3,078.55 


FRED W.DOYLE 


12,561.68 




1,150.50 


13,712.18 


500.00 


13.212.18 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,883.00 




173.54 


2,056.54 


70.00 


1 ,986.54 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


2,598.08 




241.01 


2,839.09 


0.00 


2,839 09 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1 ,282.65 




120.88 


1 ,403.53 


45.00 


1 .358.53 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,429.84 




132.54 


1,562.38 


0.00 


1,562.38 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


3,147.29 




290.74 


3,438.03 


100.00 


3,338.03 


NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 


20,465.16 




1,180.64 


21,645.80 


1,000.00 


20,645.80 


MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 


37,516.55 




3,460.12 


40,976.67 


2,000.00 


38,976.67 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


11,980.88 




1,100.20 


13,081.08 


440.00 


12,641 08 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 


32,248.83 




2,971.36 


35,220.19 


2,000.00 


33,220.19 


HENRY WYATT 


7,541.63 


1,326.73 -A) 


723.69 


9,592.05 


500.00 


9.092.05 


A.F.B. & WA TROW 


85,490.06 




3,996.91 


89,486.97 


4,500.00 


84.98697 




$249,906.74 


$1 ,326.73 


$18,268.17 


$269,501 .64 


$12,500.00 


$257,001 64 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 

DIVIDEND INCOME 

CAPITAL GAIN DISTRIBUTIONS 

GAIN (LOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 

BROKERAGE FEES/TAXES 

NET INCOME 



$6,695.88 

2,391.82 

9,171.32 

14.15 

(5.00) 

$18,268.17 



(A- Addl funds contributed by Town Employees- 7/98 



FUNDS HELD 



ANDOVER BANK CD'S (2) 

SUNAMERICA MONEY MARKET FUND 

1 ,414.534 Shs. DELAWARE DECATUR INCOME FUND 

1 ,251 .043 Shs. FEDERATED HIGH INCOME BOND FUND 

1,067.808 Shs. TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 

SUNAMERICA MONEY MARKET TROW FUND 

1 ,654.533 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND 

1 ,571 .820 Shs. PIONEER CAPITAL GROWTH/TROW FUND 

1 ,796.294 Shs. PIONEER SMALL COMPANY//TROW FUND 

$25,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE,6.25%,4/30/01 

$10,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE ,6. 125%, 7/3 1/00 

$5,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE ,6.375%, 8/1 5/02 

$20,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE,6.25%,2/15/03 

$5,000 IBM NOTE.7.250%,1 1/1/02 

$5,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE,6.250%,9/1/99 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


$28,433.10 


$28,433.10 


10,399.14 


10.39914 


25,758.66 


29.822.20 


13,974.15 


15.000 00 


17,202.39 


20.164 20 


4,289.88 


4 289 88 


48,180.00 


31.593 39 


29,062.95 


29.367 29 


19,040.72 


19.736 41 


25,882.75 


24969 25 


10,218.80 


9990 63 


5,273.45 


4804 30 


21,137.60 


18600 00 


5,325.00 


4 961 85 


5,035.55 


4 870 00 


$269,214.14 


5257 001 64 



=====3== 



-93- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED : DECEMBER 31,1998 

PROCEEDS COST 



GAIN/(LOSS) 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE 
LESS: STOCKS SOLD 



- 1/1/98 



STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 



$165,629.87 



NONE 



0.00 



TOTAL SOLD 
ADD: STOCKS & MUTAL FUNDS ACQUIRED 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



2/26/98 831 .486 Shs. Pioneer Growth Fund, CI B @ 18.04 1 5,000.00 

11/10/98 473.261 Shs. Delaware Decatur Income Fund.CI. B @21.13 10,000.00 

1 1/10/98 259.605 Shs. Pioneer Growth Fund, CI. B @19.36 5,000.00 

1 1/25/98 9.425 Shs. Seligman Comm. Fund.CI. B @ 24.37(Reinvest Cap.Gain) 226.69 

12/03/98 128.605 Shs. Franklin Utilities, CI. II @ 10.90 (Reinvest Cap. Gain) 1 ,401 .79 

12/18/98 82.743 Shs. Pioneer Growth Fund.CI. B @1 8. 15 (Reinvest Cap. Gain) 1,501.78 



TOTAL ACQUIRED 
BOOK VALUE- 12/31/98 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/98 

LESS: BONDS SOLD/MATURED/REDEEMED 

02/17/98 U.S.TreasuryNote-8.125%,2/15/98 
10/15/98 U.S.Treasury Note-7. 125%, 10/1 5/98 



TOTAL MATURED 



BOOK VALUE- 12/31/98" 



TOTAL SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE - 12/31/98 

CECKING ACCT. & CASH RESERVES 
BROKER/ MONEY MARKET FUNDS 

TOTAL BOOK VALUE OF ASSETS - 12/31/98 





33,130.26 






$198,760.13 






BONDS/NOTES 






$83,530.36 




$15,000.00 
15,000.00 


14,680.58 
14,878.13 


$319.42 
121.87 


30,000.00 


29,558.71 


441.29 




$53,971.65 

$252,731.78 

9,510.50 
18,972.01 






$281,214.29 





-94- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
DETAILS OF MISC. OPERATING EXPENSE 



Copying Costs 

Postage 

Office Supplies 
' -Computer paper (1/2) 

- 500 - #10 & 100 - 9 X 12 Envelopes 
-1,000 Labels - 

( "Supported by Punchard Trustees") 

- Printer cartridge (1/2) 

- Return address stamp 

Fidelity Insurance 

Service Charges - Bank Boston 

Treasurer's Honorarium 

TOTAL 



YEAR ENDED 


YEAR ENDED 




12/31/98 


12/31/97 


VARIANCE 


$25.13 


$32.77 


-7.64 


36.76 


60.32 


-23.56 
0.00 


0.00 


20.34 


-20.34 


15.58 


0.00 


15.58 


62.06 


0.00 


62.06 


11.75 


0.00 


11.75 


0.00 


12.85 


-12.85 


80.00 


80.00 


0.00 


102.25 


82.79 


19.46 


— - 500:00 


500.00 


0.00 


$833.53 


$789.07 


$44.46 



-95- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 

TWELVE MONTHS ENDED: December 31,1998 



PROCEEDS 



COST 



GAIN/(LOSS) 



STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/96 
LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS SOLD 
NONE 

TOTAL SOLD 
ADD: STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS ACQUIRED 



1/1 3/96 1 ,251 .043 Shs. Federated High Income Bond Fund, CI. B 

6/30/96 3.528 Shs. Pioneer Equity Income Fund, CI. B /Trow (Reinvest Div.) 

10/22/96 124.349 Shs. Templeton Growth Fund, CI. II (Reinvest Cap. Gain) 

12/23/96 69.236 Shs. Pioneer Small Co. Fund/Trow, CL B (Reinvest Cap. Gain) 

12/24/96 215.357 Shs. Delaware Decatur Inc. Fund, CI B (Reinvest Cap. Gain) 

TOTAL ACQUIRED 

BOOK VALUE -12/31/98 



0.00 



$124,104.55 



0.00 



15,000.00 

99.06 

1,919.94 

696.59 

3,861.35 



21,578.94 



$145,683.49 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/98 : 
LESS: BONDS/NOTES SOLD/MATURED 
3/31/96 U.S. Treasury Note,5. 125%, 3/31/98 



BONDS/NOTES 



$5,000.00 



$73,181.88 



4,985.85 



TOTAL REDEEMED 



BOOK VALUE- 12/31/98 



TOTAL SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE - 1 2/31/96 

BROKER M/M FUND & CHECKING ACCT. 

ANDOVER BANK CD'S (2) 

SUNAMERICA MONEY MKT. FUND/TROW 

TOTAL BOOK VALUE OF ASSETS -12/31/98 



5,000.00 


4,965.85 


14.15 




$68,196.03 






$213,879.52 






10,399.14 

28,433.10 

4,289.88 






$257,001.64 





-96- 



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■97- 



Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balances 

All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

June 30, 1998 















Fiduciary 






Governmental Fund Type 




Proprietary Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Total 






Capital 


Special 


Water 


Sewer 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Projects 


Revenue 


Enterprise 


Enterprise 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 
















Real Estate 


52,476,815.79 












52.476.815.79 


Personal Property 


1,758,838.79 












1.758.838 79 


Tax Title Redemptions 


577,215.36 














Motor Vehicle Excise 


4,005,525.17 












4,005,525.17 


Intergovernmental 


7,836,938.23 












7.836.938.23 


Other Excise 


731 ,506.00 












731,506.00 


Penalties and Interest 


311,999.31 












311,999.31 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


2.016.00 












2.016.00 


Charges for Services - Water 








5,878.181.56 






5,878.181.56 


Charges for Services - Sewer 










2,231,044.56 




2,231,044 56 


Fees 


506,116.32 




204,338.24 








710,454.56 


DMM Facilities Rental 


69,472.14 




10,522.00 








79.994.14 


Departmental Revenue ■ Schools 


69,679.00 


167,071.52 


3,491,711.12 








3.723.461 64 


Departmental Revenue - Libraries 


49,542.00 












49.542.00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 






200,493.90 








200.49390 


Departmental Revenue- Recreation 


382,951.83 




233,859.63 








616.811.46 


Departmental Revenue- Ambulance 


368,660.24 












368.66024 


Other Departmental Revenue 






1,055,370.85 








1.055.370 85 


Licenses and Permits 


797,276.00 












797.276 00 


Special Assessments 


2,607.06 






2,997.47 


1 1 1 ,759.50 




117.364.03 


Fines and Forfeits 


272,344.81 












272.34481 


Investment Income 


853,988.82 






48,363.73 


12,239.61 




914.592.16 


Other 


172,547.35 










2,137,693.34 


2,310.240 69 
00 


Total Revenues 


71,246,040.22 


167,071.52 


5,196,295.74 


5,929,542.76 


2,355,043.67 


2,137,693.34 


86.454.471 89 


Expenditures 
















General Government 


2,529,894.50 




28,585.85 








2.558.480 35 


Community Development 


1,113,862.60 


2,080,387.69 


257,731.27 








3,451.981 56 


Community Service 


1,059,204.52 


102,374.75 


283,796.33 








1,445.375 60 


Municipal Maintenance 


4,076.533.25 


1,194.50 


30,640.22 








4,108.367 97 


Public Safety 


8,998,934.19 


19,317.35 


1,080,762.93 








10.099.014 47 


Water Enteprises 




2,102,555.18 




2,337,166.51 






4,439.721 69 


Sewer Enterpriese 




168,743.08 






1,195,736.56 




1.364.479 64 


Public Works 


4,310,150.02 


715,535.51 


626,783.04 








5,652.468 57 


Library 


2.058,863.66 




22,819.54 








2.081.683 20 


School 


31,110,640.97 


5,478,416.24 


1,968,887.44 








38.557.944 65 


GLRVTHS 


104,544.00 












104,544 00 


Fixed 














00 


Insurance 


415,797.17 












415.797 17 


Debt Service 


6,668,499.72 






2,280,137.39 


520,652.75 




9.469.289 86 


Retirement 


2,783,579.48 












2.783.579 48 


State & County Assessments 


1,015,466.23 












1.015.466 23 


Unclassified 


31,393.86 




27,124.74 






5,298,882.11 


5.357.400 71 

00 


Total Expenditures 


66,277,364.17 


10,668,524.30 


4,327.131.36 


4,617,303.90 


1,716,389.31 


5,298,882.11 


92.905.595 15 


Other Financing Sources (Uses) 














00 


Transfers 


(3,385.086.24) 


1,023,000.00 


(84.079.76) 


(709,660.00) 


(247,525.00) 


3,403,351.00 


(0 00) 


Debt Activity 




7,900,000.00 


(540,000.00) 








7.360,000 00 


Other 


(21,391.23) 




(574.00) 


23,590.52 


(2,213.76) 




(588 47) 
00 


Total Other Financing 














Sources (Uses) 


(3,406,477.47) 


8,923.000.00 


(624.653.76) 


(686,069.48) 


(249,738.76) 


3,403,351.00 


7 359.411 53 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 



1,562.198.58 



(1,578,452.78) 



244,51062 



626.169.38 



388,915.60 



242,162.23 



Fund Balance July 1, 1997 
Fund Balance June 30, 1998 



8,312,976.35 



9,875,174.93 



6,622,744.58 



5,044,291.80 



1,130,610.82 



1,375,121 44 



580.047.90 



122.754.18 



1,206,217.28 



511,669.78 



7,450,271.03 



7,692,433.26 



■98- 



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ARTICLE 

ART 18, 1985 
ART 62, 1993 
ART 26, 1995 
ART 23, 1996 
ART 24, 1996 
ART 47, 1996 
ART 53, 1996 
ART9A, 1996 
ART 24, 1997 
Art 26, 1997 
Art 32, 1997 
Art 35, 1997 
Art 55, 1997 
Art 56, 1997 
Art 31, 1998 
Art 33, 1998 
Art 34, 1998 
Art 36, 1998 
Art 51, 1998 
Art 58, 1998 
Art 59, 1998 
Art 61, 1998 
Art 63, 1998 
Art 69, 1998 
Art 70, 1998 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

JUNE 30, 1998 (REFLECTED TO SHOW DEC 15, 1998 ISSUE) 

PROJECT NAME 



SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

CONSERVATION 

FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION 

WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS 

SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

CONSERVATION FUND 

CONSERVATION LAND ACQ 

SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 

SCHOOL BUILDING PLANS 

REPLACE GUARDRAILS 

SEWER MAYFLOWER 

FIRE TRUCK 

PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 

SEWER PLANS - SOUTH MAIN STREET AREA 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION - BROOK/CHESTNUT ST 

SEWER PLANS - ROGERS BROOK 

TOWN BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS 

SANITARY SEWER - BALMORAL ST 

PEARSON ST ACQUISITION 

HUSSEY BROOK/RIVER ST REPAIRS 

WATER MAIN CONST - BURNHAM ROAD 

FISH BROOK PUMPING STATION 

SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATIONS 

IMPROVEMENTS AHS TRACK/WINDOWS 



AUTHORIZED 


ISSUE 


AUTHORIZED 


AMOUNT 


DATED 




JUNE 30, 1998 


DEC 15, 1998 


JAN 01, 1999 


1,160,000.00 




1,160,000.00 


430,000.00 


430,000.00 


0.00 


384,000.00 




384,000.00 


929,552.00 


929,552.00 


0.00 


250,000.00 


250,000.00 


0.00 


4,000.00 




4,000.00 


1,000,000.00 


1,000,000.00 


0.00 


1,500,000.00 


1,500,000.00 


0.00 


500,000.00 


150,448.00 


349,552.00 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


0.00 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


0.00 


350,000.00 


350,000.00 


0.00 


600,000.00 


600,000.00 


0.00 


150,000.00 


150,000.00 


0.00 


2,000,000.00 


1,300,000.00 


700,000.00 


410,000.00 


410,000.00 


0.00 


500,000.00 


300,000.00 


200,000.00 


652,000.00 


652,000.00 


0.00 


110,000.00 


110,000.00 


0.00 


180,000.00 


180,000.00 


0.00 


100,000.00 


100,000.00 


0.00 


525,000.00 


525,000.00 


0.00 


375,000.00 


375,000.00 


0.00 


750,000.00 


750,000.00 


0.00 


768,000.00 


768,000.00 


0.00 


14.027,552.00 


11.230.000.00 


2,797.552.00 



■112- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1998 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Finance Committee: 



Transfers by Vote of Town Meeting, 
April , 1997 



Finance Committee - Other Expenses 
Central Purchasing - Other Expenses 
Town Clerk - Other Expenses 
Employee Benefits 
Police • Other Expenses 
Fire • Personal Services 
Debt Service 



5,455.00 
37,070.00 

6,586.00 
17,500.00 

7,700.00 
92,000.00 
33,689.00 



From Taxation 



200,000.00 



Transferred to Surplus 



0.00 
200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 

General Government 
Public Safety 



115,265.98 
45,168.90 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting, 
April , 1997 

From Taxation 
From Carryover 



50,000.00 
116,664.93 



160,434.88 



Balance to Surplus 



6,230.05 
166,664.93 



166,664.93 



■113- 



BENEFICIARY 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1998 

BALANCE 
JULY 1,1997 DEPOSITS 



BALANCE 
JUNE 30, 1996 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 
CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS 



178,987.84 
(178,987.84) 



1,520.00 
(1,520.00) 



2.181.77 
(2,161.77) 



182,689.81 
(182.689 61) 



0.00 
000 



M.V. LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 
CHRIST CHURCH 
WEST PARISH 
ST. AUGUSTINES 



CEMETERY FUNDS 
SPRING GROVE 



UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 





87,264.03 


100,000.00 


8,368.59 




8,071.13 




464.34 


2310.00 


2,450.00 




140.98 


650.00 


689.39 




39.66 



EMILINE LINCOLN 
EMMA J. LINCOLN 
CONSERVATION FUND 



A.V.I.S 
A.V.I.S 
CONSERVATION 



J. GREELEY I 

STABILIZATION 1 

INSURANCE 1 

BXBC WORKING CAPITAL DEPOSIT 
TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 



1,133.32 

617.20 

37,525.00 



368,416.00 
(368.416.00) 
2,417,595.61 



67.40 

36.71 

2.227.33 



4.648,608.43 



99,615.00 

461.13 

140.00 

39.39 



584.32 



(10,244.00) 
(368,416.00) 
4,500,600.97 



96.037.62 

8.074.34 

2.450.98 

68966 



98.494.55 


100.000.00 


9.013.57 


100.255.52 


107.252 60 


56,334.73 
693,065.07 


36,000.00 


33.358.77 




56334.73 
762.423.84 


749.399.80 


36.000.00 


33.358.77 


0.00 


818.758.57 


278.618.61 




15,279.54 


32,000.00 


261,898.15 


278.618.61 


0.00 


15,279.54 


32.000.00 


261.898.15 



1.200.72 

653.91 

39,168.01 



39.275.52 


0.00 


2.331.44 


584.32 


41.022.64 


5,186.30 




302.12 


186.30 


5,302.12 


5.186.30 


0.00 


302.12 


186.30 


5,302.12 


1,468,244.23 


60,000.00 


90,604.80 




1.618,849.03 


1.468.244.23 


60.000.00 


90.604.80 


0.00 


1.616.849.03 


218,795.92 


96,432.50 


11,823.15 


92,317.00 


234,734.57 


218.795.92 


96.432.50 


11.823.15 


92.317.00 


234.734.57 



378.660.00 

0.00 

2,623.652.39 



2.417.595.61 



4.648.808.43 



57.849.32 



4.121.940.97 



3.002.312.39 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 






FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1,143.46 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


911.96 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


218.94 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1058.93 


9.813.28 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1000.00 


7,620.98 


A. & A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1000.00 


5,118.74 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




24,110.11 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






1,349.45 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


291.71 


991.16 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


730.88 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


3787.68 


3,743.70 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1000.00 


8,898.18 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




160,459.71 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




5,098.06 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5000.00 


38,966.37 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345825.50 


345,825.50 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10000.00 


30,573.18 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7845.81 


31,892.47 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5000.00 


15.111.42 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1302.77 


1.699.61 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


1,176.62 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




781,192.45 


CD&P-ROGERS BROOK 






4,095.13 


TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 






0.00 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




14,885.22 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5766.63 


10,303.43 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


81.95 


448.16 



WORKERS COMP TRUST 
1998 CONTRIBUTION 
ADJUSTMENT OF 1997 SCHEDULE A 
1997 CONTRIBUTION 
1996 CONTRIBUTION 
1995 CONTRIBUTION 



GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS ADJUSTMENT 



MV LIBRARY CONSORTIUM (TRUST AND AGENCY) 

TRUST AND AGENCY 

TRAMSFER TO TRUST AND AGENCY 

A/P DUE GF RE: CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 



DUE TO GENERAL FUND 



1.506.976.67 



32.000.00 
146.500.00 
146,500.00 



377.30 
144.00 

250.00 



68.02 
54.24 
13.01 
583.68 
317.94 
304.45 
1.322 JO 

82.78 
58.96 
43.47 
222.35 
529.25 
23.675.47 
130.81 
2.096.88 

1,818.45 
1,945.63 
775.92 
97.88 
69.98 
46,464.56 
59.75 
170.94 
407.02 
578.98 
26.66 



81.919.26 



247.00 

31.069.29 

596.64 



38.533.09 



1.211.48 

966.20 

231.95 

10.396.96 

3,967.92 

5.423.19 

25.809.61 

598.50 

1,576.23 

1,050.12 

774.35 

3.969.05 

9.427.43 

153.065.89 

5.228.87 

40.466.61 

345.825.50 

32.391.63 

33.838.10 

15,887.34 

1.703.33 

1.246.60 

827.657 01 

4.154.88 

5.185.92 

12.737.24 

10.882.39 

474.62 



1.556.149.12 



73.792.00 
(114.500.00) 
146.500.00 
146.500.00 



137,157.00 






129,081.00 


8.076.00 


462,157.00 


0.00 


73.792.00 


275.581.00 


260.368.00 




7.244.744.21 


4.947.027.21 


376.273.97 


4.661.398.20 


7906.647.19 








178,987.84 


(178,987.84) 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


178.987.84 


(178.987.84) 


(87.284.03) 
(11,210.52) 


(100,000.00) 
(644.98) 


(8.368.59) 
640.52 


(99,615.00) 


196,037.62) 
(11.21498) 


(98.494.55) 


1100.644.98) 


17.728.07) 


199.615.001 


11 O7.252.60l 








70,000.00 


(70.000.00) 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


70.000.00 


(70.000 00) 


82,105.37 


325,111.75 




265.263.80 


141.953.32 


82.105.37 


325.111.75 


0.00 


265.263.80 


141.953.32 



7.228,355.03 5,171,493.98 

-114- 



368.545.90 



5,076,034.84 



7.692,360.07 



400A 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - AI'KII, 27. 28, 29, 1998 



WARRANT 




ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


1. 


Town Election 


2. 


Elect Other Offices 


3. 


Salaries of Elected Officials 


5. 


Town Budget Transfers 


6. 


Supplemental Budget Approp. 


7. 


Grant Program Authorization 


8. 


Road Contracts 


9. 


Free Cash 


10. 


Unexpended Appropriations 


11. 


Chapter 90 Road Easements 


12. 


Unpaid Bills 


13. 


Town Report 


14. 


Property Tax Exemptions 


15. 


Rescind Bond Authorizations 


16. 


Community Services Rev. Acct. 


17. 


Comm. Development Rev. Acct. 


18. 


Municipal Maint. Rev. Account 


19. 


Elder Services Revolving Acct. 


20. 


Contracts in Excess of Three Years 


21. 


Accepting Easements 


22. 


Granting Easements 


23. 


Tax Voucher Program 


24. 


Recreation Land Fund 


25. 


Regional Library Appropriation 


26. 


Sr. Center Lease/Williams Hall 


27. 


Fire Dept. Insurance Reimburse. 


28. 


Town Office Building Purchase 


29. 


Middle School Architect Service 


30. 


Sewer/Forest Hills Drive Area 


31. 


Eng. Designs/Sewer/So. Main 


32. 


Sewer So. Main/Ballardvale 


33. 


Sewer Construction/Relief Sewer 


34. 


Plans/Sewer/Rogers Brook 


35. 


Sewer/Riverina Rd. 



ACTION 

TAKEN 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Approved 

Disapproved 



ATT. GEN- 
APPROVAL 



■115- 



400B 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - AI'UII. 27, 28, 20. 1998 



WARRANT 




ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


36. 


Town Building Improvements 


37. 


Retirement Bd. Compensation 


38. 


Conserv. Agreement Voc. Tech. 


39. 


Official Warrant 


40. 


Moderator 2/3 Vote 


41. 


Yard Sales 


42. 


Nonconfotmance/Zoning 


43. 


Retail Property Overlay Dist. 


44. 


Earth Removal 


45. 


Earth Removal 


46. 


Open Space Residential Dcvel. 


47. 


Wireless Communications Facil. 


48. 


Wetland Protection Bylaw 


49. 


Conservation Revolving Acct. 


50. 


Outside Consults./Conservation 


51. 


Sanitary Sewer/Balmoral St. 


52. 


Sewer Service Agreement 


53. 


Salaries of Elected Officials 


54. 


Record Selectmen Meeting 


55. 


Record Finance Committee 


56. 


COLA/Municipal Retirees 


57. 


Accum. Employee Benefit Acct. 


58. 


Pearson Street Acquisition 


59. 


Hussey Brook/River St. Repairs 


60. 


Land Acquisition/Parking Lot 


61. 


Water Main Const. Burnham Rd. 


62. 


Numbering Warrant 


63. 


Fish Brook Pumping Station II 


64. 


Sidewalk Restoration Program 


65. 


Town Projects 


66. 


Public Safety Building Plans 


67. 


West Knoll Road 


68. 


West Knoll Road Right of Way 


69. 


School Building Renovations 



ACTION 
TAKEN 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Disapproved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



ATT. GEN- 
APPROVAL 



August 31, 1998 



August 31, 1998 



August 31, 1998 



August 31, 1998 
w/exceptions 



■116- 



400C 



ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - AI'UH, 27, 28. 29, 1998 



WARRANT 




ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


70. 


AHS Track, Windows, Shades 


71. 


Licenses and Permits 


72. 


Trans/SalesATax Delinquent 


73. 


Subdivision/Tax Delinquent 


74. 


Amend Tax Delinquent Bylaw 


75. 


Amend Ballardvalc Hist. Dist. 


76. 


Andover Link to the Future 


77. 


Appropriation/Future Corp. 


78. 


Main St. Park Garage Plan 


79. 


Main St. Parking Lot 


80. 


Main St. Park Garage 


81. 


Smoke Bomb/Silly String BL 


82. 


Fireworks 


83. 


Sidewalk/Chestnut St. 


84. 


Sewer Ext./Rock O'Dundee 


85. 


Ballardvalc Green Irrigtn. 


86. 


Sister-City Associations 


87. 


Williams St. Easement 


88. 


Rezone/Parcels of Land 


89. 


Accept Land/Haverhill St. 


90. 


2 nd Hand Dealer/Pawnbroker 


91. 


Noel Road 


92. 


Paddock Lane 


93. 


Warwick Circle 


94. 


West Hollow 


95. 


David Drive 


96. 


Deca Circle 


97. 


Basswood Lane 


98. 


Hazelwood Circle 


99. 


Buttonwood Drive 


100. 


Acorn Drive 


101. 


Radcliffe Drive 


102. 


Yardley Road 


103. 


Devonshire Place 


104. 


Lenox Circle (P) 



ACTION 


ATT. GEN. 


TAKEN 


APPROVAL 


Approved 




Approved 


August 31, I99S 


Disapproved 




Disapproved 




Disapproved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Disapproved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Approved 


August 31, 1998 


Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 


August 31, 1998 


Approved 




Approved 


August 31, 1998 


Withdrawn 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Approved 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Withdrawn 




Approved 




Approved 




-117- 





400 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 24, 1998 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION TOTAL: 3212 
The total number of ballots cast was 3212, viz: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 5 



2232 
2633 



Precinct 2 
Precinct 6 



2484 
2509 



Precinct 3 
Precinct 7 



2251 
2298 



Precinct 4 
Precinct 8 



2472 
2499 



Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



MODERATOR (1) 

James D Doherty 
John Doyle 
All Others 
Blanks 

SELECTMAN (2) 

John P. Hess 
Lon A. Becker 
Ruben Nieves 
All Others 
Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) 

Tina Girdwood 
Joan N. Cohen 
Richard J. Collins 
All Others 
Blanks 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (1) 

Norma Villarreal 
Calvin A. Deyermond 
Denise A. Fraize 
All Others 
Blanks 



329 
71 
2 
46 



313 

208 

204 

2 

169 



299 
221 
239 

1 
136 



176 
146 
78 

48 



284 
87 
1 
21 



263 
227 
159 
2 
135 



193 
172 

285 



136 



146 
156 
53 
1 
37 



264 
68 
4 
26 



242 
193 
161 

1 
127 



211 
169 
235 

109 



146 
146 
40 

30 



315 
72 
1 
30 



289 
213 

204 



130 



242 

217 
260 

1 
116 



180 
132 
60 
2 
44 



TRUSTEE PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL (1) FOR ONE YEAR TO FILL A VACANCY 
Eric Stubenhaus 324 294 269 302 

All Others 12 3 2 

Blanks 123 97 90 114 



283 

106 

4 

28 



270 

234 

197 

2 

139 



191 
249 
256 
2 
144 



201 
113 
64 
1 
42 



278 

4 

139 



285 
83 
1 
24 



268 
209 
193 

116 



200 
218 
251 


117 



226 
97 
33 
1 
36 



294 

99 



264 
66 
2 
28 



252 
179 
169 


120 



208 
217 
198 

97 



215 
84 
37 

24 



273 
1 
86 



313 


2337 


84 


637 





15 


20 


223 


295 


2192 


197 


1660 


216 


1503 


2 


9 


124 


1060 


230 


1774 


241 


1704 


240 


1964 


2 


6 


121 


976 


210 


1500 


128 


1002 


46 


411 





5 


33 


294 


323 


2357 


2 


15 


92 


840 



TOTAL: 



3212 



118- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 1998 401 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 2, 1 998 the Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, arc to vote at 
the Dunn Gymnasium, Andovcr High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 1998 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have 
notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house 
and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen 
days. 

Ronald F. Ford 

Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at 
eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue 
of Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 27, 1 998, at 7:00 P.M., at the 
Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andovcr. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 27. 1998 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 980 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:07 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by The Reverend Dr. Calvin Mutti, South Church Congregational, 
Central Street, Andover, MA. 

Salute to the flag was led by William T. Downs, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

The song, America, written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1 83 1 while attending Andover Theological 
Seminary, was sung by Jennifer Powers, a student at Andover High School. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit seven (7) non-voters to the meeting and allow 
non-voters to be escorted to the non-voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39 Sec. 15 as amended by the Acts of 1996 
to allow the moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. The motion carried by a majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 



■119- 



402 ANNUA!, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 

School Committee Chairman Eric Nadworny, recognised David Bimbach for Ins contribution to 
the School Committee for the recent term of three years he just completed on the Board. This was 
Mr. Bimbach's second non-consecutive term as a school committee member. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two members of 
the School Committee for three years, one Trustee of Punchard Free School for two years to fill a 
vacancy and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years. 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 24, 1 998: 

The polls were open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P. M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

John P. Hess Selectman for Three Years 

Lori A. Becker Selectman for Three Years 

Tina Girdwood School Committee for Three Years 

Richard J. Collins School Committee for Three Years 

Norma L Villarreal Andover Housing Authority 

Eric Stubenhaus Trustee of Punchard Free School for Two Years to fill a 

vacancy 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that John H. Caswell, 13 Rcnnic Drive, be 
elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers for Fiscal Year 1999 be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $ 1 25.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and S30.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - S 1 ,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members- $1,200.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise 
and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of 
the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year 
beginning July 1, 1998, and ending June 30, 1999. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to raise and appropriate the following sums 
of money: 



-120- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 403 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

PERSONAL SERVICES Including S 1 73,250 in Community 

Services receipts, $149,225 in Elder 
Services receipts, $57,500 in Federal grants 
and $20,000 in State Grants for Elder Services 
and $13,000 in Wetland filing fees from 
Community Development $3,040, 1 29.00 

OTHER EXPENSES Including $226,750 in Community 

Services Receipts 1,463,488.00 

Total Appropriated 4,503,617.00 



A motion was made and seconded to divide the General Government portion of the budget into four 
(4) motions to be acted on separately. The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: Yes: 291 No: 244 

Motion I 

Moved General Government in the amount of $2.285,983: 

Personal Services $ 1 ,42 1 ,266.00 

Other Expenses 864.717.00 

Total $2,285,983.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Motion II 

Moved Community Development in the amount of $1.087.210: 

Personal Services $ 923,020.00 

Other Expenses 164.190.00 

Total $1,087,210.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Motion III 

Moved Community Services in the Amount of $603.056: 

Personal Services $ 328,051.00 

Other Expenses 275.005.00 

Total $ 603,056.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Motion IV 

Moved Elder Services in the Amount of $527.368: 

Personal Services $ 367,792.00 

Other Expenses 159.576.00 

Total $ 527,368.00 
Including the following receipts: 

-121- 



404 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including 5173,250 in Community 
Services receipts, $149,225 in Elder 
Services receipts, $57,500 in Federal grants 
and $20,000 in State Grants for Elder Services 
and 513,000 in Wetland filing fees from 
Community Development 

Including $226,750 in Community 
Services Receipts 



The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Total Appropriated 

PLANT AND FACILITIES 

Including $60,000 from rental 
income and $70,000 from 
Cemetery interest income and 
540,000 from sale of lots 



Total Appropriated 
The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 



4,503,617.00 



2,160,698.00 
2,484,260.00 
4,644,958.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $384,000 from 
ambulance receipts, $33,677 from 
parking meter receipts and 513,000 from 
State grants 



8,258,954.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $21,280 

from parking meter receipts 



Total Appropriated 
The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 



565,253.00 
8,824,207.00 



PUBLIC WORKS 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 

Total Appropriated 
The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 



2,440,516.00 
6,517,275.00 
8,957,791.00 



-122- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 405 

LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,381,146.00 

10 OTHER EXPENSES Including 548,000 from State 

Library Aid 5S8,404.00 

Total Appropriated 1,969,550.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

UNCLASSIFIED 

1 1 COMPENSATION FUND 576,500.00 

12 RESERVE FUND 200,000.00 

Total Appropriated 776,500.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $40,000 from Health 

Insurance Trust Fund 27,427,862.00 

14 OTHER EXPENSES Including $50,000 in Medicaid receipts 6,109,290.00 

Total Appropriated 33,537,152.00 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

15 Total Appropriated 117,332.00 

FIXED 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 3,345,229.00 

17 BOND REDEMPTION 6,277,700.00 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 60,000.00 

1 9 INSURANCE EXPENSES 5 1 6,400.00 

20 RETIREMENT 3,076,772.00 

21 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 3,325,000.00 

Total Appropriated 16,601,101.00 



■123- 



406 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

An amendment was made and seconded to reduce the budget by 1% excluding fixed costs. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 4 in the amount of 
$79,932,208.00 by a Majority vote. 



TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION 



$79,932,208.00 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 



Article 6 



Article 9 
Article 12 
Article 23 
Article 25 
Article 57 
Article 65 



Article 82 
Article 83 

Article 84 
Article 85 
Article 95 



Supplemental Budget Appropriation FY 1998 $ 141,000 

Public Safety - Personal Services $5 1 ,000 
School Department - Other Expenses $90,000 



Free Cash For FY 99 Budget 

Unpaid Bills 

Tax Voucher Program 

Regional Library Appropriation 

Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 

Town Projects 

Storm Drainage Improvements - $300,000 
Land Fill Closure -$125,000 
Aerial Mapping - $250,000 
Traffic Lights/Lovejoy & Dascomb - $12,000 
Various Capital Improvement Projects - $100, 
Pomps Pond Improvements - $30,000 
Engineering Plans for Ballficlds - $138,000 
Skateboard Park - $45,000 

Fireworks 

Engineering and Plans for sidewalk 
on Chestnut Street 

Sewer Extension - Rock O'Dundee 

Ballardvale Green Irrigation 

David Drive Acquisition 



300,000 

33,448.86 

36,000 

95,486 

400,000 

1,000,000 



000 



7,500 
10,000 

40,000 

5,000 

60,000 



TOTAL 



$2,128,434.86 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 



Article 5 Transfer from: 

Public Works - Special Services 
Library - Personal Services 
Insurance - Other Expenses 
Debt Service - Interest Expense 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Plant and Facilities - Personal Services 
Public Safety - Personal Services 



$ 80,000 

7,000 

100,000 

140,000 



$ 65,000 
262,000 



-124- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 407 

Article 23 Transfer from: 

Article 30 - 1995 Annual Town Meeting S 9,500 

Article 61 - 1996 Annual Town Meeting 4,500 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Article 23 - Tax Voucher Program S 14,000 

Article 27 Transfer from: 

Insurance Recoveries in excess of $20,000 Account $96,432.50 

and be appropriated to the following: 

Insurance Trust Account $96,432.50 

TOTAL $437,432.50 
RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 

Engineering Designs/Plans for Sewer on So. Main Street $2,000,000 

Relief Sewer Construction/Brook Street 4 1 0,000 

Sewer Plans/Rogers Brook Area 500,000 

Town Building Improvements 652,000 

Sanitary Sewer - Balmoral Street 1 1 0,000 

Pearson Street Acquisition 1 80,000 

Hussey Brook/River Street Repairs 1 00,000 

Water Main Construction - Burnham Road 525,000 

Fish Brook Pumping Station Phase II 375,000 

School Building Renovations 750,000 

Andover High School Improvements - Track, Windows, 768,000 
Shades and Furnishings 

TOTAL $ 6,370,000 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53ft REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 

Department of Community Services $ 200,000 

Community Development & Planning 40,000 

Plant and Facilities 30,000 

Elder Services 150.000 

TOTAL $ 420,000 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 64 Sidewalk Restoration $400,000 



Article 


31 


Article 


33 


Article 


34 


Article 


36 


Article 


51 


Article 


58 


Article 


59 


Article 


61 


Article 


63 


Article 


69 


Article 


70 



Article 


16 


Article 


17 


Article 


18 


Article 


19 



-125- 



408 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 

Article 28 Town/School Office Building purchase 51,800,000 

A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the 
April 14, 1997 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 33B. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer the 
sum of $327,000 from the following accounts: 

Public Works - Personal Services $80,000 

Library - Personal Services $ 7,000 

Insurance - Other Expenses $ 1 00,000 

Debt Service - Interest Expense $140,000 

and appropriate to the following accounts: 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services $ 65,000 
Public Safety - Personal Services $262,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 14; 1997 Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vole that the Town transfer 
from Free Cash the sum of $141,000 and appropriate to the following accounts: 

Public Safety - Personal Services $5 1,000 

School Department - Other Expenses $90,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any 
funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under 
any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 7 as printed in the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



■126- 



ANNUA!, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 409 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract 
with the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or 
either of them for the construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for 
the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 8 as printed in the Warrant 
by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 1999 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1 998 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as printed in the Warrant 
in the amount of $300,000 by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 10. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 1 1 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay 
unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 1 2 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $33,448.86 from Free Cash for the following bills: 

$ 4,425.00 Wood Hill Contractors for snow plowing 

$ 123.86 Lahey Clinic Medical Bills 

$25,500.00 Ropes & Gray Bond Counsel Services 

$ 3,400.00 Ropes & Gray Bond Counsel Services 

VOTE: YES: 701 NO: 2 A 4/5 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 13 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

-127- 



410 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 1998 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the 
Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 1999 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 14 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior 
Town Meetings or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving 
account for ticket sales, related trip expenses, new special events and youth activities for Fiscal Year 
1999; such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from these activities, and to authorize the 
Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $250,000 for FY- 1 999, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 16 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote not to exceed $200,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Community Development and 
Planning revolving account for expenses charged for advertising or legal hearings and/or legal 
notices associated with permit applications and for expenses charged for health clinics and Title V 
upgrade permits and applications for the Building, Health, Conservation and Planning divisions of 
said department for Fiscal Year 1999; such expenses to be funded by fees collected from applicants 
and clinic participants, and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount not 
to exceed $40,000 for Fiscal Year 1999 or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 17 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote not to exceed $40,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Department of Plant and Facilities 
revolving account for field maintenance and related expenses for Fiscal Year 1999, such expenses 
to be funded by revenues collected by field rentals, and to authorize the Town Manager to make 
expenditures in an amount not to exceed $30,000 for FY- 1999, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 18 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote not to exceed $30,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 411 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E'/i for the purpose of establishing an Elder Services revolving account 
for expenses related to Senior activities and programs of said department for Fiscal Year 1 999; such 
expenses to be funded by fees collected from participants, and to authorize the Town Manager to 
make expenditures in an amount not to exceed SI 50,000 for Fiscal Year 1999 or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 19 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vole not to exceed S 1 50,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager, in his capacity as chief procurement officer, to 
solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, extension or 
option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of the Town 
by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 20 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes 
on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 21 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water drainage, sewage disposal and utility purposes on terms and 
conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 22 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
the sum of $50,000 for the purpose of providing senior citizens and disabled homeowners with a real 
estate tax payment voucher program pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by the Council on 
Aging and approved by the Town Manager or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 23 be approved 

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412 ANNUM. TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 

as printed in the Warrant in the amount of S50,000 by transfer of S9,500 from Article 30, 1995 
Annual Town Meeting, $4,500 from Article 61, 1996 Annual Town Meeting, andS36,000 from free 
cash. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of S 1 ,000,000 for the 
acquisition of land for active and passive recreation purposes, or lake any oilier action related 
thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$ 1 ,000,000 for the acquisition of land for recreational purposes and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7(3) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 24 was DEFEATED by majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 220 NO: 550 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to that the Town Meeting give a vote of 
confidence for the Town to move forward with plans for active recreation. The Moderator saw no 
opposition. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Conservation Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of $95,486 and 
appropriate to the Memorial Hall Library budget, said sum representing additional State Aid for 
support of regional library services or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 25 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $95,486 from Free Cash and appropriate to Memorial Hall 
Library - Other Expenses. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
lease of the building and land at Williams Hall at Phillips Academy for use as a Senior Center on 
terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to be in the best interests of the Town and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to petition the General Court for special 
legislation for such a lease or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27. 1998 413 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of 596,432.50 from the insurance 
Recoveries In Excess of 520,000 Account to the Insurance Trust Account, said sum representing 
insurance proceeds for damage to the Town's ambulance or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 27 be approved 
as printed in the Warrant in the amount of 596,432.50. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to exercise its option to purchase the Buildings (known 
as Town and School Administration Offices, 36 Bartlct Street) from the Lessor, Andovcr Office 
Associates Limited Partnership, upon the expiration of the initial term on July 15, 1999 for the 
agreed amount of 51,800,000 and that to meet this obligation shall appropriate 51,800,000 from the 
Stabilization Fund for this purpose or take any other action related thereto. 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 28 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the Amount of 51,800,000 from the Stabilization Fund. 

VOTE: YES: 786 NO: 2 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 52,350,000 for 
architectural and engineering services and related costs for constructing, furnishing and equipping 
a Middle School including outside work and other costs incidental and related thereto; for 
engineering and design services to prepare plans for the construction of sidewalks in the area of the 
proposed Middle School; for engineering, design, and appraisal services to prepare plans for the 
construction of a sanitary sewer line from the end of the existing sewer along the Merrimack River 
near Hewlett Packard to the proposed Middle School site at Cross Street at High Plain Road via 
River Road and Cross Street or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 5220,000 for 
engineering, design, and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of a sanitary sewer 
line in the following streets: Launching Road, portion from River Road to house #15; Mercury 
Circle, Apollo Circle; Gemini Circle; Forest Hill Drive; Aspen Circle; Bittersweet Lane; 
Wintergreen Circle; Deerbury Circle; Brierwood Circle; Sandalwood Lane, Pepperidge Circle; 
Alpine Drive; Sugarbush Lane; Brady Loop and Monahan Lane or take any other action related 
thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of 52,000,000 for the 
cost of engineering and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of sanitary sewer 
lines in the Ballardvale Road area and South Main Street area as shown on the 1979 Wastewater 
Facilities Plan including adjacent streets in the Fosters Pond and Wobum Street area or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
52,000,000 for engineering and design services to prepare plans and specifications for the 

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414 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 1998 

construction of sanitary sewer lines in the Ballardvale Road area and the South Main Street area as 
shown on the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan, including adjacent streets in the Fosters Road and 
Woburn Street areas, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that 
to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(22) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 31 so that the debt service 
resulting from this article be funded through general taxation and not through the sewer rates. 

The amendment LOST by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED. 

VOTE: YES: 634 NO: 142 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of SI, 600,000 for the 
cost of engineering and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of sanitary sewer 
lines in the Ballardvale Road area and the South Main Street area as shown on the 1 979 Wastewater 
Facilities Plan or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark E. O'Malley and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of S4 1 0,000 for the cost 
of constructing a relief sewer in Brook Street from Essex Street to Central Street and in Chestnut 
Street between Bartlet Street and Whittier Street or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$410,000 for constructing a relief sewer in Brook Street from Essex Street to Central Street and in 
Chestnut Street between Bartlet Street and Whittier Street, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7(1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY THE MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of S500,000 for the cost 
of engineering and appraisal services to prepare plans for the construction of sanitary sewer lines in 
the Rogers Brook Area as shown on the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of Katherine Scapicchio, Carter Rountree and others 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 415 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
5500,000 for engineering and design services to prepare plans and specifications for the construction 
of sanitary sewer lines in the Rogers Brook area as shown on the 1979 Wastewater Facilities Plan, 
and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(22) of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of 59,450,000 for the 
rehabilitation of the oldest section of the original sections of the original sewerage system, such 
rehabilitation consisting of the replacement of the original trunk sewer from Riverina Road to 
Central Street and the initial replacement program for sewers in the Rogers Brook area. 

On petition of J. Gregory Luckman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$9,450,000 for the rehabilitation of the oldest section of the original sections of the original sewer 
system, such rehabilitation consisting of the replacement of the original trunk sewer from Riverina 
Road to Central Street and the initial replacement program for sewers in the Rogers Brook area, and 
for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 35 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: DECLARED LESS THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:18 P.M., until Tuesday, April 
28, 1998 at 7:00 P. M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawshccn Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 698 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:05 P.M. 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39, Sec. 1 5, as amended by the Acts of 1 996 
to allow the Moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. The motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit thirteen (13 ) non- voters to the meeting and to escort 
non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$ 1 ,500,000 for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public 
buildings, including necessary site improvements or take any other action related thereto. 



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416 ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
S652,000 for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public 
buildings, including the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3A) of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY THE MODERATOR A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 20(6) of M.G.L. 
Chapter 32 relative to compensation of Retirement Board members or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Article 37 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
Conservation Commission to enter into an Agreement or Agreements and to rati fy any Agreements 
entered into with the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School District and 
Phillips Academy, including a Management Agreement with an initial duration often years with 
provision for automatic renewal or renegotiation by the Parties, upon terms and conditions the Board 
and Commission deem to be in the best interest of the Town, and to grant and accept easements in 
real estate and to convey and accept conveyances of real estate lying between River Road and the 
Merrimack River as shown on plans entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts" dated April 
14, 1995 by Dana F. Perkins, Inc. And "Subdivision and Easement Plan of Land in Andover, 
Massachusetts" dated April 17, 1995 by DanaF. Perkins, Inc. on file with the Town Clerk's Office 
and to authorize such grants, conveyances and acceptances and to authorize the Town Manager and 
Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation for such Agreements, real 
estate grants, conveyances and acceptances or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to approve Article 38 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded a motion was made to amend Article 38 by inserting the 
following sentence at the end of Article 38: 

provided that before the execution of an agreement or agreements or petitioning the General 

Court for legislation, the "management agreement" will be ratified by vote of a regular or special 
town meeting. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to require that, henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide 
each voter of the Town of Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or special 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 417 

Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of such Town Meeting, and stating the 
time and place of holding the meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10; such document to be devoid of editorial 
comment, recommendations and statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 39 was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II of the General By-laws by adding 
the following by-law: 

"On matters requiring a two-thirds vote by statute, a count need not be taken unless the vote 
so declared is immediately questioned by seven or more voters as provided in General Laws Chapter 
39, section 15." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 40 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote with the following amendment be added to the end of the first sentence: 

"Before considering another warrant article the Moderator shall ask if the two-thirds vote is 
questioned." 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 
the following to Article XII, Miscellaneous By-laws, Paragraph 39: 

"Yard Sale shall mean the temporary use of residential, industrial or institutional premises 
for the sale of personal property by the owner or occupant with permission from the owner. 

Personal property shall be limited to property owned and used previously by the owner or 
occupant. 

No yard sale shall be held in any zoning district without the owner or occupant first obtaining 
apermit from the Office of the Inspectorof Buildings. Unless specific written authorization is given 
by the Board of Selectmen, no such yard sale shall be held on any property more than twice in each 
calendar year nor more than once in any period of three (3) consecutive months. No such yard sale 
shall continue for more than two (2) consecutive days. 

If several property owners in the same neighborhood or zoning districts wish to jointly hold 
a yard sale, such sale shall occur on the premises of one property owner only. Property offered for 
sale at such yard sale shall be personal property of said property owners or occupants only. No more 
than two (2) such yard sales shall be held in any calendar year, nor shall more than one such sale be 
held in any period of three (3) consecutive months. 

These regulations shall also apply to all non-profit and charitable organizations. 

Any violation of this bylaw shall be punishable by a fine not to exceed three hundred dollars 
(S300.00). Each day that such violation continues shall constitute a separate violation." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

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418 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section VII of the Zoning By- 
law by deleting the first sentence in the first paragraph and substituting the following: 

"A single-family or two-family dwelling which is nonconforming because of setback, yard, 
area and/or frontage requirements of this by-law may be altered, reconstructed, extended or 
structurally changed as of right through the issuance of a building permit and without a special 
permit or finding by the Board of Appeals as required in subsection VILA below provided that such 
alteration, reconstruction, extension or structural change complies with all current setback, yard, 
building height, building story requirements, and other requirements of this by-law. Such alteration, 
reconstruction, extension or structural change shall not be considered an increase in the 
nonconforming nature of the dwelling." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 42 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by adding to Section 
III.A.4. as follows: 

"Retail Priority Overlay District", 

and, to see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by adding a new Section IV. C. as 
follows: 

(1) "IV.C. Overlay District Use Regulations: 

1 . Flood Hazard Overlay District: For rules and provisions regulating and limiting the 
use of land and construction of buildings in Flood Hazard Districts, see Section VI. I 
of this by-law. 

2. Retail Priority Overlay District: 

a. Purpose: The purpose of the Retail I riority Overlay District is: 1 ) to reinforce 
the retail base of Andover's Central Business District; 2) to encourage the 
location of shopping opportunities in proximity to Main Street; and 3) to 
provide opportunities for retail services and associated uses to locate near one 
another for the convenience of the public. 

b. Uses Allowed by Right: Only the following uses shall be permitted by right 
at the first floor street level within the Retail Priority Overlay District: 

(1) establishment for retail sale of merchandise; 

(2) establishment for personal or consumer service, but excluding 
financial institutions, financial services, stock brokers, insurance 
offices, real estate offices, accounting offices and law offices; 

(3) restaurant where the principle activity is the service or sale of food or 
drink for consumption on or off the premises; 

(4) advertising signs or devices subject to the requirements of Section 
VLB. of this by-law. 

3. Watershed Priority Overlay District: For rules and provisions regulating and limiting 
the use of land and construction of buildings in the Watershed Protection Overlay 
District, see Section VI.P. of this bylaw." 

(2) That each of the following areas of the Town of Andover lying within the General Business 
District be and hereby is established as a Retail Priority Overlay District, namely those areas 
specifically identified on Assessor's Map 38 as lots numbered 1 1 7 and 1 1 8; and on Assessor's Map 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 419 

39 as lots numbered 3, 4, 5, 5A, 6, 7, 19, 20, 2 1, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 3 1 . 33, 35, 36, 37, 
38, 40, 41, 42, 43, and 54; and on Assessor's Map 55 as lots numbered 91, 92, 93, 98, 99, 100, 101 . 
102, 125, 128, 129, and 130; and as shown on a map entitled "Town of Andover Retail Priority 
Overlay District", dated January 22, 1 998, prepared by the Department of Community Development 
and Planning, said plan being on file in the Office of the Town Clerk, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law as follows: 

(1) Delete Section 11.20. (Removal) in its entirety and replace with the following: 

"20. EARTH MOVEMENT — The importing, exporting and/or regrading of soil, loam, peat, gravel, 
rock, or similar material by means of vehicles and machinery, to, from, or on land in Andover." 

(2) Delete Section VI. E. (Removal of material) in its entirety and replace with the following: 

"E. Earth Movement. The importing, exporting and/or regrading of earth materials as defined in 
Section 11.20. of the By-Law: 

1. Except on land in public use, no person shall conduct or cause to be made any earth 

movement activities for purposes not in conformity with the intent and purpose of this by-law. Earth 
movement activities as described above and defined shall be in accordance with one (1) of the 
following procedures: 

1 . 1 Regrading, importing or exporting of earth materials incidental to subdivision development 
in single residence zones: 

a. A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for any earth movement 
undertaken in connection with the construction of streets in a subdivision and, 
whenever and wherever possible, cuts and fills associated with the construction of 
such streets shall be balanced to minimize movement of materials on or off the right- 
of-way. 

b. A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for earth movement 
associated with the preparation of lots in a subdivision. Under such a permit, 
regrading shall be in conformity with the slope requirements set forth in Section 
V.B.12. of this By-Law. Changes in the final elevations from those shown on the 
Definitive Plan shall be limited to less than one ( 1 ) foot. 

c. Applications for special permits for earth movement shall, at a minimum, indicate 
the quantity and composition of materials to be regraded. imported, or exported, the 
estimated number of truckloads involved, the purpose for u hich the materials are to 
be moved, and the location of the site on which the earth movement will be 
conducted. All calculations pertaining to the quantity of earth materials involved 
shall be prepared and certified by a Registered Professional Engineer. Before 
granting any special permit under Section VI. E. I. la., b. or c. the Planning Board 
must find that the subdivision plan as a whole makes the best feasible use of existing 
topography and in making such find the Board shall take into account the magnitude 
of the change in topography resulting from the subdivision plan, the extent of cuts 
and fills, the amounts of earth materials involved, the removal of existing vegetation, 
the preservation and protection of significant natural topographic features such as 
eskers, streams, mature vegetation, and rock outcrops, and the type and size of the 
subdivision plan, whether it be conventional or cluster. The Board shall consider the 
effects on adjacent properties and streets resulting from the earth movement 
activities, and may impose and set forth in the permit such restrictions and conditions 
as deemed reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited to the 
following: 

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420 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

1 . The duration of time during which the special permit may be exercised; 

2. The extent, depth and contours of the land; 

3. The grades of slopes; 

4. The proximity to any public way; 

5. The hours during the day during which the activities may be conducted; 

6. The hours of the day during which vehicles may be loaded or unloaded, and 
the times during which such vehicles may enter or leave the property; 

7. The use of covers over earth materials in vehicles involved in transporting 
earth materials. 

8. The cleaning of street surfaces during and following the transport of earth 
materials. 

Earth movement associated with the preparation of a specific building lot may take 
place only after the issuance of a building permit by the Building Inspector and such 
earth moving activities shall be subject to the provisions of all applicable special 
permits issued by the Planning Board. Earth movement solely associated with the 
required standards for construction or installation of a sewage disposal system is 
allowed subject to a report from the Board of Health certifying that the volumes of 
such earth materials are required for such system, and that such materials are solely 
associated with the required standards for construction or installation of the system, 
said report to be submitted to the Planning Board as part of the application for a 
special permit. 

1.2 Regrading, importing, or exporting, of earth materials incidental to construction or 
improvements on individual lots in single residence zones: Regrading or importing of less than three 
hundred (300) cubic yards or exporting of less than fifty (50) cubic yards of earth materials during 
any three (3) year period is permitted. Where volumes in excess of these limits is desired, application 
must be made to the Inspector of Buildings for an earth moving permit. All regrading shall be in 
conformity with the slope requirements set forth in Section V.B.I 2. of this By-law and shall be 
limited to less than eight hundred (800) cubic yards on lot areas less than one (1) acre and eight 
hundred (800) cubic yards per acre of lot area on lots greater than one (1) acre. Importing or 
exporting shall be limited to five hundred (500) cubic yards per acre of lot area up to a maximum 
of two thousand (2,000) cubic yards for any single lot. The application shall contain the information 
required under Section 1.1c. above. All calculations pertaining to the quantity of earth materials 
involved shall be prepared and certified by a Registered Professional Engineer. The Inspector of 
Buildings may impose and set forth in the permit such restrictions and conditions as deemed 
reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited to the conditions set forth in Section 
VI. E. 1 . lc. 1 . through 8. above. Regrading, importing, or exporting of earth materials in excess of the 
limits specified in this paragraph shall be permitted only if specifically required by the Board of 
Health for the construction of sewage disposal systems, and a report from the Board of Health 
certifying same shall be submitted to the Inspector of Buildings. 

1 .3 Earth movement incidental to construction or improvements in apartment, business, or 
industrial zones: Regrading, importing, or exporting of earth materials incidental to construction or 
improvements in apartment, business, or industrial zones shall be subject to the provisions of 
Sections VI. O. and Q. of the By-law which require site reviews by the Planning Board. 

1 .4 Miscellaneous earth movement: A special permit from the Board of Appeals shall be required 
for earth movement not covered under the provisions of Section VI. E. 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 above. 
Regrading or importing of less than three hundred (300) cubic yards or exporting of less than fifty 
(50) cubic yards of earth materials during any three (3) year period is allowed without special 
permit." 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

(3) Dclclc Section IV.B.34A. in the Table of Uses in its entirety. 



421 



(4) Delete Sections IV.B.34B., 34C, 34D., and 34E. in their entirety and replace with the 
following: 

or take any other action related thereto 























— —, 1 




SRA 


Residence 
SRB 1 SRCI APTI LS - 


Bun 
OP 


GB 1 ,\ru 1 IC 


IA 


ID 


34A. Earth Movement incidental 
to the consnuction of subdivision 
streets subject to the provisions 
of Section VLE.l. la. • 


PB 


P3 


PB 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


34B. Earth Movement incidental 
to preparation of lots in a 
subdivision subject to the provisions 
of Section VLE.l.lb. 


>B" 






N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


P9 


PB 


• 34C. Earth Movement incidental 
to construction on individual lots 
subject to the provisions of 
Section VIE. 1.2 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 

t 


34D. Earth Movement in business, 
apartment or industrial districts - 
subject to the provisions of 
Section VLE.U 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y~ 


" Y 


Y 


Y~1 


Y 


34E. Miscellaneous Earth Movement 
subject to the provisions of 
Section VIE. 1.4 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


[-BA- 


BA 


BA 


BA 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 44 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section VI, Subsection E of the 
Andovcr Zoning By-laws as follows: 

Delete heading : 

"E. Removal of material:" 

Replace bv : 

E. Earth movement: the importing, exporting and/or regrading of earth materials. 

Delete paragraph : 

"I. No person shall remove any soil except from land in public use for purposes not in 
conformity with the intent and purpose of this bylaw. The removal or regrading of earth 
material shall be in accordance with one (1) of the following procedures:" 

Replace bv: 

1 . The purpose and intent of this subsection shall be to: (I) protect the natural features of land 
such as the topography, drainage patterns, streams, mature vegetation, archeology and vistas 
from the damaging effects of large scale earth moving, (li) minimize the undesirable side 
effects of earth moving such as noise, dust, vibration, safely and traffic on public roads and 
(iii) encourage innovative site planning, architectural design and landscaping to make the 
best possible use of existing topography. Except on land in public use, no person shall 
conduct or cause to be made any earth movement activities for purposes not in conformity 
with this purpose and intent. Earth movement activities shall be in accordance with one ( 1 ) 
of the following procedures: 



Delete heading : 

"1.1 General permit:" 



■li9- 



422 ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

Replace by : 

1 . 1 General permit for sand and gravel pits: 

In Section El.l delete all references to : 
"Board of Selectmen" or "Selectmen" 
Replace by : 
Planning Board 

Delete heading : 

"1 .2 Removal or rcgrading incidental to subdivision development or construction:" 

Replace by : 

1 .2 Rcgrading, importing, or exporting of earth materials incidental to subdivision development 
in single residence zones: 

Delete paragraph : 

"a. The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the removal of earth materials in 
connection with the preparation of a subdivision, provided that such materials arc removed 
solely from the road and from such side slopes and off-road casements as arc necessary in 
the opinion of the Planning Board." 

Replace by : 

a. A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for any earth movement 
undertaken in connection with the construction of streets in a subdivision and, whenever and 
wherever possible, cuts and fills associated with the construction of such streets shall be 
balanced to minimize movement of materials on or off the right-of-way. 

Delete paragraph : 

"b. The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the regrading of earth materials in 
connection with the preparation of a subdivision. Any such special permit shall permit 
changes in the approved final elevations as a result of regrading of less than three hundred 
(300) cubic yards of earth material on any lot." 

Replace by : 

b. A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for earth movement associated 
with the preparation of lots in a subdivision. Under such a permit, rcgrading shall be limited 
to less than one thousand (1000) cubic yards on any one lot and all rcgrading shall be in 
conformity with the slope requirements set forth in Section V.B. 1 2 of this By-law. Changes 
in the final elevations from those shown on the Definitive Plan shall be limited to less than 
one(l) foot. 

Delete paragraph : 

"c. The Planning Board may approve a special permit for removal or regrading only if it 
determines that the subdivision plan, as a whole, makes the best feasible use of existing 
topography. In granting any special permit under Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1 .2a 
or b above, the Planning Board shall impose and set forth in the permit such other restrictions 
and conditions as it deems reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited to 
the conditions set forth in Section V, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.1c above." 

Replace bv : 

c. A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for earth movement involving 
the importing of more than three hundred (300) cubic yards or exporting of more than fifty 
(50) cubic yards of earth materials in connection with the preparation of lots in a subdivision. 
Under such a permit, importing or exporting shall be limited to eight hundred (800) cubic 
yards of material on any lot with a maximum of eight thousand (8000) cubic yards for any 
subdivision. 

Delete paragraph : 

"d. Where earth materials arc to be removed in connection with the preparation of a specific site 
for building, removal may take place only after the issuance of a building permit by the 
Building Inspector. Removal will normally be only from areas of the building, the 
driveways, the parking areas and from areas where removal is specifically required by the 
Board of Health in connection with the disposal system. Rcgrading which is necessary and 
incidental to the construction of a building, driveway, parking area or sewage disposal 

-140- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 423 

system is permitted. Additional removal is subject to the provisions of Section VI, 
Subsection E, Paragraph 1.3 below; additional regrading is subject to the provisions of 
Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.4 below." 

Replace by : 

d. Applications for special permits for earth movement shall, at a minimum, indicate the 

quantity and composition of material to be moved, the estimated number of truck loads 
required, the purpose for which the materials are to be moved, and the location of the site on 
which the earth movement will be done. All calculations pertaining to the quantity of earth 
materials involved shall be prepared and certificated by a Registered Professional Engineer. 
Before granting any special permit under Section VI. E. 1.2a, b, or c above, the Planning 
Board shall require that the subdivision plan as a whole makes the best feasible use of 
existing topography and in making such a finding the Board shall take into account the extent 
of the cuts and fills, the amount of earth materials involved, the preservation and protection 
of significant natural topographic features such as cskcrs, streams, mature vegetation, and 
rock outcrops, and the type and size of the subdivision plan, whether it be conventional or 
cluster, and may impose and set forth in the permit such restrictions and conditions as 
deemed reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited to the conditions set 
forth in Section VI. E. 1. 1c above. Where earth materials arc to be moved in connection with 
the preparation of a specific building lot, regrading, importing, or exporting may lake place 
only after the issuance of a building permit by the Building Inspector and such earth moving 
activities shall be subject to the provisions of all applicable special permits issued by the 
Planning Board. Earth movement in excess of the limits specified in Section VI. E. 1 .2b and 
c above shall be permitted only if specifically required by the Board of Health for the 
construction of sewage disposal systems and a report from the Board of Health certifying the 
same shall be submitted to the Planning Board and/or the Building Inspector. 

Delete paragraph : 

"1.3 Miscellaneous removal of soil incidental to improvements: Removal of miscellaneous 
amounts of soil not covered under the provisions of Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.1 
or 1.2 above is permitted, provided that the removal is concomitant with the improvement 
of the property from which the removal takes place and provided that the removal is in 
accord with the expressed intent and purpose of the provisions of this bylaw. Removal of 
aggregate quantities of less than fifty (50) cubic yards from any one ( 1 ) general site requires 
no formal permit. Where removal of soil in quantities in excess of fifty (50) cubic yards but 
less than five hundred (500) cubic yards is desired, application must be made to the Building 
Inspector for a miscellaneous soil removal permit. If appropriate, the Building Inspector 
with the concurrence of the Town Engineer, may issue the permit. The permit i f issued, shall 
indicate the approximate quantity of soil to be removed, the purpose of removal and the 
location of the site of removal. The permit shall also specify that upon completion of 
excavation, exposed subsoil shall be graded and covered with loam to a minimum depth of 
six (6) inches and that failure to do so shall be deemed a violation of the bylaw. Where 
special circumstances exist which indicate the removal of soil in excess of five hundred (500) 
cubic yards but for which a general permit under Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraph 1.1, 
above, is not appropriate, a permit for a larger amount, up to two thousand (2000) cubic 
yards, may be issued, provided that it additionally has the approval and bears the signature 
of the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen or his designated representative. Except where 
the removal under the Section VI, Subsection E, Paragraphl.3, is done in connection with 
the formation or enlargement of a pond, excavation shall not be permitted below the mean 
grade of the street or road serving the property. Where the excavation is in the immediate 
vicinity of the street and in any case shall not be such as to change the direction of flow of 
a watercourse or to cause surface water to gather as in a sump or swale. Pits for burying 
large rocks, stumps or other large objects shall immediately be back filled for safety 
reasons." 

Replace bv : 

1.3 Regrading, importing, or exporting, of earth materials incident to construction or 
improvements on individual lots in single residence zones: 

Regrading or importing of less than three hundred (300) cubic yards or exporting of 
less than fifty (50) cubic yards of earth materials on any lot during any three (3) year 
period is permitted. Where volumes in excess of these limits is desired, application 

-141- 



424 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING -APRIL 28. 1998 



must be made to the Building Inspector for an earth moving permit. All rcgradmg 
shall be in conformity with the slope requirements set forth in Section V.B. 1 2 of this 
By-law and shall be limited to less than one thousand (1000) cubic yards on lot areas 
less than one ( 1 ) acre and one thousand ( 1 000) cubic yards per acre of lot area on lots 
greater than one (1) acre. Importing or exporting shall be limited to eight hundred 
(S00) cubic yards per acre of lot area up to a maximum of eight thousand (S.OOO) 
cubic yards for any single lot. The application shall contain the information required 
under Section 1 .2d above. All calculations pertaining to the quantity of earth 
materials involved shall be prepared and certified by a Registered Professional 
Engineer. Before granting a permit the Building Inspector shall require thai the 
proposed plan makes the best feasible use of existing topography and shall impose 
and set forth in the permit such other restrictions and conditions as deemed 
reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited to the conditions set 
forth in Section VI. E. 1.1c above. Earth movement in excess of the limits specified 
in this paragraph shall be permitted only if specifically required by the Board of 
Health for the construction of sewage disposal systems and a report from the Board 
of Health certifying the same shall be submitted to the Planning Board and/or the 
Building Inspector. 

Delete paragraph : 

"1.4 Miscellaneous regrading: The Board of Selectmen may grant a special permit for the 
regrading of earth material not covered under the provisions of Section VI, Subsection E, 
Paragraph 1.2 above. A special permit shall not be required for regrading of less than three 
hundred (300) cubic yards on any lot." 

Replace bv : 

1.4 Regrading, importing, or exporting of earth materials incidental to construction or 
improvements in apartment, business, or industrial zones: 

Regrading, importing, or exporting of earth materials incidental to construction or 
improvements in apartment, business, or industrial zones shall be subject to the 
provisions of Section VI. O. and Q. of this By-law which require site reviews by the 
Planning Board. 

Add paragraph : 

1 .5 Miscellaneous earth movement 

A special permit from the Planning Board shall be required for earth movement not 
covered under the provisions of Section VI.E. 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 above. Regrading or 
importing of less than three hundred (300) cubic yards or exporting of less than fifty 
(50) cubic yards of earth materials on any lot during any three (3) year period is 
allowed without a special permit. 



34A. General removal of earth materials subject 
lo the provisions of § VI.E.1 .1 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BS 


BS 


34B. Removal of regrading incidental to 
subdivision development subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E.1.2.(a),(b),( c) 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


34C. Removal or regrading incidental to 
construction subject to the provisions of 
§ VI.E.1 .2.(d) 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


34D.Miscellaneoous removal of earth materials 
incidental lo improvements subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E. 1.3 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


34E. Miscellaneous regrading subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E. 1.4 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 



-142- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 



425 



replaced by: 



34A. General exporting of earth materials 
subject to the provisions of § VI.E.1 .1 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N I 


PB 


PB 


34B. Moving of earth materials incidental to 
subdivision development subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E.1. 2.(a),(b).( c) 


PB 


PB 


PB 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


34C. Moving of earth materials incidental to 
construction on subdivision lots subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E.1. 2. (d) 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


34D. Moving of earth materials incidental to 
construction or improvements on individual lots 
subject to the provisions of § VI.E.1 .3 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


34E. Moving of earth materials in apartment, 
business, or industrial zones subject to the 
provisions of § VI.E.1. 4 


N 


N 


N 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


34F Miscellaneous moving of earth materials 
subject to tne orovisions of § VI.E.1. 5 


PB 


PB 


P3I P3 


PB 


PB 


P5 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 



On petition of James C. Keck and others 



WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law as follows: 

(l) Delete Section VI. D. (Cluster development) in its entirety and replace with the following: 

"VI.D. Open Space Residential Development: 

1. Purpose: The purpose of this section is to encourage the preservation of open land for its 
scenic beauty and to enhance open space and recreational use; to protect the natural 
environment; to protect the value of real property; to promote more sensitive siting of 
buildings and better overall site planning; to preserve the natural landscape and environment 
of the Town; to provide critical connections to protected open space areas and 
neighborhoods; to facilitate the construction and maintenance of streets, utilities and public 
services in a more economic and efficient manner; and to promote alternative modes of 
transportation and create a greater sense of community. 

2. Applicability: The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the construction and 
occupancy of an open space residential development on a tract of land in the Single 
Residence B, Single Residence C and Limited Service District subject to the provisions of 
this Section of the bylaw. 

3. Design Requirements: 

a. Lot size: No lot within an open space residential development shall be less than 2/3 of 
the required lot size for the zoning district in which the development is located. 

b. Density: The total number of lots allowed shall be equivalent to the number of lots into 
which the parcel could be divided under normally applicable zoning and subdivision 
regulations. 

c. Lot frontage: The minimum frontage of any lot shall not be less than one hundred ( 1 00) 
feet measured at the street line. Only lots fronting on a subdivision street in an open 
space residential development may have reduced lot area or frontage as allowed in this 
section. 

d. Lot width: No lot may be less than one hundred (100) feet in width between side lot 
lines as measured along lines which are at ninety (90) degree angles to the side 
lot lines. 

c. Open space: A minimum of 30% of the land area within the open space residential 

-143- 



426 ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

development shall be common open space as defined in subsection VI. D. 5 below. 

f. Yard depth: In consideration of a special permit for an open space residential 
development under Section VI. D. 2. of this bylaw, the Planning Board may approve a 
reduction in the minimum side yard depth to 20 feet. 

g. Documentation: All lots to be developed under the provisions of this section shall be 
shown on a recorded plan stating that this section applies. A notation shall be placed on 
the plan indicating that no additional building lots arc to be created through future land 
division of such developed lots. 

4. Application requirements: 

a. At the time of submission of a preliminary or definitive open space residential 
subdivision plan the applicant shall submit a sketch plan of a conventional subdivision 
layout (non-open space residential development) at a scale of one inch equals 40 feet or 
one inch equals 100 feet. The sketch plan shall at a minimum contain the information 
required for a preliminary subdivision plan. * 

b. The plans shall be accompanied by a written statement of the reason or reasons why the 
Board should give favorable attention to an application for an open space residential 
development. 

5. Open space: 

a. All land not designated for roads, lots for dwellings or other development within the 
development shall be held for common open space. Common open space shall be 
preserved for recreation or conservation use and shall comprise not less than 30% of 
the land within the open space residential development. Such open land shall cither be 
conveyed to the Town of Andover and accepted by it for recreation or open space use or 
be conveyed to a nonprofit organization, the principal purpose of which is the 
conservation of open space, or be conveyed to a corporation or trust owned or to be 
owned by the owners of lots or residential units within the plan, articles of corporation 
or trust to be legally drawn up and available for review by Planning Board prior to final 
approval of the plan. If such a corporation or trust is utilized, ownership thereof shall 
pass with conveyances of the lots or residential units. In any case where such land is not 
conveyed to the town, a restriction enforceable by the Town of Andover shall be 
recorded providing that such land shall be kept in an open or natural state and not be built 
upon or developed for accessory uses such as parking or roadway. All such open space 
shall be restricted by deed from all future building. 

b. The Board may require the provision or reservation of pedestrian/bicycle access ways of 
suitable width and in locations suitable for pedestrian/bicycle movement of different 
types connecting open space areas within the open space residential development or to 
other adjacent open spaces and neighborhoods. 

c. Before final approval of the special permit by the Planning Board, the developer shall 
state which of the three conveyance options in subsection a above is being proposed, and 
such disposition, if approved by the Board, shall be recorded as a restriction on the 
development plan. 

d. Prior to issuance of a Clearance Certificate for the development of any lot shown on an 
open space residential development plan the required open space area shall be conveyed 
to the approved recipient, however, prior to such conveyance all taxes for the open space 
area shall have been paid through the full tax-year ofsuch conveyance, and all property 
bounds for the open space area shall have been installed. 

e. Areas deemed by the Board to be inappropriate for the uses of recreation, protection of 
significant natural features or buffering due to size, shape or location, may not be 
included in the minimum required open space area. 

-144- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 427 



6. Decision: The Planning Board may approve a special permit for an open space residential 
development in accordance with the provisions of Section VIII. C. of the Zoning By-Law, 
and upon a finding that such open space residential development fulfills the objectives set 
forth in subsection 1. of this by-law. In its consideration of a special permit for an open space 
residential development plan the Board shall give particular attention to, and may use as a 
basis for its decision, the following criteria: 

a. The arrangement of lots, streets and buildings as they may promote the harmonious 
integration of the proposed development with existing surrounding properties; 

b. Originality in the overall layout and design to achieve the best possible relationship 
between the proposed development and the land; 

c. Usability of open spaces for active or passive recreation, determined by size, 
shape, topography, location, and proximity to nearby recreation or conservation 
areas; 

d. Inclusion within open spaces of irreplaceable natural features such as streams, 
mature trees or clusters of trees, rock outcrops, eskers, bluffs, slopes and historic or 
archaeological features; 

e. Accessibility of open spaces to the handicapped, elderly and children; 

f. Suitability of open spaces for scenic values and improvement or preservation of 
views." 

(2) Amend Section V., first paragraph by replacing the words "Cluster development" with the 
words "Open space residential development". 

(3) Amend Section V.A. by deleting the last sentence after **** and replacing with the following: 

"The minimum yard depth requirement for an open space residential development under Section 
VI.D.3.e of this bylaw may be reduced by the Planning Board to 20 feet." 

(4) Amend Section IV. B. 1 A. by replacing the words "Cluster development" with the words "'Open 
space residential development". 

(5) Amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section VIII.C.2.a.(2) by replacing the words "Cluster 
development" with the words "Open space residential development". 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded i* was moved that Article 46 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 46 by adding to the end of the 
last sentence in paragraph two (2) " subject to the provisions of this Section of the bylaw" the 
following words: "and provided also that the dwellings in such open space development will be 
connected to an existing sewer line." 

The amendment LOST by a Majority vote. 

Article 46 was DEFEATED by majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 190 NO: 277 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



-145- 



428 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI. N. of Zoning By-Law as follows: 

(1) Delete Section 11.25. (Communication Structure) in its entirety and replace with the following: 

"25. Wireless Communications Facilities: Facilities used for the principle purpose of commercial 
or public wireless communications uses, such as cellular telephone services, enhanced specialized 
mobile radio services, microwave communications, personal wireless communications services, 
paging services and the like, as defined in Section 704 of the Federal Telecommunications Act of 
1 996, as amended. Such facilities shall include towers, antennae, antennae support structures, panels, 
dishes and accessory structures." 

(2) Delete Section VI. N. in its entirety and replace with the following: 

"N. Wireless Communications Facility or other similar communications use: The Board of 
Appeals may issue a special permit for a wireless communications facility or other similar 
communications use as defined in Section 11.25. of the Zoning By-Law in districts where allowed 
by Section IV.B.50; excluding any office, storage, or repair use unless otherwise allowed by the 
regulations of the district. For purposes of this by-law, wireless communications facilities do not 
include the following accessory uses or structures: antennae or dishes used solely for residential 
household television and radio reception; antennae or dishes used for commercial or public purposes 
which are not visible from any neighboring property or public way, or dishes used for those purposes 
measuring 39 inches or smaller in diameter; nor amateur radio facilities actively used in accordance 
with the terms of any amateur radio service license issued by the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC), provided that the tower is not used or licensed for any commercial use. Amateur 
radio facilities shall be subject to the requirements of Section VI.N.10. of this by-law. All other 
wireless communications facilities or other similar communications uses shall be subject to the 
following standards and conditions: 

1 . Setback and Height: Towers, antenna, antenna support structures and other vertical elements of 
wireless communications facilities located in a residential district or upon a property abutting a 
residential use shall be set back from the nearest residential lot line a distance at least equal to 
one and one-half times their height. In all districts, the height of wireless communications towers 
shall not exceed 125 feet above the ground. In all districts the height of a ground-mounted dish 
antenna shall not exceed 18 feet measured from the mean finished grade of the base. In non- 
residential districts, the Permit Granting Authority may allow a lesser setback or greater height if 
such modification provides adequate safety, promotes co-location or improves design, and will not 
significantly impact the character and appearance of the neighborhood. In making a request for a 
lesser setback, the manufacturer or qualified licensed designer shall certify that the tower is designed 
to collapse upon itself in the event of failure. The Permit Granting Authority may also allow lesser 
setbacks necessary to allow for the use of an existing structure. 

2. Design provisions for such facilities shall include, but are not limited to: 

a. No new wireless communication facility tower shall be used which involves a lattice 
construction, requires three (3) or more legs and/or requires guy wire supports. 

b. No tower or other facility shall contain any signs or other devices for the purpose of 
advertisement. 

c. The visible portions of support facilities and structures such as vaults, equipment buildings 
or enclosures and utilities shall be constructed out of and/or furnished with non-rcflcctive 
materials. 

d. All towers, antenna, antenna support structures and similar facilities shall be of neutral colors 
that are harmonious with, and blend with, the natural features, buildings and structures in the 
surroundings; provided, however, that such facilities located on the exterior of a building 
shall be of colors that match and/or blend with those of the building. 

e. All building-mounted facilities shall be designed and located so as to appear to be an integral 
part of the existing architecture of the building. 

-146- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 429 

f. All electronic and other related equipment and appurtenances necessary for the operation of 
any wireless communication facility shall, whenever possible, be located within a lawfully 
pre-existing structure or completely below grade. When a new structure is required to house 
such equipment, the siting, design and materials of said structure shall be harmonious with, 
and blend with, the natural features, buildings and structures in the surroundings. 

g. All satellite dishes shall be of mesh construction, unless technical evidence is submitted 
demonstrating that this requirement is infeasible. Microwave dishes are exempted from this 
provision. 

h. All wireless communications facilities shall be protected against unauthorized climbing or 
other access by the public. 

i. Whenever feasible, design and siting of towers shall avoid the need for application of Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) lighting and painting requirements. Except as required by 
the FAA, towers shall not be artificially lighted. 

j. The application shall include eight (8) view lines shown in a one (1) mile radius from the 
site, beginning at true north and continuing clock-wise at forty-five degree intervals. Said 
view lines shall, to the extent feasible, be taken from existing vantage points commonly used 
by the public, such as public ways, buildings or facilities. The submittal shall include 
unaltered photographs taken from eye level (5 feet above grade) which show the existing 
condition of these view lines, as well as accurate scale perspective elevation drawings, 
computer-altered photographs or other accurate representations showing said view lines with 
the facility in place. 

k. A landscape plan shall be submitted with the application identifying all existing vegetation 
and indicating which vegetation is to be retained on the site, and showing all proposed new 
vegetation and other landscape treatments. 

1. The application shall include a site plan prepared by a registered land surveyor or registered 
professional engineer showing the dimensions of the lot or site; the location of the proposed 
facility with distances to property lines; existing and/or proposed buildings on or adjacent 
to the lot or site; existing utility lines, and such other information as the Board may require 
to properly review the application. 

3. Co-Location: 

a. All new wireless communication facilities shall be co-located, to the maximum extent 
practicable and technologically feasible, with one or more existing wireless communications 
facilities, towers, buildings or other structures whose height, locations and characteristics 
meet the needs of the proposed facility. 

b. All new wireless communication towers or support structures shall be designed, to the 
maximum extent practicable and technologically feasible, for co-location of antennas and 
other necessary facilities for at least three other wireless communications providers, shall 
offer space to all other providers at market rates, and shall provide for towers that can be 
extended upward. Any Special Permit granted for a new facility under this section may be 
conditioned upon the written agreement of the facility operator to allow the co-location of 
other wireless communication providers on commercially reasonable terms. 

c. Any applicant proposing not to co-locate their facility or proposing to locate their facility in 
a residential district shall provide written evidence and documentation demonstrating why 
it is not feasible for their facility to be co-located with existing facilities or sited in other, 
non-residential districts. 

4. Frequencies: All telecommunications facilities shall be operated only at Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) designated frequencies, power levels and standards, including FCC Radio 
Frequency Emissions standards. The applicant shall provided certification demonstrating that the 
maximum allowable frequencies, power levels and standards will not be exceeded. Certifications 

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430 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

shall include technical specifications, a written explanation of those specifications, and, if necessary, 
field verification. The Permit Granting Authority may condition any Special Permit granted under 
this section upon a periodic submittal of certification of compliance with said standards. 

5. Repair and Upkeep: All wireless communications facilities shall be maintained in good order and 
repair. Paint finishes shall be maintained and repaired when blemishes arc visible from the property 
line. The applicant shall provide an inspection schedule, and shall file copies of inspections with the 
Inspector of Buildings. 

6. License and Permits: The operator ofevcry wireless communications facility shall submit to the 
Inspector of Buildings copies of all licenses and permits required by other agencies and governments 
with jurisdiction over the design, construction, location and operation of said facility, and shall 
maintain such licenses and permits and provide evidence of renewal or extension thereof when 
granted. 

7. Removal: All structures associated with a wireless communications use shall be removed within 
one (1) year of the cessation of said use. If applicable, an annual certification demonstrating 
continued compliance with the standards of the Federal Communications Commission, Federal 
Aviation Administration and the American National Standards Institute, including provisions for 
required maintenance, shall be filed with the Inspector of Buildings by the permit holder. 

8. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for a wireless communications use, the applicant shall 
post and submit a bond or other financial surety acceptable to the Town in an amount sufficient to 
cover the cost of demolishing and/or removing the facility in the event the Inspector of Buildings 
condemns the property or deems it to have been abandoned or vacant for more than one year. Said 
amount shall be certified by an engineer, architect or other qualified professional registered to 
practice in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the event the posted amount does not cover the 
cost of demolition and/or removal, the Town may place a lien upon the property covering the 
difference in cost. 

9. Modifications: The Permit Granting Authority may modify any provision of these standards if 
it can be demonstrated that it is technically infeasible to meet said standards or conditions, or that 
their effect is to prohibit the proposed use throughout the town, or if such modification will promote 
use of existing buildings or structures, co-location of wireless communications uses, improved safety 
or design, or otherwise promote the purposes of this by-law. 

1 0. Amateur Radio Facilities: The Board of Appeals may issue a special permit for an amateur radio 
facility (tower or antenna) subject to the following requirements: 

a. The application shall include a site plan showing the dimensions of the lot upon which the 
amateur tower is to be erected; the location of the tower base, and a notation as to the height 
of the tower; distances to property lines; the location of any anchor guys; and such other 
reasonable information as the Board may require to properly review the application. The 
applicant shall submit information giving the specifications for the tower materials and 
details for footing and guying. 

b. The height of an amateur radio tower, inclusive of its appurtenant devices, shall not exceed 
one hundred ( 1 00) feet, and no dish antenna may be mounted on an amateur radio tower. 

c. For purposes of public safety an amateur radio tower may not be erected nearer to any 
property line than a distance equal to the vertical height of the tower inclusive of any 
appurtenant devices measured from the base of the tower. 

d. A ground mounted amateur radio tower shall be located in the rear yard only. A tower or 
antenna affixed to a residential structure shall be located on the side or rear of such structure. 

e. In order to provide for visual buffering the Board may require fencing or vegetative 
screening at the base of an amateur radio tower. 

f. For purposes of safety the Board may require a fence or locked gate surrounding the base of 

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ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 



431 



an amateur radio tower of height determined by the Board to be sufficient to restrict 
unauthorized access. 

g. No portion of an amateur radio tower shall be utilized as a sign or have signage attached to 
it. 

h. An amateur radio tower shall be dismantled by the applicant if: 

(1) The use of the tower and its devices is discontinued for a period of two (2) years; or 

(2) The Inspector of Buildings determines the tower to be structurally unsound and a 
danger to life and limb. 

i. A special permit for an amateur radio tower is not transferable. Within one hundred twenty 
(120) days of the transfer of the lot upon which the tower is situated, the new owner shall 
cither apply for a new special permit or dismantle the tower. 

t 

(3) Delete Section IV.B.50. of the Zoning By-Law in its entirety and replace with the following: 





Residence 1 Business 1 Industrial i 


SRA I SRB I SRC 1 APT 1 LS 1 1 OP 1 GB 1 MU 


IG 


IA 


ID 1 


50. Wireless Communications Facility 
as defined in Section IL25. subject to 
the provisions of Section VLN. of 
the zoning by-law 


BA 


BA 


| BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


50(a) Amateur Radio Facilities 
subject to the provisions of 
Section VLN. 10. of the zoning 
by-law 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA~ 


50(b) Tower or antenna for 
commercial communications 
purposes subject to height, 
setback, design and review 
standards of Section VI.N.1. 
through 9. of the zoning by-law 


N 


N 


1 N 


N 


BA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 



or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 47 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

The following amendments were MOVED and seconded: 

Amendment I: 

Revise Item 1. Setback and Height: distance at least equal to three times their height in lieu of 

one and one-half. 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendment 2: 

Revise item 2h. to read:...access by public. No barbed wire fencing will be acceptable. Access to 
pole shall be by cherry picker only to limit inviting unauthorized access. 



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432 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendment 3: 

Revise item 2i. To read:. ...shall not be artificially lighted. If lighting is required, lighting shall not 
be visible from ground level. Provide light shielding or baffling us required to eliminate light 
spread on or within setback distances. 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendment 4: 

Revise item 21. To read: properly review the application. The plans shall indicate all property 

abutters within 3 00 feet of the site line as mandated by Massachusetts General Law 40 A Section 1 1 . 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendments: 

Add item 2m. To read: Towers equipped with generators shall be reviewed by a Sound Consultant 
hired by the Applicant. A certified report assuring acceptable noise levels based on the proposed 
installation shall be submitted with the application. 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendment 6: 

Revise item 3c. To read: non-residential districts. Applicant shall be prepared to submit more 

than one option based on the above. The Town will have an independent Radio Frequency Engineer 
review optional proposed location to determine its necessity. The town will have the option of back 
charging the applicant for the associated fees. 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

Amendment 7: 

Add item 9 A. To read. The Applicant shall not add equipment to an existing tower without 
reapplying for the additions and submitting revised emission levels below current safety guidelines. 

Motion passed by a Majority vote. 

It was VOTED to approve Article 47 as amended. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 
the following by-law: 

"Section 1: Purpose 

The purpose of this bylaw is to protect the wetlands, related water resources, and adjoining land 
areas in the Town of Andover by controlling activities likely to have a significant or cumulative 
effect upon the important public values of those areas, which include, without limitation, the 
following: public or private water supply, groundwater supply, flood control, erosion and 
sedimentation control, storm damage prevention, protection of surrounding land and other homes 
or buildings, prevention of pollution of groundwater and surface water, fisheries, wildlife habitat, 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 433 

agriculture, recreation, and the historic and natural scenic character of wetland resource areas, 
watercourses, lakes and ponds (collectively, the "values protected by this bylaw"). 

Section 2: Jurisdiction 

Except as permitted by the Conservation Commission or as provided in Section 3 of this bylaw, 
no person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise alter the following resource 
areas: any bank, freshwater wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, swamp, venial pool, reservoir, lake, 
pond, creek, river or stream, or any land under said waters, or any land within 1 00 feet of any of the 
aforesaid resource areas, or any land subject to Hooding or inundation by groundwater or surface 
water, or within 200 feet of any river (collectively, the "resource areas protected by this bylaw"). 

Section 3: Exceptions 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for maintaining, repairing 
or replacing, but not substantially changing or enlarging, an existing and lawfully located structure 
or facility used in the service of the public and used to provide electric, gas, water, telephone, 
telegraph and other telecommunication services, provided that written notice has been given to the 
Commission prior to the commencement of the work, and provided that the work conforms to 
performance standards and design specifications in any regulations adopted by the Commission. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for work performed for 
normal maintenance or improvement of land in agricultural use, provided that written notice has 
been given to the Commission prior to commencement of work, and provided that the work 
conforms to performance standards and design specifications in regulations adopted by the 
Commission. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not apply to emergency projects 
necessary for the protection of the health and safety of the public, provided that the work is to be 
performed by or has been ordered to the performed by an agency of the Commonwealth or a political 
subdivision thereof; provided that advance notice, oral or written, has been given to the Commission 
prior to commencement of work or within 24 hours after commencement; provided that the 
Commission or its agent certifies the work as an emergency project; provided that the work is 
performed only for the time and place certified by the Commission for the limited purposes 
necessary to abate the emergency; and provided that within 21 days of commencement of an 
emergency project a permit application shall be filed with the Commission for review as provided 
by this bylaw. Upon failure to meet these and other requirements of the Commission, the 
Commission may, after notice and a public hearing, revoke or modify an emergency project approval 
and order restoration and mitigation measures. 

The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for work performed more 
than 25 feet away from any bank, freshwater wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, swamp, vernal pool, 
reservoir, lake, pond, creek, river or stream, or any land under said waters or any land subject to 
flooding or inundation by groundwater or surface water, and which is performed in connection with 
the ordinary maintenance or improvement of a single- or two-family house lawfully in existence on 
January 1, 1998, including building additions and the conversion of lawn to accessory uses such as 
decks, sheds, patios and pools. This exception shall not apply work performed in the Fish 
Brook/Haggetts Pond Watershed Protection Overlay District unless the work is performed more than 
50 feet away from the resource areas listed above. 

Other than stated in this section, the exceptions provided in the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. 
c. 131 § 40, and Regulations, 3 1 CMR 10.00, shall not apply under this bylaw. 

Section 4: A pplications for Permits and Requests for Determination 

Written application shall be filed with the Commission to perform activities affecting resource 
areas protected by this bylaw. The permit application shall include such information and plans as 
are deemed necessary by the Commission to describe proposed activities and their effects on the 
resource areas protected by this bylaw. No activities shall commence without receiving and 
complying with a permit issued pursuant to the bylaw. 

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434 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

The Commission in an appropriate case may accept as the permit application and plans under 
this bylaw the Notice of Intent and plans filed under the Wetlands Protection Act, G.L. c. 1 3 1 , § 40, 
and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

Any person desiring to know whether or not a proposed activity or an area is subject to this 
bylaw may in writing request a determination from the Commission. Such a request for 
determination shall include information and plans as are deemed necessary by the Commission. The 
Commission may determine that a proposed activity or an area is not subject to this bylaw subject 
to the observance of conditions by the applicant. 

Section 5: Fees 

Section 5.1: Administrative Fee 

The Commission is authorized to include in any regulations adopted under this bylaw a fee 
schedule imposing fees for permits, determinations and certificates of compliance, provided that 
no such fee schedule shall go into effect until it is first approved by the Andover Finance 
Committee. Such fees must be based on a reasonable estimate of the actual costs incurred by the 
Commission in carrying out its duties under this bylaw, taking into account any fees provided 
under the Wetlands Protection Act. Failure to pay any fee required by regulations duly 
promulgated by the Commission shall be grounds for denial of the application. 

Section 5.2 Consultant Fees 

The Commission is authorized to require the applicant to pay the reasonable costs and expenses 
borne by the Commission for specific expert engineering and consulting services deemed 
necessary by the Commission to review any application. The maximum consultant fee to be 
charged shall be according to the following schedule: 



Project Cost 


Maximum Fee 


UP TO $250,000 


NO FEE 


$250,001 to $500,000 


$2,500 


$500,001 to $1,000,000 


$5,000 


$1,000,001 to$ 1,500,000 


$7,500 


$1,500,001 AND ABOVE 


$10,000 



The project cost means the estimated, entire cost of the project including, without limitation, 
building construction, site preparation, landscaping, and all site improvements, but excluding 
land acquisition. Projects shall not be segmented to avoid being subject to a consultant fee. The 
applicant shall submit estimated project costs at the Commission's request. Consulting services 
may include, without limitation, the delineation and survey of wetland resource areas, analysis 
of resource area values, hydrogeological and drainage analyses, evaluation of wildlife habitat, 
and legal services. The Commission is authorized to charge the applicant for said fee based upon 
its reasonable finding that the additional information acquirable only through outside consultants 
would be necessary for the making of an objective decision, and when the application or request 
for determination proposes any of the following: 

(a) the alteration of more than 500 square feet or more of any land under a water body or 
bordering vegetated wetlands; 

(b) the alteration of 50 linear feet or more of the bank of any water body or waterway; 
© the alteration of five thousand (5000) square feet or more of the buffer zone; or 

(d) the creation or evaluation of any point source discharge, detention or retention basin, water 
control structure or wetland replication area; 

(e) that the Commission make a determination of the boundary line of any resource area 
pursuant to a request for determination of applicability. 



■152- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 435 

Said fee may be requested of the applicant within thirty (30) days of the filing of the application, 
or from the last amendment thereto. In its request, the Commission shall identify the consultant 
it has selected and include an estimate of the charges for the proposed services. The applicant 
may appeal from the selection of the consultant to the Board of Selectmen within ten (10) days 
of receiving notice from the Commission of the same. The Selectmen may set aside the selection 
of the consultant only if the consultant lacks sufficient qualifications to perform the work or has 
a conflict of interest. 

The Commission shall comply with the applicable competitive bidding requirements set forth 
in G.L. c. 30B before engaging a consultant under the provisions of this section. 

If a revolving fund for consultant expenses and fees is authorized by town meeting vote, or by 
any general or special law, the applicant's fee shall be put into such revolving fund and the 
Commission may draw upon that fund for specific consultant services approved by the 
Commission at one of its public meetings. Any unused portion of said fee shall be returned to 
the applicant. 

Section 5.3 Waiver/Non- Applicability of Fees 

No application or consultant fees shall be due from the Town of Andover in connection with any 
project performed by the Town or on its behalf, or from any person having no financial 
connection with a property which is the subject of a request for determination. 

Section 6: Notice and Hearings 

Any person filing a permit application or a request for determination with the Commission at the 
same time shall give written notice thereof, by certified mail (return receipt requested) or hand 
delivered, to all abutters at their mailing addresses shown on the most recent applicable tax list of 
the assessors. The notice to abutters shall enclose a copy of the permit application or request, with 
plans, or shall state where copies may be examined and obtained by abutters. An affidavit of the 
person providing such notice, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, shall be filed with the 
Commission. When a person requesting a determination is other than the owner, the request, the 
notice of the hearing, and the determination itself shall be sent by the Commission to the owner as 
well as to the person making the request. 

The Commission shall conduct a public hearing on any permit application or request for 
determination, with written notice given at the expense of the applicant, not less than five business 
days prior to the hearing, in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town of Andover. 

The Commission shall commence the public hearing within 2 1 days from receipt of a completed 
permit application or request for determination unless an extension is authorized in writing by the 
applicant. 

The Commission shall issue its permit or determination in writing within 21 days of the close 
of the public hearing thereon unless an extension is authorized in writing by the applicant. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine its hearing under this bylaw with the 
hearing conducted under the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 1 3 1 , § 40, and Regulations, 3 1 CMR 
10.00. Notice of a hearing so combined shall not be considered defective solely because it fails to 
make reference to this bylaw. 

The Commission shall have authority to continue the hearing to a date certain announced at the 
hearing, for reasons stated at the hearings, which may include receipt of additional information 
offered by the applicant deemed necessary by the Commission in its discretion, or comments and 
recommendations of the boards and officials listed in Section 9. In the event the applicant objects 
to a continuance or postponement, the hearing shall be closed and the Commission shall take action 
on such information as is available. 

Section 7: Burden of Proof 



■153- 



436 ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by a preponderance of the credible evidence that 
the work proposed in the permit application will not have unacceptable significant or cumulative 
effect upon the values protected by this bylaw. Failure to provide adequate evidence to the 
Commission supporting this burden shall be sufficient cause for the Commission to deny such permit 
or to grant a permit with conditions. 

Section 8: Permits and Conditions 

If, after said hearing, the Commission determines that the activities which are subject to the 
permit application are likely to have a significant or cumulative effect upon the values protected by 
this bylaw, the Commission, within 21 days of the close of the public hearing or such further time 
as the Commission and the applicant shall agree on, shall issue or deny a permit for the activities 
proposed. If it issues a permit, the Commission shall impose conditions which it deems necessary 
or desirable to protect those values, and all work shall be done in accordance with those conditions. 

The Commission is empowered to deny a permit for failure to meet the requirements of this 
bylaw; for failure to submit necessary information and plans requested by the Commission; for 
failure to meet the design specifications, performance standards, and other requirements in 
regulations of the Commission; for failure to avoid orprevent unacceptable significant or cumulative 
effects upon the values protected by this bylaw; and where no conditions are adequate to protect 
those values. Due consideration shall be given to any demonstrated hardship on the applicant by 
reason of denial, as presented at the public hearing. 

Lands within 200 feet of rivers, and lands within 100 feet of other resource areas, are presumed 
important to the protection of these resources because activities undertaken in close proximity to 
resource areas have a high likelihood of adverse impact upon the wetland or watercourse, either 
immediately, as a consequence of construction, or over time, as a consequence of daily operation or 
existence of those activities. In addition, such areas are often vital to the preservation of species that 
depend on wetlands for food or reproduction. The Commission may therefore require that the 
applicant maintain a continuous strip of continuous, undisturbed vegetative cover within the 200-foot 
[or 100-foot] area, unless the applicant demonstrates that the area or part of it may be disturbed 
without harm to the values protected by this bylaw. 

In reviewing proposed activity in areas within 200 feet of rivers, no permit issued hereunder shall 
permit any activities unless the applicant, in addition to meeting the otherwise applicable 
requirements of this bylaw, has proved by a preponderance of the evidence that (1) there is no 
practicable alternative to the proposed project with less adverse effects, and that (2) such activities, 
taking into account proposed mitigation measures, will have no significant impact on the values 
protected by this bylaw. The Commission shall regard as practicable an alternative which is 
reasonably available and capable of being done after taking into consideration the proposed use of 
the property, the overall project purpose (e.g., residential, institutional, commercial, or industrial 
purpose), logistics, existing technology, and costs. 

To prevent wetlands loss, the Commission shall require applicants to avoid wetlands alteration 
wherever feasible, to minimize wetlands alteration, and where alteration is unavoidable, to 
incorporate mitigation measures into the project design. 

A permit shall expire three years from the date of issuance. Notwithstanding the above, the 
Commission in its discretion may issue a permit of unlimited duration for recurring or continuous 
maintenance work, provided that annual notification of time and location of work is given to the 
Commission. Any permit may be renewed once for one or more additional one year periods, 
provided that a request for a renewal is received in writing by the Commission prior to expiration. 

For good cause the Commission may revoke or modify a permit or determination issued under 
this bylaw after notice to the holder of the permit or determination, notice to the public, abutters, and 
town boards, pursuant to Section 5 and 6, and a public hearing. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine the permit or determination issued under 
this bylaw with the Order of Conditions or Determination of Applicability issued under the Wetlands 
Protection Act, G.L. c. 131, § 40, and Regulations, 310 CMR 10.00. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 437 

No work proposed in any permit application shall be undertaken until the permit issued by the 
Commission with respect to such work has been recorded in the Registry of Deeds or, if the land 
affected is registered land, in the registry section of the land court for the district wherein the land 
lies, and until the holder of the permit certifies in writing to the Commission that the permit has been 
recorded. 

Section 9: Coordination with Other Boards 

Any person filing a permit application or request for determination of applicability shall give 
notice thereof by certified mail or hand delivery to the Planning Board, the Board of Health and 
Board of Selectmen. If a permit is required from the Board of Appeals, the applicant shall also 
furnish a copy to that Board. 

The Commission shall, to the extent practicable, coordinate with any other Board reviewing the 
project, and having similar authority to recover its consulting fees from the applicant, in an effort 
to avoid duplication of consulting services. 

Section 10: Security 

As part of a permit issued under this bylaw, the Commission may require, in addition to any 
security required by any other town or state board, commission, agency or officer, that the 
performance and observance of the conditions imposed hereunder be secured wholly or in part by 
one or more of the methods described below: 

(a) by a proper bond or deposit of money or negotiable securities, sufficient in the opinion 
of the Conservation Commission to secure performance of the conditions and observance of the 
safeguards of such permit, to be released upon the issuance of a certificate of compliance for 
work performed pursuant to the permit; or 

(b) by a conservation restriction, easement, or other covenant enforceable in a court of law, 
executed and duly recorded by the owner of record, running with the land to the benefit of the 
Commission whereby the permit conditions shall be performed and observed before any lot may 
be conveyed other than by mortgage deed. 

Section 1 1 : Regulations 

The Commission shall promulgate after due notice and public hearing Rules and Regulations to 
effectuate the purposes of this bylaw. Failure by the Commission to promulgate such rules and 
regulations or a legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall not act to invalidate or 
suspend the effect of this bylaw. 

Section 12: Enforcement 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise alter resource areas 
protected by this bylaw, or cause, suffer, or allow such activity to continue or allow such fill or other 
alteration to be left in place, without the required authorization pursuant to this bylaw. 

The Commission, its agents, officers, and employees shall have authority, with prior approval 
from the property owner or pursuant to court process, to enter upon privately owned land for the 
purpose of performing their duties under this bylaw and may make or cause to be made such 
examinations, surveys, or sampling as the Commission deems necessary. 

The Commission shall have authority to enforce this bylaw, its regulations, and permits issued 
thereunder by violation notices, administrative orders, and civil and criminal court actions Any 
person who violates provisions of this bylaw may be ordered to restore the property to its original 
condition and take other action deemed necessary to remedy such violations. 

Upon request of the Commission, the Town Manager and Town Counsel, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, may take legal action for enforcement under civil law. Upon request of the 
Commission, the chief of police may take legal action for enforcement under criminal law. 

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438 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

Municipal boards and officers, including any police officer or other officer having police powers, 
shall have authority to assist the Commission in enforcement. 

Any person who violates any provision of this bylaw, or regulations, permits, or administrative 
orders issued thereunder, shall be punished by a fine of not more than S300. Each day or portion 
thereof during which a violation continues, or unauthorized fill or other alteration remains in place, 
shall constitute a separate offense, and each provision of the bylaw, regulations, permit, or 
administrative order violated shall constitute a separate offense. 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution in a specific case, the Commission may issue citations 
under the non-criminal disposition procedure set forth in G. L. c. 40, § 2 ID. 

Section 14: Relation to Wetlands Protection Act 

This bylaw is adopted under the Home Rule Amendment of the Massachusetts Constitution and 
the Home Rule statutes, independent of the of the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 131, § 40, and 
regulations, 310 CMR 10.00, thereunder. 

Section 15: Severability 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this bylaw shall not invalidate any other section or 
provision thereof, nor shall in invalidate any Order of Conditions which has previously become final. 

Section 16: Effective Date 

This bylaw shall take effect as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 32, and shall apply 
to any activity described herein which occurs after its effective date, except that this bylaw shall not 
apply to any activity described in a Notice of Intent filed with the Conservation Commission under 
the Wetlands Protection Act on or before the date of its adoption by Town Meeting vote, provided 
that such activity is subsequently approved in a final Order of Conditions of Determination of 
Applicability issued under the said Act. 

Section 17: Definitions 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and implementation of this bylaw. 

Abutter - the owner of any land within 1 00 feet of the property line of the land where the activity 
is proposed, as determined by the most recent assessors' records, including any land located directly 
across a street, way, river, stream, or pond. 

Alter - to change the conditions of any area subject to protection by this bylaw and shall include 
but not be limited to one or more of the following actions upon areas described in this bylaw: 

(a) the removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, gravel or aggregate material of any kind; 

(b) the changing of pre-existing drainage characteristics, flushing characteristics, salinity 
distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns and flood storage retention areas; 

© the drainage, disturbance or lowering of the water level or water table; 

(d) the dumping, discharging or filling with any material which could degrade the water quality; 

(e) the driving of piling, erection of buildings or structures of any kind; 

(f) the placing of any object or obstruction whether or not it interferes with the flow of water; 

(g) the destruction of plant life, including the cutting of trees; 

(h) the changing of water temperature, biochemical oxygen demand and other natural 
characteristics of the receiving water; 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28, 1998 439 

(i ) any activities, changes or work which pollutes any body of water or groundwater; 

(j) the application of pesticides or herbicides. 

Cumulative effect - an effect that is significant when considered in combination with other 
activities that have occurred, are going on simultaneously, or that are likely to occur, whether such 
other activities have occurred or are contemplated as a separate phase of the same project, such as 
the build-out of a subdivision or an industrial park, or unrelated but reasonably foreseeable actions, 
including other development projects that are currently under construction, under review or that may 
be expected to come forward. 

Freshwater wetland, marsh, wet meadow, bog, or swamp - includes any area bordering a water 
body, or, if not bordering a water body, consisting of at least five thousand (5000) square feet, where 
surface or ground water, or ice, at or near the surface of the ground support a plant community 
dominated (at least 50 per cent) by wetland species. 

Groundwater - all subsurface water contained in natural geologic formations or artificial fill, 
including soil water in the zone of aeration. Activities in or within 100 feet of resource areas shall 
not significantly alter the existing quality or elevation of naturally-occurring ground water. 

Person - any individual, group or individuals, association, partnership, corporation, business 
organization, trust, estate, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts when subject to town bylaws, any 
public or quasi-public corporation or body when subject to town bylaws, or any other legal entity, 
including the Town of Andover or its legal representative, agents or assigns. 

Private water supply - any source or volume of surface or ground water demonstrated to be in 
private use or shown to have potential for private use, including ground or surface water in the zone 
of contribution around a private well. Activities in or within 100 feet of a resource area shall not 
have a significant effect on the quality of a private water supply. 

Public water supply - any source or volume of surface or ground water demonstrated to be in 
public use or approved for water supply pursuant to G.L. c. 11 1, § 160 by the Department of 
Environmental Protection Division of Water Supply, or demonstrated to have a potential for public 
use, in addition to all surface and ground water in zones of contribution. Activities subject to the 
Commission's jurisdiction under this Bylaw shall not have a significant effect on the quality of a 
public water supply. 

Wildlife habitat - an area that provides breeding and nesting habitat, shelter, food and water to 
animal species. Includes areas identified as containing rare, threatened or endangered species as 
listed by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program. Structures and activities in any resource area 
shall not have a significant adverse effect on wildlife habitat. 

Except as otherwise provided in this bylaw or in regulations of the Commission, the definitions 
of terms in this bylaw shall be as set forth in the Wetlands Protection Act, G. L. c. 131, § 40, and 
regulations, 310 CMR 10.00, thereunder." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that Article 48 be approved as printed in the 
warrant with the following amendments: 

SECTION 3 

Move to amend Section 3 of the proposed General Bylaw for Wetland Protection by 
inserting, between the fourth and fifth paragraphs, the following paragraph: 

"The application and permit required by this bylaw shall not be required for the maintenance 
and repair of buildings, other structures, driveways, roads, parking areas, drainage structures and 
basins, lawns or athletic fields in existence on January 1 , 1998, provided that such work is conducted 
in conformity with any general guidelines or performance standards which the Conservation 

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440 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

Commission may, be regulation, adopt to protect the interests identified in Section 1 of this Bylaw." 

SECTION 16 

Move to amend Section 16 of the proposed General Bylaw for Wetland Protection by 
inserting, after the words "this bylaw shall not apply to any activity described in a Notice of Intent," 
the words "or Request for Determination of applicability". 

SECTION 5.1 

Move to amend Section 5.1 of the proposed General Bylaw for Wetland Protection by 
deleting the words, "provided that no such fee schedule shall go into effect until it is first approved 
by the Andovcr Finance Committee". 

SECTION 5.2 

Move to amend Section 5.2 of the proposed General Bylaw for Wetland Protection by 
deleting the words "Board of Selectmen" and "Selectmen", and inserting the words "Town Manager" 
in the third paragraph. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to amend the amendment in the original 
motion to Section 3 by inserting the words "improvements including" before the word "buildings" 
in the second line of the amendment.. 

The amendments APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to amend the amendment in the original 
motion to Section 16 by inserting the words "as of January 1, 1998" after the words "Notice of 
Intent" and inserting the words "as of January 1, 1998: after the words " Request for Determination 

of Applicability". 

The second motion was WITHDRAWN 

Article 48 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 250 NO: 338 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 
Conservation Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 44 Section 53E'/2 for the purpose of establishing a Conservation Commission 
revolving account for Fiscal Year 1 999 for expenses to be paid for consultants to review and provide 
comments on pending applications, and to ascertain compliance with outstanding permits or 
determinations, with such expenses to be funded by applicants, with any surplus fees for the cost of 
the consultant to be returned to the applicant, and to authorize the Town Manager to make 
expenditures in an amount not to exceed 550,000 for Fiscal Year 1999 or take any other action 
related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager and the Board of 
Selectmen to file special legislation for the establishment of a special account for fees collected for 
the employment of outside consultants by the Town Manager on behalf of the Conservation 
Commission to review applications or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 441 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of S 1 1 0,000 for the cost 
of constructing a sanitary sewer in Balmoral Street between York Street and the Shawsheen River 
bridge, and to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain. Betterments are to be assessed. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$1 10,000 for the purpose of constructing a sanitary sewer in Balmoral Street, between York Street 
and the Shawsheen River Bridge, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7( 1 ) 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor, and further that the Selectmen arc hereby authorized to acquire the necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise, and provided further that 
betterments shall be assessed in accordance with applicable law. 

On petition of Robert and Kathy Deschene and others 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Health Department: Approval 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to authorize, but not require, the Town Manager and 
the Board of Selectmen to enter into an agreement or agreements with the City of Lowell, the Town 
of Tewksbury and the House of Atreus Realty Trust for the provision of sewage disposal service to 
Lots 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 25, 27 and 29 in the subdivision known as Crystal Circle as shown on 
Plans recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds Land Registration Office as Plans 
35859B and 35859C, on terms and conditions deemed by the Town Manager and Board of 
Selectmen to be in the best interest of the Town, including a term of up to 25 years or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell, Esq. and others 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to establish the following salaries for certain elected 
officials, effective July 1, 1999: 

Board of Selectmen 

Chairman $1,800.00 per year 

Member $1,500.00 per year 

School Committee 

Chairman $ 1 ,800.00 per year 

Member $ 1 ,500.00 per year 

Moderator 

Annual Meeting $250.00 

Special Meeting $60.00 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 53 be approved as printed in the 
warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

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442 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
S4000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special meetings 
of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from 
the resulting recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to be 
preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall be made available 
to the public as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 54 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$4000 for the first year's operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the Finance 
Committee of the Town of Andover, including executive sessions, shall be recorded officially in 
their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting 
recordings of which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to be preserved in 
perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and the transcripts shall be made available to the public 
as soon as possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 55 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 32, Section 
103 relative to the cost of living adjustment for retirees or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 56 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds 
and appropriate a sum not to exceed $400,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account for 
funding accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities payable upon retirement or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 57 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $400,000 from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, 
purchase or taking by eminent domain the property at 19 Pearson Street, shown on Assessors Map 
38, Lot 8, together with the improvements thereon for municipal purposes, and to raise by taxation, 
borrowing or transfer from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the 
sum of $1 80,000 for said acquisition and demolition or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that (I) the Board of Selectmen is hereby 
authorized to acquire by purchase, by gift, by eminent domain or otherwise, the property located at 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 443 

19 Pearson Street and shown on Assessor's. Map 38 as Lot 8 and (ii) that in connection with such 
acquisition, the sum of $180,000 is hereby appropriated, for the purpose of acquiring the 
aforementioned property for municipal purposes, including demolition and other costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3 ) 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAT A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of SI 00,000 for repairs 
to the Hussey's Pond Dam and River Street Bridge including costs for engineering services and the 
acquisition of any easements required in connection therewith, or any other costs incidental and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$1 00,000 for the purpose of making repairs to the Hussey's Pond Dam and the River Street Bridge, 
including the acquisition of any necessary easements and the payment of all costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7 
and 8 of the Massachusetts General Laws, and any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor, and that in connection with the projects authorized to be undertaken 
hereunder, the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
by purchase, by eminent domain or otherwise. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain, the real property at 35 Elm Street and to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum 
of $350,000 for the purpose of acquiring real property at 35 Elm Street and the construction of a 
municipal parking lot, including costs for land acquisition, engineering, construction, drainage, 
landscaping, pedestrian walkways or any other costs incidental or related thereto, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain or 
take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of $525,000 for the 
purpose of laying and relaying a new water main in Bumham Road and Dufton Road and for costs 
incidental and related thereto, including the acquisition of any easements required in connection 
therewith and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said easements by gift, purchase or 
eminent domain or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $525,000, 
for the purpose of laying a new water main in Bumham Road and Dufton Road and for the payment 

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444 ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 28. 1998 

of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Sections 7 and 8 of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

The following two amendments were MOVED and seconded: 

1 . That the recent resurfacing of Burnham Rd. will not be compromised by the installation of 
the new water main and that the road surface will be the same as it is now. 

2. Due to the heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic from High Street to the Penguin Park area, 
that the sidewalks on the east side of Bumham Road be rebuilt and curbstones installed. 

The amendments were WITHDRAWN. 

The original motion was APPROVED. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Andover 
by inserting in the appropriate place the following: 

1 . All articles in the warrant shall be numbered sequentially by the Board of Selectmen. At Town 
Meeting, the Town Clerk shall place all article numbers in a container. The Town Moderator 
shall draw a number and that article shall be presented to Town Meeting for action. Another 
number may not be drawn until Town Meeting has acted upon that article. 

2. Certain articles that are related to each other (or one another) - whereby passage of the particle 
is dependent upon the action of another article - shall be taken as one drawing for action. 

3. When the Budget (Omnibus) article is drawn, the order of consideration of said article shall be 
drawn from a second container, which shall contain function headings: Administration, Public 
Safety, Public works, Education, etc. 

4. During Town Meeting, after an article has been acted upon and prior to another number being 
drawn, any voter may move to consider any remaining article. This motion shall require a four- 
fifths vote of Town Meeting. 

5. Once an article has been drawn, any voter may move to postpone consideration to another time. 
Such motion shall require a two-thirds vote of Town Meeting. 

6. The official record of each Town Meeting shall report the articles in the order as printed in the 
warrant. 

On petition of John Doyle and others 

Article 62 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum of $375,000 for the 
purpose of replacing the two remaining pumps at the Fish Brook Water Pumping Station including 
mobilization, electrical work, installation of required piping and monitoring instrumentation and all 
necessary design and engineering services or take any other action related thereto. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 445 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$375,000, for the purpose of replacing the two remaining pumps at the Fish Brook Water Pumping 
Station, including design work, mobilization, electrical work, installation of required piping and 
monitoring instrumentation, and for the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that 
to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7 and 8 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $2,500,000 for the 
purpose of constructing or reconstructing sidewalks, including installing granite curbs and planting 
strips with trees, or any other costs incidental or related thereto and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase, or eminent domain or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 64 be approved as printed in the 
warrant in the amount of $400,000 from taxation. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A Majority Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the 
sum of $1,000,000 for the following Town projects: Storm Drainage Improvements; Landfill 
Closure; Aerial Mapping; Traffic Signals - Lovejoy Road/Dascomb Road Intersection - Engineering 
and Design; Town Capital Projects; Pomps Pond Improvements; New Ballfields - Engineering and 
Design; and Skateboard Park or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town approve a Skateboard Park in 
the amount of $45,000 from Free Cash. 

Upon motion made and seconded it was MOVED to amend the motion to add: " No money will be 
spent on converting and /or decommissioning and existing playing field." 

The amendment LOST by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn at 10: 1 5 P.M., until Wednesday, 
April 29, 1998 at 7:00 P. M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road to finish 
the rest of the motions to Article 64 any articles thereafter. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 403 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:02 P.M. 

A motion was made and seconded to accept M.G.L. c. 39, Sec. 15, as amended by the Acts of 1996 
to allow the Moderator to declare a 2/3 vote. 



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446 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 

The motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

By unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit six (6) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 65 CONTINUED from previous night's Town Meeting 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Storm Drainage 
Improvements in the amount of $300,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve money for Land Fill 
Closure in the amount of $125,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve an Aerial Mapping of 
the Town in the amount of $250,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve engineering and design 
plans for traffic signal improvements at Lovejoy and Dascomb Road in the amount of $ 1 2,000 from 
Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Town Capital Projects 
in the amount of $100,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Pomps Pond 
Improvements in the amount of $30,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve engineering and design 
plans for new ball fields in the amount of $138,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approved all motions except $138,000 for playing fields 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$1,500,000 for architectural/engineering fees associated with the preparation of plans and designs 
for additions, renovations, replacements or construction of the Public Safety Center, Police Station 
or Fire Station and cost related and incidental thereto or take any other action related thereto. 



WITHDRAWN 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15A, 
to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the "40-foot-Right-of-Way" at the end of 
West Knoll Road described in the Order of Taking dated July 31, 1967 and recorded with the Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1 087, Page 289 and shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land 
Prepared for the Town of Andover, Andover, Massachusetts, Scale 1" = 100', July 20, 1967, Harry 
R. Feldman, Inc., Surveyors", recorded with said Order of Taking from the School Committee to the 
Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant easements to affected abutters 
and to petition the Planning Board to approve said Right-of-Way as an allowed way for zoning and 
subdivision control purposes or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town vote, pursuant to General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 15A, to transfer the care, custody, management and control of a portion of the 
"40-foot-Right-of-Way" at the end of West Knoll Road described in the Order of Taking dated July 
31, 1967 and recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1087, Page 289 and 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land Prepared for the Town of Andover, Andover, Massachusetts, 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 447 

Scale 1 "=100', July 20, 1967, Harry R. Feldman, Inc. Surveyors", recorded with said Order of Taking 
from the School Committee to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
grant easements to affected abutters and to petition the Planning Board to approve said Right-of-Way 
as an allowed way for zoning and subdivision control purposes. The portion of the 40 foot Right-of- 
Way to be so transferred is described as follows: 

Commencing at the stone bound marking the northeasterly comer of West Knoll Road and running 
northeasterly along the southern property line of Kendrick (the northern line of the 40 foot wide 
right-of-way) a distance of 425 feet; thence southeasterly at a 90 degree angle to the northerly line 
of the right-of-way, a distance of 40 feet; and thence southwesterly along the southern line of the 40 
foot right-of-way back to the right-of-way line of West Knoll Road, said southern line being a 
distance of 40 feet from the northern line of the right-of-way and parallel thereto. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 



Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15A, 
to transfer the care, custody, management and control of the "40 Foot Right of Way" at the end of 
West Knoll Road described in the Order of Taking dated July 31,1 967, and recorded with the Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds at Book 1087, Page 289, and shown on a Plan entitled, "Plan of 
Land Prepared for the Town of Andover, Andover, Massachusetts; Scale i" = 100'; July 20, 1967, 
Harry R. Feldman, Inc., Surveyors," recorded with said Order of Taking, from the School Committee 
to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant easements to affected 
abutters for legal frontage and access according to the Town's zoning and subdivision regulations 
and to petition the Planning Board to approve said Right of Way as an allowed way solely "for 
school purposes", as stipulated in the aforesaid Order of Taking, dated July 31, 1967. 

On petition of Charles and Suzanne Kendrick and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
$2,956,000 for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to various 
School buildings or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$750,000, for remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to various school 
buildings and for the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A) the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: DECLARED UNANIMOUS BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $768,000 
for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing, constructing or making extraordinary repairs 
including site work at the Andover High School or take any other action related thereto. 

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448 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
5768,000, for remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to the Andover High 
School including but not limited to: window replacement and installation; reconstruction of the 
running track at Lovely Field; the installation of window shades in the field house; furnishings and 
equipment, and for the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3 A) the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Upon motion made and seconded it was it was MOVED to amend Article 70 by replacing the motion 
with the following: "To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed 
S768,000 for the purpose of replacement and installation of windows at Andover High School, 
reconstruction of the running track at Lovely Field and installation of window shades in the Field 
House. 

Upon discussion the motion was WITHDRAWN. 

The original motion was APPROVED. 

VOTE: YES: 332 NO: 14 A 2/3 Vote Required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Section 32(a) of the General By- 
laws to insert after the word "charges" in line 7 the words "including amounts assessed under the 
noncriminal disposition provisions of Article I, Section 4," 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 71 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will vote to require that all current and overdue property tax 
liens, including interest and fines, must be paid to the Town Treasurer/Tax Collector before the sale 
or transfer of any tax-delinquent real estate property can be finalized. 

On petition of Joseph E. O'Brien and others 

Article 72 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



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ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 449 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to prohibit any sub-dividing of tax-delinquent property 
until all of its current and overdue tax liens, including interest and fines, are paid in full. 

On petition of Joseph E. O'Brien and others 

Article 73 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 32 of the General By-laws by 
substituting the words "shall deny, revoke, or suspend building permits" (for property-tax 
delinquency) in place of the words "may revoke, deny, or suspend building permits." 

On petition of Joseph E. O'Brien and others 

Article 74 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town and change 
Section 8, Article C of the BallardVale Historic District By-law to read as follows: 

"In order for an application for any certificate to be reviewed at the next regularly scheduled 
monthly meeting, the application must be filed a minimum of fourteen days prior to said meeting 
date. At that meeting, the Commission shall be required to determine whether the application 
involves any exterior architectural features which are within the jurisdiction of this by-law." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court to enact legislation establishing the Andover Link To The Future Corporation or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Michael H. Miller and others 

WITHDRAWN 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for the 
purpose of funding the establishment and operation of the Andover Link To The Future Corporation 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Michael H. Miller and others 

WITHDRAWN 



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450 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 

ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and/or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate the sum of S 1 00,000 to be used for a site location study and conceptual design 
and planning, and publishing a design Rf P for a multi-level parking garage. The location at the rear 
of the Town parking lot located on Main Street shown as Lot 127 on Assessors Map 55 and shown 
on a sketch prepared by D.R. Viehmann on file at the Town Offices is recommended as first choice. 

On petition of Norman Viehmann and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town vote to raise by transfer from 
Free Cash and appropriate the sum of S40.000 to be used for a comprehensive study oflhc present 
and future parking needs for the Downtown locale, such study to include site locations, conceptual 
designs and planning and publishing a design RFP for parking facilities and other possible solutions 
to address said parking needs. 

Article 78 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the division and sale for business 
development, approximately 20,000 square feet more or less of Town-owned parking lot located on 
Main Street between Olde Andover Village and House-of-Clean, shown as a portion of Lot 127 on 
Assessors Map 55, and shown on a sketch prepared by D.R. Viehmann on file at the Town Offices, 
for the purpose of Downtown business development, and to transfer the control from Selectmen for 
municipal purposes to the Selectmen for purposes of sales, and to authorize the Town Manager and 
Selectmen petition the General Court for special legislation for such a division and sale or transfer 
and for such a change of use to take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Norman Viehmann and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 80. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, taxation and/or by transfer from 
available funds and appropriate the sum of $4,200,000 to be used with other funds to be provided 
by gift, grant or otherwise for detailed design, construction and landscaping of; a multi-level parking 
garage for 400 or more cars on Town property located at the rear of 83-87 Main Street or such other 
location as determined by the site location and conceptual design study authorized by Article 78. 

On petition of Norman J. Viehmann and others 

WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 81. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 

the following by-law: 

"(a) Purpose : The Town has experienced severe problems with persons discharging stink bombs, 
smoke bombs and silly string and other aerosol products in and around the Andover Public 
Schools and in and around public ways of the Town. School days have been disrupted due 
to the discharge of these products in the schools. Stink bombs, smoke bombs, silly string 
and other aerosol products are causing a deterioration of the aesthetics of the community. 
The public safety, health and welfare are adversely affected by the discharge of stink bombs, 
smoke bombs, silly string and other aerosol products at parades and other public gatherings. 
It is the purpose and intent of this Bylaw to eliminate the adverse secondary effects caused 
by these products, with those secondary effects having been clearly confirmed by reports 
given by public school and safety officials, which have been relied upon in the enactment of 
this By-law. 



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ANNUM, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 451 

(b) Definitions: 

Silly String - an aerosol devise that upon discharge, emits a string like substance. 

Smoke Bomb - a chemical bomb that upon detonation discharges smoke. 

Stink Bomb - a chemical bomb that upon detonation emits a foul odor. 

© ) The sale, distribution and discharge of stink bombs, smoke bombs and aerosol silly string 
products within the Town of Andovcr arc prohibited. 

(d) This By-law shall not apply to public safety personnel in the conduct of their duties." 

or to take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 81 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 82. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the sum of $7,500 
for the July 4, 1998 fireworks or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 82 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant in the amount of $7,500 from Free Cash. 

At this point in the meeting the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen asked the Moderator for a break 
in the meeting to recognize Jerry Silverman for his eighteen (18) years of faithful and dedicated 
service as Selectman in the Town of Andover. Mr. Silverman was not present at the meeting And 
a gift was presented to his wife, Myma, in his honor. 

Article 82 was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 83. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $100,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on Chestnut Street 
from Upland Road to Highland Street, and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required for this 
sidewalk; or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Emilie E. Gilbert and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve $10,000 from Free 
Cash for sidewalk design and engineering costs related to adding an additional sidewalk to Chestnut 
Street from Upland Road to Highland Road by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 84. To see if the Town will vote to raise, by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $40,000 
total for the extension of a sanitary sewer line to 14 Rock O'Dundee Road. Betterments to be 
assessed. 

On petition of Francis W. Robinson and others 

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452 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate a sum of S40,000 
from available funds for the extension of a sanitary sewer line to 14 Rock O'Dundcc Road. 
Betterments to be assessed. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 85. To see if the Town will appropriate $5,000.00 from available funds for the 
installation of an in-ground irrigation system for BallardVale Green, or take any other action relating 
thereto. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate $5,000.00 from 
available funds to install an in-ground irrigation system for BallardVale Green, or take any other 
action relating thereto by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 86. To see if the Town will vote to permit the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
agreements with other cities or towns to form sister-city relationships. The purpose of the 
agreements will be to encourage opportunities for governmental, cultural, academic and athletic 
community exchanges to enrich the lives of Andover residents. In order to develop these sister-city 
relationships, the Town Meeting further recommends that the Board of Selectmen take an active role 
in supporting these exchanges by encouraging municipal departments, residents and active Town 
groups to form an association. A member of the Board of Selectmen will become a liaison to the 
association's board so that the Town can actively participate in the welcoming of sister-city 
exchanges. 

On petition of Judith A. Goonyep and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 86 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 87. To see if the Town will vote to: 

(a) transfer custody and control of the Board of Selectmen to abandon all of the Town's right, title 
and interest in and to a portion of certain drainage easements which arc located on Lot 8 off William 
Street and described in a written easement from Carmelina M. Gneco, Edna Grieco Thomas and 
Richard N. Grieco to the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover dated March 31, 1972 and duly 
recorded with Essex North District Deeds in Book 1 191, Page 625 and shown on the following 
plans: (I ) a Plan entitled, "Plan Showing Proposed Drainage Easement on Land of Carmelina M. 
Grieco, Edna Grieco Thomas, Richard N. Grieco, Andover, Mass." Scale 1 " = 80', dated January, 
1972 and recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6588; and (ii) a plan 
entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. entitled William Street Lot Layout Plan" dated 
February 14, 1994 Scale 1" = 40' and recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
12416. Said abandonment shall be upon the following conditions: (I) that prior to the abandonment 
of the easement the Selectmen accept the grant of the drainage easement referred in section (b) of 
this article; and (ii) that prior to the abandonment of the easement the owner of said property relocate 
or reconstruct portions of existing drain pipes within the easement area to be abandoned to the new 
easement described in section (b) to the satisfaction of the Andover Department of Public Works. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 453 

(b) authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant of easement for drainage purposes over Lot 
8 off of William Street, said easement shown as a "Drainage Easement" on a plan of "Easement in 
Andover, Mass., Owner J and V Nominee Trust dated January 19, 1998, Scale 1" = 20' to be 
recorded and is further described as follows: 

A Drainage Easement over Lot 8 William Street, Andover, Ma owned by J and V Nominee 
Trust, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Easement in Andover, Mass. dated January 19, 1998 and 
prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc." Beginning at a stone bound on the northerly sideline of 
William Street, 152.28 feet west of the southeasterly corner of Lot 8 as shown on N.D.E.R.D. Plan 
No. 1 24 1 6; thence N 1 3-25-30 W a distance of 1 0.00 feet to a point; thence N 58-30-52 U a distance 
of 94.35 feet to a point; thence N 71-39-33 E a distance of 60.00 feet to a point at land of Joanne 
Jawitz; thence N 1 6-57-00 W by said land of Joanne Jawitz a distance of 39.79 feet to a point; thence 
S3 4-21-35 W a distance of 32.64 feet to a point; thence S 71-39-33 W a distance of 38.24 feet to 
a point; thence S 58-30-52 W a distance of 135.87 feet to a point; thence N 86-53-03 W a distance 
of 75.57 feet to a point; thence N 06-48- 1 2 W a distance of 1 20.3 1 feet to a point; thence N 1 0-1 3-14 
E a distance of 93.83 feet to a point on the southerly terminus of Yale Road; thence S 65-48-44 W 
along said terminus of Yale Road and by land of Frank and Claire Severin a distance of 24.24 feet 
to a point; thence S 10-13-14 W a distance of 83. 13 feet to a point; thence S 06-48-12 E a distance 
of 123.41 feet to a point, thence S 76-02-45 W a distance of 17.23 feet to a point at land of Julie S. 
Springwater; thence S 55-04-33 E by said land of Julie S. Springwater a distance of 26.55 to a point; 
thence N 76-02-45 E a distance of 7. 09 feet to a point; thence S 86-53-03 E a distance of 102.49 feet 
to a point on the northerly sideline of William Street; thence in an easterly direction and curving to 
the right along an arc of a curve having a radius of 185.00, a distance of 31.13 along the northerly 
sideline of William Street to the stone bound at the point of beginning. 

(c) or take any other action relation thereto. 

On petition of Mark B. Johnson, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 87 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 124 NO: 52 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 88. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law in Section III, 
District Boundaries (and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, 
Massachusetts) to rezone to Industrial A District (IA) from Industrial D District (ID) those certain 
parcels of land situated on the southerly side of Dascomb Road, being bounded by said Dascomb 
Road, Interstate Rte. 93 and the Tewksbury-Andover Town Line, said parcels of land being shown 
as Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Town of Andover Assessor's Map 203. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 88 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 136 NO: 33 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 89. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant 
of land for purposes of expanding the existing layout of a portion of Haverhill Street, at no cost to 
the Town, which layout expansion involves a strip of land on the north side of Haverhill Street 
totaling approximately 2,129 square feet and approximately shown on a Plan of land entitled 

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454 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 

"Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts prepared for: Marriott Senior Living 
Services" dated September 25, 1997, prepared by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB); the final 
layout to be depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable to 
the Board; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 89 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 90. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding 
the following by-law: 

"I. Preamble 

The intent of this bylaw is to establish a system which fairly and impartially regulates retail 
transactions of a pawnbroker or a second-hand dealer for the purpose of: 

a) Identifying stolen property unintentionally received by the regulated parties; and 

b) Detention of regulated parties intentionally transacting business in stolen property. 

II. Definitions 

Second-Hand Dealer - shall mean any person, firm, partnership or corporation whose business is the 
retail buying, selling, buy-back, exchanging, dealing in or dealing with second-hand articles 
including but not limited to jewelry, watches, diamonds or other precious stones or gems, gold silver, 
platinum or other precious metals, musical instruments and equipment, cameras, furs, small 
collectible antiques, home and auto stereo equipment, compact discs, cassette tapes, televisions, 
VCR's, tools, computers and computer equipment, firearms, auto accessories, sporting equipment 
and collectibles. Mail order transactions or retail stores that exchange or provide cash or credit for 
returned articles shall not be included within these definitions. 

Pawnbroker - shall mean any person, firm, partnership or corporation engaged in the business of 
lending money secured by taking possession of jewelry, wearing apparel, household goods or other 
personal property, with the right to sell the personal property if it is not redeemed. A person firm, 
partnership or corporation shall be deemed to be a pawnbroker whether the transaction takes the 
form of a loan by the pawnbroker secured by the property or a sale to the pawnbroker with the rights 
to repurchase within a stated period of time. 

Customer - shall mean any person who sells, exchanges or otherwise transfer a second-hand article 
to a second-hand dealer; or any person who receives a loan from a pawnbroker secured by personal 
property or sells personal property to a pawnbroker with a right to repurchase within a stated period 
of time. 

Minor - shall mean any person under the age of eighteen (18) years of age. 

III. Licensing Procedure 

A. No person, firm, partnership or corporation shall operate, conduct or engage in business as 
a second-hand dealer/pawnbroker unless such person, firm, partnership or corporation shall first 
obtain a license from the Board of Selectmen or their designee, i.e. Chief of Police. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29. 1998 455 

B. Applications for new licenses and renewal licenses for a second-hand dealer/pawnbroker 
shall be made in writing to the Town Clerk on forms provided for this purposes by the Town of 
Andover. Each application will be reviewed by the Chief of Police or his designee and approved by 
the Board of Selectmen. Each issued license and applicable licensing requirement shall be issued 
on a location specific basis. No such license shall be issued to any person, form or corporation who 
has in the last ten years been convicted of receiving stolen property or who has repeatedly violated 
ordinances, bylaws or statutes of this state or any other state or territory related to the business 
license in this state or any state or territory. Refusal of a license shall be based on just cause. 

C. Upon approval, a license shall be issued and continue in force until May 1st next following 
unless sooner revoked. Each license fee and renewal fee shall be $50.00. Said license may not be 
assigned or transferred and will be clearly and prominently displayed. 

D. A second-hand dealer may apply for a waiver of the licensing requirements hereunder. The 
Board of Selectmen or their designee, i.e. Chief of Police, may grant such waiver if it is determined 
that the applicant is in a business which (a) receives its stock-in-trade from charitable donations; or 
(b) is a business the nature of which is not susceptible to the purchase and resale of stolen property. 

Applications for waivers shall be made in writing to the Police Department on forms provided 
for this purpose by the Town of Andover and shall be renewed on a yearly basis on such terms and 
conditions as the Town shall mandate. 

IV. Purchasing from Minors 

A. No second-hand dealer/pawnbroker, nor any person employed by the second-hand 
dealer/pawnbroker, shall directly or indirectly purchase any aforementioned article from anyone 
under 18 years of age, knowing or having reason to believe him or her to be such except when said 
minor is accompanied by a parent or legal guardian who shall sign the transaction record in person 
before said dealer. 

V. Records. Inspections. Re-Sale. Changes. Alterations 

A. Every second-hand dealer/pawnbroker, upon the acquisition of any aforementioned article, 
shall prepare transaction records upon forms approved by the Town of Andover stating the full 
name, ID number, date of birth, telephone number and address of the seller, date of the transaction 
and full, legible, accurate and detailed description (to include make, model and serial number) of 
each article. Dealer shall attach a photocopy of the identification to the form along with the seller's 
signature. A photocopy of the article, if required by the nature or the size of the item, will also be 
attached to the form. These forms shall be delivered to the commanding officer of the Detective 
Division of the Andover Police Department every business day before the hour of 10:00 A.M. 

The commanding officer of the Detective Division will designate an officer of his command who 
will review each police report received listing lost/stolen property and also ensure that a report is 
received from all junk, precious and/or old metals and second-hand articles, shopkeepers/dealers for 
the purpose of identifying any article that is like or similar to one which has been reported lost or 
stolen. Should this situation occur, a "stop order" shall be issued by the Chief of Police or his 
designee, to the shopkeeper/dealer prohibiting the resale of the particular article(s) until it can be 
determined whether the particular piece(s) is in fact that which has been reported lost/stolen. If it 
is determined that the particular article is not reported lost/stolen, the "stop order" shall be lifted 
forthwith. 

B. Jewelry, watches, diamonds or other precious stones or gems, gold, silver, platinum or other 
precious metals or items by virtue of their size shall be photocopies by use of a document copier. 

C. Positive identification in the form of a government photo ID shall be required of the seller 
and the type of identification used shall be photocopied. This shall not apply with a transaction 
between second-hand dealers/pawnbrokers as herein defined. 

D. Said dealer shall retain copies of purchase records in his possession which, together with any 
article listed therein, may be inspected at any time by any duly authorized Andover police officer 

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456 ANNUA!, TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 

during regular business hours while making all reasonable efforts not to disrupt the normal course 
of business. 

All transaction records shall be kept by said second-hand dealers/pawnbrokers for a minimum 
of seven years. 

No article shall be sold, encumbered by sales contract or otherwise disposed of or altered in its 
appearance within fifteen days of purchase unless the second-hand dealer is granted permission in 
writing from the Chief of Police but in any case not within twenty-four (24) hours of time of 
purchase. Pawnbrokers shall retain non-perishable articles for at least four months and perishable 
articles for one month. 

VI. Removal of Articles by Police Officers 

A. If the Andover Police Department determines that an article is needed for evidence in a 
criminal investigation, the Police Department shall seize that evidence pursuant to applicable 
criminal procedures. The second-hand dealer/pawnbroker shall be issued a receipt for the article. 

B. The Andover Police Department shall keep seized articles under the court's direction as long 
as necessary to permit the article to be used as evidence. At the conclusion of all court proceedings 
or closure of the police investigation, the Police Department shall notify the original owner, the 
second-hand dealer/pawnbroker and any person who may have a lawful interest that the property will 
be released in thirty (30) calender days to the original owner if no other claim is placed on the 
property. 

VII. Penalties 

A. Any violation of this chapter shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding $200.00 per day. 

B. The Chief of Police may suspend or revoke said license for just cause. Said action will be 
stayed if an appeal is filed. 

C. Any suspension or license revocation by the Chief of Police may be appealed by the licensee 
to the Board of Selectmen. That appeal must be made within ten (10) business days from the date 
of action by the Chief of Police." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 90 be approved as printed in the 
Warrant with the following amendments: 

Amend Section V. A., Records. Inspections. Re-Sale. Changes. Alterations , by deleting the last 
sentence of paragraph one and replacing it with the following sentence: " The prior day's forms shall 
be delivered to the Andover Police Department every business day before the hour of 10:00 A.M., 
in person or by fax; 

Amend the words in the third paragraph of Section V. D. by adding "or his designee" after the words 
"Chief of Police"; 

And by amending Section II., Definitions, Second-Hand Dealer, by adding the words " purchased 
by the second-hand dealer or any person so employed at the place of business described on the 
license issued by the Board of Selectmen as required by Section III of this bylaw" after the words 
"second-hand articles" in the second line of the proposed section. 

Article 90 was APPROVED as amended by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 91. To determine if the Town of Andover will vote to accept and name as a public way 

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ANNUAL TOWN MELTING - APRIL 29. 1998 457 

Noel Road as shown on a Plan approved by the Andovcr Planning Board entitled "Hyatt Crossings" 
and recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan number 12277 dated July 
1993. 

On petition of Hills-Mor Construction Company, Inc. and others 



NOT LAID OUT 



ARTICLE 92. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in laying out 
as a public way under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
designated as Paddock Lane and approve the Drainage Easements and Water Easements as shown 
on the plans provided. Copies of the following plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as 
required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: "Street Acceptance Plan of Land in Andover, 
Massachusetts, Paddock Lane, Scale 1" = 40' date: August 21, 1996". 

On petition of North Andover Realty Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 92 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 93. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in laying out 
as a public way under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
designated as Warwick Circle and approve the Drainage Easements and Water Easements as shown 
on the plans provided. Copies of the following plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as 
required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: "Street Acceptance Plan of Land in Andover, 
Massachusetts, Warwick 
Circle, Scale 1" = 40' date: September 12, 1997". 

On petition of North Andover Realty Corp. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 93 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 94. To see if the Town will vote to accept "West Hollow" as a public street, including 
the fee of said street and all appurtenant easements, as more particularly shown on a plan entitled 
"Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, MA" prepared by Beals and Thomas, Inc. dated April 29, 
1994 and filed with the Land Court, a copy of a portion of which is tl led with Essex North Registry 
District of the Land Court as Plan 1462-1 1 and upon which Land Court plan West Hollow is shown 
as Lot 67. 

On petition of Irving E. Rogers, Jr. and other others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 94 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 95. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name David Drive as a public way and 

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458 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 

authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, otherwise any fee, 
easement or other interest in land known as David Drive as shown on a plan entitled Pendleton 
Estates, prepared by Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., dated August 1975, said plan being 
recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 7863, and on file in the Office of the 
Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said 
acquisition, and to appropriate and raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or 
any combination thereof a sum of 560,000.00 for required engineering services, legal services, 



repairs and improvements to David Drive and expenses incidental thereto, or take any action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Joan Green and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 95 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: DECLARED MORE THAN A 2/3 VOTE BY MODERATOR A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 96. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Deca Circle as shown on 
a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. entitled "The Brownwoods", owner and 
applicant Deca Corporation, 175 Kendall Road, Tewksbury, Mass. Merrimack Engineering 
Services, 66 Park Street, Andover, Massachusetts, 01810, dated May 29, 1992, which plan is 
recorded in Essex North District Registry of Deeds as plan number 12228 and also at Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in plan book 125 as plan 70. 

On petition of DECA Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 96 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Panning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 97. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood Lane, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & 
Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover 
Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 98. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazelwood Circle, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & 
Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover 
Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which plan is recorded with the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 459 

ARTICLE 99. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Buttonwood Drive, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & 
Applicant Wyncrest Development Corp. 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover 
Consultants, Inc. 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass." which plan is recorded with the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 100. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board and entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant 
Wyncrest Development Corp. 1 08 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor Andover Consultants, 
Inc. 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass." which plan is recorded with the Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 101. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Radcliffe Drive, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 102. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Yardley Road, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and ethers 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 103. To petition the Town to accept as a public way Devonshire Plan as shown on a plan 
entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Devonshire Place, Andover, Mass., Scale 1 " = 40' date: July 
13, 1995, Andover Consultants, Inc." which plan is recorded at the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 12706. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 103 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 104. To petition the town to accept as a public way Lenox Circle as shown on a plan 
entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan, Devonshire Place, Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 40' date: July 
13, 1995, Andover Consultants, Inc." which plan is recorded at the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 12706. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell, Esq. and others 

-177- 



460 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 29, 1998 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 104 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority 
vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 10:40 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



^aaJa/^na^aviL/ 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



-178- 



SEPTEMBER 15, 1998 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY TOTAL: 3,640 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 



4bi 



GOVERNOR 

Brian J. Donnelly 
Scoll Harshbarger 
Palncia McGovern 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Dorothy A. Kelly Gay 
Warren E. Tolman 
All Olners 
Blanks 
Total 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Lois G. Pines 
Thomas F Reilly 
All Others 
Blanks 
Tolal 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

William Francis Galvin 

All Others 

Blanks 

Tolal 

TREASURER 

Shannon P. O'Bnen 
All Others 
Blanks 
Tolal 

AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinr. 


41 


42 


53 


51 


39 


46 


21 


40 


172 


159 


I87 


154 


154 


143 


136 


194 


262 


270 


241 


225 


201 


241 


201 


263 





2 


1 


2 











2 


18 


14 


13 


13 


11 


7 


8 


13 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


174 


160 


179 


152 


130 


153 


122 


153 


173 


208 


187 


183 


173 


187 


146 


209 








1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


146 


119 


128 


108 


101 


96 


97 


147 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


221 


212 


212 


195 


159 


189 


168 


247 


225 


236 


252 


225 


22G 


228 


179 


230 


1 





1 


1 











t 


46 


39 


30 


24 


20 


20 


19 


28 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


299 


326 


323 


290 


268 


294 


233 


333 





2 





2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


194 


159 


172 


153 


136 


140 


131 


178 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


292 


328 


330 


290 


258 


295 


236 


320 





2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


201 


157 


164 


154 


146 


141 


129 


191 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


293 


324 


319 


284 


257 


294 


227 


317 





1 





1 


3 








2 


200 


162 


176 


160 


145 


143 


139 


193 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 



TOTAL 

333 
1299 
1904 

7 

97 
3640 



1223 
1466 
9 
942 
3040 



1603 
1007 



226 
3640 



2366 

11 
1263 
3640 



2349 



1283 
3640 



2315 

7 
1318 
3640 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth District 
Martin T. Meehan 
All Others 
Blanks 
Tolal 



106 
493 



368 
4 

115 
487 



363 
3 
129 

495 



347 

7 

91 
445 



306 
2 

97 
405 



342 
2 

93 
437 



289 
5 
72 

366 



401 
4 

107 
512 



2802 
28 
810 

3640 



COUNCILLOR 

Fifth Distncl 
Palncia A. Dowling 
Michael K. Callahan 
Chnslopher T. Casey 
Mary-Ellen Manning 
John F McCarthy 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



182 
38 
20 
34 
87 
2 

130 
493 



178 
46 
14 
27 
117 
4 

101 
487 



184 
63 
18 
28 
104 
2 

96 
495 



198 
36 
11 
31 
87 
1 

81 
445 



150 
41 
14 
28 
80 
2 

90 
405 



176 
49 
14 
28 
74 
3 

93 
437 



165 
26 
15 
23 
46 
4 

87 
366 



192 
57 
18 
27 
89 
1 
128 
512 



1425 
356 
124 
226 
684 
19 
806 
3640 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

David O'Bnen 32 38 9 - 27 12 20 10 14 162 

Fredenck Simon 9 7 22 15 25 14 3 7 102 

Mary K. Small 12 13 7 

Susan C. Tucker 296 222 235 210 180 252 219 350 1964 

John V. Tudisla 000000000 

John J. "Jack - Wilson, Jr. 44 51 64 61 32 27 21 35 335 

All Others 1 3 1 1 4 6 3 19 

Blanks 110 164 163 128 152 124 107 103 1051 

Total 493 487 495 445 405 437 366 512 3640 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Seventeenth Essex District 
Barry R. FinegoW 339 

All Others 3 

Blanks 151 

Total 493 



355 


347 


308 





332 


280 


381 


2342 


9 


4 


9 





5 


2 


6 


38 


123 


144 


128 





100 


84 


125 


855 


487 


495 


445 





437 


366 


512 


3235 



P-5 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

Scott J. Consaul 0000 40 000 40 

Stephen B. Geary 00004400044 

William F. Martin. Jr. 55 55 

Rita M. Mercier 0000 16 000 16 

David M. Nangle 0000 17 000 17 

Karin Theodoras. 177 177 

All Others 000050005 

Blanks 0000 51 000 51 

Total 405 405 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Eastern District 
Kevin M. Burke 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



304 


318 


334 


285 


253 


1 


3 





1 


2 


188 


166 


161 


159 


150 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 



-1* 



236 


321 


2338 





1 


8 


130 


190 


1294 


366 


512 


3640 



462 

DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 



Precinct 1 Precmcl 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precmcl 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 



HERIFF 




















ssex County 




















eil J. Harrington 


117 


142 


129 


116 


105 


124 


86 


134 


953 


ohn J. Harty 


53 


64 


64 


68 


36 


63 


40 


52 


440 


lichael T. Phelan 


89 


96 


111 


92 


103 


85 


88 


105 


769 


ex Teixeira 


8 


17 


22 


16 


10 


17 


13 


25 


128 


II Others 





2 


2 


3 


1 








2 


10 


lanks 


226 


166 


167 


150 


150 


148 


139 


194 


1340 


otal 


493 


487 


495 


445 


405 


437 


366 


512 


3640 


OUNTY COMMISSIONER 




















ssex County 




















hnsiie Chns Ciampa. Jr. 


128 


153 


153 


157 


139 


148 


110 


148 


1136 


ames P. Mahoney 


120 


142 


143 


115 


84 


115 


93 


135 


947 


II Others 








1 


1 


3 





1 


1 


7 


lanks 


245 


192 


198 


172 


179 


174 


162 


228 


1550 



-180- 



46 J 



REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 15, 1998 



REPUBLICAN PARTY TOTAL: 1808 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


TOTA 


GOVERNOR 




















Argeo Paul Celluci 


120 


126 


122 


119 


100 


104 


87 


125 


903 


Joseph D Malone 


86 


117 


107 


115 


118 


114 


98 


124 


879 


All Others 





1 


1 





1 





4 


3 


10 


Blanks 


1 


3 


7 





1 


1 


1 


2 


16 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 




















Janet £ Jeghelian 


93 


115 


96 


116 


119 


112 


100 


125 


876 


Jane Mana Swift 


97 


113 


116 


103 


82 


92 


77 


110 


790 


All Others 





1 





2 














3 


Blanks 


17 


18 


25 


13 


19 


15 


13 


19 


139 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 




















Brad Bailey 


164 


171 


168 


171 


158 


170 


142 


177 


1321 


All Others 





7 


3 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


20 


Blanks 


43 


69 


66 


62 


61 


46 


46 


74 


467 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 


SECRETARY OF STATE 




















Dale C. Jenkins, Jr. 


158 


173 


160 


166 


154 


158 


134 


176 


1279 


All Others 


1 





1 


1 


1 


2 





1 


7 


Blanks 


48 


74 


76 


67 


65 


59 


56 


77 


522 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 


TREASURER 




















Robert A. Maginn 


167 


166 


160 


161 


155 


159 


131 


171 


1270 


All Others 





1 


1 











1 





3 


Blanks 


40 


80 


76 


73 


65 


60 


58 


83 


535 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 


AUDITOR 




















Michael T. Duffy 


163 


157 


157 


163 


152 


154 


130 


174 


1250 


All Others 





1 





1 





1 


1 





4 


Blanks 


44 


89 


80 


70 


68 


64 


59 


80 


554 


Total 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
Fifth District 

David E. Coleman 154 

All Others 

Blanks 53 

Total 207 



166 


156 


162 


149 


153 


129 


165 


1234 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


7 


79 


80 


71 


70 


65 


61 


88 


567 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 



COUNCILLOR 

Fifth District 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



5 


. 4 


5 


3 


4 


6 


7 


3 


37 


202 


243 


232 


231 


216 


213 


183 


251 


1771 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

Kevin C. Anderson 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Seventeenth Essex District 
Salim (Sal) R. Tabit 164 

All Others 

Blanks 43 

Total 207 



150 


163 


151 


155 


149 


156 


132 


157 


1213 


9 


10 


6 


6 


6 


6 


2 


18 


63 


48 


74 


80 


73 


65 


57 


56 


79 


532 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 


190 


254 


1808 



171 


165 


167 





158 


129 


177 


1131 


2 


2 


1 





1 


2 


1 


9 


74 


70 


66 





60 


59 


76 


448 


247 


237 


234 





219 


190 


254 


1588 



P-5 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 
Karen Simao 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 












156 











156 



































64 











64 











220 











220 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Eastern District 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



2 


7 


2 


1 


2 


5 


205 


240 


235 


233 


218 


214 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 



2 


6 


27 


188 


248 


1781 


190 


254 


1808 



SHERIFF 

Essex County 
Frank G. Cousins, Jr. 
Charles J. Chisholm 
Theodore E. Harvey 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



121 


126 


135 


126 


108 


125 


23 


30 


28 


24 


29 


19 


20 


36 


34 


32 


36 


29 











1 








43 


55 


40 


51 


47 


46 


207 


247 


237 


234 


220 


219 



106 


120 


967 


29 


29 


211 


27 


40 


254 


1 





2 


27 


65 


374 


190 


254 


1808 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Essex County 

Timothy F. Sullivan 157 

All Others 

Blanks 50 

Total 207 



159 


157 


156 


143 


152 124 


170 


1218 


1 





1 





1 


2 


5 


87 


80 


77 


77 


66 1 Ol 66 

21 gJLOJl- 190 


82 


585 


247 


237 


234 


220 


254 


1808 



REFORM STATE PRIMARY 



SEPTEMBER 15, 1998 
REFORM PARTY TOTAL: 1 



Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



GOVERNOR 




















All Others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 




















All Others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 




















All Others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 


SECRETARY OF STATE 




















All Others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 


TREASURER 




















All Others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 


AUDITOR 




















All others 





























Blanks 























1 


1 


Total 























1 


1 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth District 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 

COUNCILLOR 

Fifth District 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
Second Essex & Middlesex District 
All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Seventeenth Essex District 
All Others 

Blanks 

Total 

P-5 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 
All others 

Blanks 

Total 



















































1 


1 























1 


1 












N/A 























N/A 








1 


1 




















1 


1 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 




















Eastern District 




















All Others 

Blanks 

Total 







































1 
1 




1 

1 


SHERIFF 




















Essex County 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 







































1 
1 




1 
1 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER 




















Essex County 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 







































1 

1 




1 
1 



-182- 



STATE ELECTION 



4b3 



NOVEMBER 3. 1998 
TOTAL: 11,969 



GOVERNOR & 
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Celluci and Swift 

Harshbarger and Tolman 

Cook and Israel 

Pal McGovem 

All Others 

Blanks 

Tolal 



Precmcl 1 Precincl 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precmcl 7 Precmci 8 



693 
639 

26 

1 
9 
1368 



842 
626 

27 



2 

18 
1515 



767 
610 

24 





10 
1411 



895 
568 

19 

1 

17 
1500 



1076 
547 
29 



2 

7 
1661 



961 
538 
13 





825 
572 

14 



2 

12 
1425 



943 
589 

22 

2 
1 

12 
1569 



7002 
4689 
174 

2 

10 

92 
11969 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Brad Bailey 
Thomas F. Reilly 
Lois Pines 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



495 
791 



3 

79 
1368 



618 
837 



3 

57 
1515 



526 
831 



4 
50 
1411 



605 
818 



1 

76 
1500 



712 

891 

2 



56 
1661 



643 
822 


1 

54 
1520 



597 
760 



1 

67 
1425 



665 
837 



66 

1569 



4861 
6587 

2 

14 
505 
11969 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

William Francis Galvin 

Dale C. Jenkins, Jr. 

David L. Atkinson 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



789 
428 

48 


103 
1368 



827 
535 
57 

2 
94 
1515 



829 

454 

48 

3 

77 
1411 



817 
542 

48 


93 
1500 



829 
685 

54 
1 

92 
1661 



820 
574 

36 
1 

89 
1520 



765 
530 

46 
1 

83 
1425 



801 
615 

57 

2 

94 
1569 



6477 
4363 

394 
10 

725 
11969 



TREASURER 

Bob Maginn 
Shannon P. O'Brien 
Merlon B. Baker 
All Others 
Blanks 
Tolal 



562 
667 

36 



103 
1368 



657 
728 

36 
1 

93 
1515 



576 
699 

45 
1 

90 
1411 



687 
671 

30 



112 
1500 



848 
661 

42 



110 
1661 



747 
651 

36 



86 
1520 



640 
660 

30 



95 
1425 



745 
691 

38 



95 
1569 



5462 
5428 

293 
2 

784 
11969 



AUDITOR 

A. Joseph DeNucci 
Michael T. Duffy 
Carta A. Howell 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



696 
485 

56 



131 
1368 



781 
541 

90 



103 
1515 



777 
470 

69 
1 

94 
1411 



747 

586 

68 



99 
1500 



793 
674 

75 



119 
1661 



745 
600 
69 
1 
105 
1520 



698 
545 

72 



110 
1425 



751 
610 

89 

2 
117 
1569 



5988 
4511 

588 
4 

878 
11969 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth District 

Martin T. Meehan 911 941 904 910 981 932 903 

David E. Coleman 406 530 450 530 631 537 475 
All Others 2 

Blanks 51 44 55 60 49 51 47 

Total 1368 1515 1411 1500 1661 1520 1425 



922 


7404 


581 


4140 


3 


5 


63 


420 


1569 


11969 



COUNCILLOR 

Fifth District 
Patricia A. Dowling 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

Kevin C. Anderson 

Susan C. Tucker 

Fred Simon 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



873 

12 

483 

1368 



420 
909 



1 

38 
1368 



962 
15 
538 

1515 



520 

946 



1 

48 
1515 



878 
23 
510 
1411 



463 

916 





32 

1411 



931 

10 

559 

1500 



648 
1661 



520 


633 


937 


990 














43 


38 


1500 


1661 



930 

14 

576 

1520 



517 
963 





40 
1520 



902 


930 


7411 


7 


12 


101 


516 


627 


4457 


1425 


1569 


11969 



464 


548 


4085 


916 
1 


972 



7551 
1 


1 


2 


5 


41 


47 


327 


1425 


1569 


11969 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Seventeenth Essex District 

Barry R. Finegold 904 

Salim (Sal) R. Tabit 425 
All Others 

Blanks 39 

Total 1368 

P-5 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

David M. Nangle 

Karen Simao 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Eastern District 
Kevin M. Burke 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



946 


873 


910 





960 


934 


960 


6487 


533 


508 


564 





537 


455 


579 


3601 





1 


3 








1 


2 


7 


36 


29 


23 





23 


35 


28 


213 


1515 


1411 


1500 





1520 


1425 


1569 


10308 



629 

926 

4 

102 

1661 



629 

926 

4 

102 

1661 



921 


1044 


959 


996 


1064 


964 


930 


978 


7856 


5 


9 


12 


4 


6 


10 


7 


9 


62 


442 


462 


440 


500 


591 


546 


488 


582 


4051 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 


1661 


1520 


1425 


1569 


11969 



■183- 



STATE ELECTION 



SHERIFF 

Essex County 

Frank G. Cousins, Jr. 

Michael T. Phelan 

Bryan Dellolio 

Kevin Leach 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinc 


545 


646 


606 


527 


553 


540 


11 


17 


25 


103 


163 


107 





1 





182 


135 


133 


1368 


1515 


1411 



Precmcl 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 



666 
510 

14 
152 



158 
1500 



801 
512 
25 
147 
1 
175 
1661 



716 
488 

14 

128 
2 

172 
1520 



629 
500 
12 
132 
1 
151 
1425 



759 

477 

24 
133 



176 
1569 



5368 
4107 
142 
1065 

5 
1282 
11969 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Essex County 

James P. Mahoney 

Timothy F. Sullivan 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 

QUESTION #1 
YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Total 

QUESTION #2 
YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Total 

QUESTION «3 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Total 

QUESTION #4 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

Total 



573 


623 


578 


534 


534 


669 


623 


719 





2 


1 


1 


261 


221 


209 


246 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 


811 


910 


852 


935 


444 


490 


464 


498 


113 


115 


95 


67 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 


833 


894 


820 


923 


411 


508 


491 


474 


124 


113 


100 


103 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 


1103 


1238 


1137 


1280 


162 


166 


172 


136 


103 


111 


102 


84 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 


935 


1066 


964 


1039 


335 


375 


378 


403 


98 


74 


69 


58 


1368 


1515 


1411 


1500 



550 
862 



248 
1661 



1022 
548 
91 
1661 



967 
575 

119 
1661 



1419 
142 
100 
1661 



1132 
450 

79 
1661 



519 
757 

3 
241 
1520 



938 
510 
72 
1520 



894 
541 
85 
1520 



1303 
139 
78 
1520 



1043 
417 
60 
1520 



538 
672 

215 
1425 



926 
442 
57 
1425 



909 
453 

63 
1425 



1254 
115 
56 

1425 



1005 
366 
54 
1425 



518 


4433 


785 


5621 


3 


11 


263 


1904 


1569 


11969 


952 


7346 


562 


3958 


55 


665 


1569 


11969 


921 


7161 


561 


4014 


87 


794 


1569 


11969 


1378 


10112 


127 


1159 


64 


698 


1569 


11969 


1065 


8249 


452 


3176 


52 


544 


1569 


11969 



•184- 



QUESTION 1 
PROPOSED AMENDMENT 
TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the general court in joint sessions of the two houses on July 29, 1990 (yeas 127 - nays 65); 
and again on June 9, 1998 (yeas 149 - nays 41)? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed constitutional amendment would prohibit the state legislature from changing the base 
compensation received by members of the Legislature as of January 1, 1996. As of the first Wednesday 
in January of 2001, and every second year thereafter, the base compensation would be increased or 
decreased at the same rate as increases or decreases in the median household income for the 
Commonwealth for the preceding two-year period, as ascertained by the Governor. 

A yes vote would prohibit state legislature from changing their base pay and instead would adjust that 
pay according to changes in median household income. 

A no vote would make no change in the method for setting legislator's base pay. 



QUESTION 2 

LAW PROPOSED BY 

INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the house of 
Representatives before May 6, 1998? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would create a new voluntary system allowing candidates for state office who agree to 
campaign spending limits to receive a set amount of public funds for their campaigns, starting with the 
2002 election. The proposed law would also limit transfers of money from national political parties to 
state political parties for administrative, overhead, or party-building activities. It would also require 
candidates for state office who had raised or spent at least a set minimum amount in an election cycle to 
file their required campaign finance reports with the state electronically, and the public would have 
prompt electronic access to such reports. 

The new funding system would replace the existing system of limited public financing of campaigns for 
statewide office. To participate in the new system, a candidate would have to raise a minimum number of 
contributions from registered voters in the relevant district, as follows: 

Governor, 6000; Lt. Governor, Attorney General, or Treasurer, 3000: Secretary of State or Auditor. 
2000; Executive Councillor, 400; State Senator, 450; State Representative. 200. Such contributions 
would have to be between $5 and S100 and be collected during a limited period: for statewide candidates 
beginning on August 1 of the year before the election, for other candidates beginning on January 1 of the 
election year, and for all candidates ending on the last day to file nomination papers with the Secretary of 
State. 

For any election, a participating candidate could not accept contributions of more than SI 00 from any 
person or political committee and could not raise or spend any money other than these contributions and 
public funds. 

Candidates meeting all of these requirements would, subject to appropriation by the legislature, receive 
public funding in the primary and general elections. This would come from a new state Clean Elections 
Fund, consisting of amounts voluntarily contributed through the checkoff on the state income tax return, 
any amounts appropriated by the Legislature, and any money in the existing state election campaign 
fund. 

The chart below shows the amounts of public funds a candidate could receive in the primary and general 
elections. A candidate could raise and spend private contributions in order to bring his or her spending up 
to the spending limit shown below. 



■185- 



Office 


Primary 
Election: 
Public Funds 


Primary 
Election: 
Spending Limit 


General Election: 
Public Funds 


General Election: 
Spending Limit 


Governor 


$1,500,000 


$1,800,000 


$1,050,000 


SI. 200.000 


Lt. Governor 


$383,000 


$450,000 


$255,000 


S300.000 


Ally. General or 
Treasurer 


$360,000 


$450,000 


$240,000 


S300.000 


Secretary of 
State or Auditor 


$120,000 


$150,000 


$80,000 


$100,000 


Councillor 


$19,000 


$24,000 


$13,000 


$16,000 


Senator 


$43,000 


$54,000 


$29,000 


$36,000 


Representative 


$15,000 


$18,000 


$9,000 


$12,000 



A participating candidate running unopposed would receive only half the listed amount of public funds 
and could spend correspondingly less than a candidate with an opponent. All funds could be spent only 
for campaign purposes. Any unspent public funds from a primary or general election would have to be 
returned after that election. A participating candidate who violated the contribution or spending limits 
would have to return all public funds, become ineligible for further funds, and in some cases pay fines. 

Candidates who do not accept public funds would have to report any spending in excess of the limit 
shown above and could be fined for failing to do so. If such a non-participating candidate spent more 
than the limit, participating candidates in that race would immediately receive, and could spend, public 
"matching funds" equal to the amount of the excess spending. The total amount of public finding 
(including matching funds) a candidate could receive would be limited to twice the spending limit for 
that race. During the general election campaign, running mates for Governor and Lt. Governor would be 
treated as teams in order to determine the distribution of any matching funds. 

An individual or political committee's total in-kind contributions (such as goods and some services) to a 
participating candidate would be limited to $500 per election. Higher limits would govern political 
parties' in-kind contributions. Participating candidates could not accept more than a set amount in such 
contributions, ranging from $3,000 per election for Representative up to $35,000 for Governor. 

The expenditure, contribution, and public funding limits would be adjusted every two years for inflation. 
A special commission (including elected officials and private citizens) would be set up to meet every two 
years to review the system and recommend any needed changes. The state Director of Campaign Finance 
could issue regulations to interpret and enforce the proposed law. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the rest of the law would stay in 
effect. 

A yes vote would change the laws governing public financing of campaigns. 

A no vote would make no change in the laws governing public financing of campaigns. 



QUESTION 3 
LAW PROPOSED BY AN INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 6, 1998? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state income tax rate on interest and dividend income, which was 
12% as of September 1997, to whatever rate applies to Part B taxable income (such as wages and 
salaries), which was 5.95% as of September 1997. The change would take effect starting in tax year 
2000. 

Ayes vote would reduce the state tax rate for interest and dividend income. 

A no vote would make no change in the current state tax rate for interest and dividend income. 



-186- 



QUESTION 4 
REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by the House of Representatives on 
November 19, 1997 by a vote of 32 to 6? 

SUMMARY 

The law changes the state's electric utility industry. Starting in March 1998, instead of buying power 
from the utility that owns the power lines, customers may choose to buy power from separate generating 
companies competing with each other to sell power to be delivered by the existing utility. Customers not 
choosing a new competing generating company will be provided power by their existing utility under a 
transition rate for 7 years, starting from a rate 10% less than 1997 rates. By September 1999, rales lor 
such customers must be further reduced from 1997 rates (adjusted for inflation) by 5%. Subject to 
restrictions in the law, rates paid by such customers may be adjusted up or down if approved by the new 
stale Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE). 

The law lets a utility recover, from customers, previously incurred costs related to generating plants and 
contracts that have become uneconomical under competition. Utilities must first reduce such "transition 
costs" in all reasonable ways, which may include selling non-nuclear generating plants. DTE must 
approve such sales and the utility's way of financing transition costs, and DTE may limit which costs 
may be charges to customers. Public agencies may arrange the sale of special bonds to help a utility 
finance transition costs to provide savings to customers. 

Utilities claiming they cannot offer the required rate reductions must work with DTE to find all possible 
ways to do so. State tax revenues related to sales of power plants may be used, if found necessary by 
DTE and subject to legislative appropriation, to ensure that utilities provide the 15% rate reduction. 
Utilities must maintain discounts for low-income customers. 

DTE must issue consumer protection and related regulations related to energy sales and the law lets the 
state Attorney General enforce consumer protection laws and regulations against energy companies. To 
maintain reliability, DTE must set performance-based rates and service quality standards for electric and 
gas utilities. Utilities failing to meet the standards may be fined up to 2% of their annual revenues. 

Such utilities will not be allowed to cut staff levels unless either the relevant unions agree or DTE finds 
that the cuts will not lead to sub-standard service. Utility employees who are laid off due to the law will, 
if eligible for unemployment benefits, also be eligible for reemployment assistance benefits. 

If a generating plant loses value due to the law, the responsible company must pay the affected city or 
town until 2009 to offset lost property tax revenue. Cities and towns may set up power purchasing 
cooperatives for local customers. Businesses and other organizations may also set up cooperatives. A 
municipal lighting plant that chooses to sell power outside its own service area must compete with other 
generating companies within its service area. 

The law requires electric utilities to continue energy efficiency and demand management programs until 
2003 and directs DTE to ensure that such programs are cost effective. The law imposes a charge on 
electricity consumers to promote renewable energy projects and to help cities and towns pay to add 
pollution control equipment to existing trash-to-energy plants. By 2003, power supplies must provide an 
annually increasing percentage of power from new renewable sources, and fossil-fuel power plants must 
start to meet efficiency standards limiting pollution. The law ends the requirement that the state find a 
need for a proposed power plant but preserves environmental reviews. 

The law changes the state Department of Public Utilities to the new DTE , controlled by a 5-member 
commission with expertise on specified issues. The law gives the state Division of Energy Resources 
new duties related to energy restructuring, such as educating consumers and helping cities and towns. 



Ayes vote would continue the new law changing the electric utility industry. 
A no vote would undo these changes in the electric utility industry. 



-187- 






%&& 






DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1998 





ELECTED 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




William T. Downs, Ch. 


- 1999 


Eric Nadworny, Ch. 


- 1999 


John P. Hess 


-2001 


Frank Eccles 


-2000 


Brian P. Major 


-2000 


Timothy M. McCarron 


-2000 


Larry L. Larsen 


-2000 


Tina B. Girdwood 


-2001 


Lori A. Becker 


-2001 


Richard J. Collins 


-2001 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 


REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. 


-2001 


Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. 


- 1999 


Jason V. Fox 


-2000 


Joseph M. Gleason, Andover 


-2000 


Norma Villareal 


-2003 


Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 


- 1999 


James A. Cuticchia 


-1999 


Michael E. Condon, Methuen 


- 1999 


Hartley M. Burnham* 


-2001 


Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 


- 1999 


* Appointed by Commissioner 




Sean Neilon, Lawrence 


- 1999 


of Dept. of Comm. Affairs 




Mark Ford, No. Andover 


- 1999 


TOWN MODERATOR 




TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 



James D. Dohertv 



1999 



John H. Caswell -2001 

Edwin F. Reidel - 1999 

Virginia H. Cole - 2000 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 2000 

Joan M. Lewis - 2000 

John R. Petty - 2000 

Donna C. Ellsworth - 2000 

Dr. Eric Stubenhaus - 2000 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



■188- 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



Donald F. Schroeder, Ch. 


-2000 


Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2000 


Margaret I. Jurgen 


- 1999 


Paul Bevacqua 


-2001 


Donald W. Robb 


- 1999 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2001 


Joanne F. Marden 


-2000 


Peter F. Reilly 


- 1999 


Robert T. King 


- 1999 


Pamela H. Mitchell 


- 1999 


Cynthia Milne 


- 1998 


Associate Members: 




Thomas E. Fardy 


- 1998 


David W. Brown 


- 1999 


Richard D. Fox 


-2000 


Alan R. Shulman 


-2000 






Stephen D. Anderson 


-2001 






Lois Karfunkel 


-2000 


PLANNING BOARD 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Michael H. Miller, Ch. 


-2001 


Robert A. Pustell, Ch. 


-2000 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2002 


Donald D. Cooper 


- 1999 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2003 


Paul J. Finger 


-2001 


Susan A. Alovisetti 


-2000 


Thomas J. Murphy 


-2000 


Linn N. Anderson 


-1999 


Gail L. Ralston 


-2000 


Associate Member: 




Joyce J. Robinson 


- 1999 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2001 


Philip Sutherland 


-2001 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-1999 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2000 


Patricia H. Edmonds 


-2000 


Ann E. Constantine 


- 1999 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2001 


Norma A. Gammon 


-1999 


Thomas J. Swift 


-2001 


James S. Batchelder 


-2000 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2000 


Dennis Ingram 


-2001 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-1999 


Raymond H. Flynn 


-2001 


Maria A. Rizzo 


-2000 


John S. Sullivan - Emeritus 




BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 


-2000 


William Krajeski 


-2001 


Joseph I. Pelc 


-2001 


Archibald D. Maclaren 


-2000 


Dr. Daniel E. Coleman 


-1999 


John R. Petty 


-1999 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 


TOWLE FUND 




Ann E. Constantine 


-2001 


Phillip F. Sullivan 


-1999 


Susan W. Alovisetti 


-2001 


Ruth E. Westcott 


-2000 



Donald J. Harding -1999 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Joanne D. Dee 


-2000 


Carolyn Simko 


- 1999 


Wendell A. Mattheson 


-2001 



■189- 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


RETIREMENT BOARD 




John R. Dempsey. Ch. 


- 1999 


James Cuticchia, Ch. 


- 1999 


Annetta R. Freedman 


-2000 


Marianne O'Leary 


-2001 


Barbara Worcester 


-2000 


John C. Dohertv 


- 1999 


James M. Lyman 


- 1999 


James L. Edholm 


-2000 


Roger L. Jenkins 


-2001 


Rodney P. Smith 


Open 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 


John Zipeto, Ch. 


- 1999 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


- 1999 


Marcelle Gregg 


- 1999 


John A. Campbell 


- 1999 


Mark E. Efinger 


-2001 


John J. Lewis 


- 1999 


Sharon R. Mason 


-2001 


Harold W. Wright 


- 1999 


Barbara Rogers 


-2001 


John C. Doherty 


- 1999 


Robert Katz 


-2001 


Edward J. Morrissey 


- 1999 


Norma Villarreal 


-2001 


Edward Cole 


- 1999 



Susan W.Ratya -1999 

James M. Deyermond - 1999 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. SHAWSHEEN VILLAGE HISTORIC 

DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Raymond H. Flynn, Ch. - 2000 

James R. Sellers - 2000 

Christine E. Bobek -2001 

Robert A. Bramhall -1999 

Leslie A. Frost -1999 

Jude A. Curtis -2001 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



Dennis Ingram, Ch. 


-2001 


Diane R. Derby 


- 1999 


Ron Abraham 


-2000 


Bruce Taylor 


- 1999 


Sherron Heller 


-2001 


Perry M. Raffi 


-1999 


Christian Huntress 


-2000 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 


Michael Warshawsky, Ch. 


-2001 


Mark Walker 


-2001 


Olivia Scileppi 


-2001 


Paul A. Clinton 


-2000 


Neil R. Gordon 


-2000 


Timothy J. McCarron 


- 1999 


Yoang Hoon Jung 


- 1999 


Mark E. Van Doren 


- 1999 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2001 



INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Michael W. Morris, Esq., Ch. - 2000 
Dr. Thomas J. Swift - 2000 

John E. Shuman - 2001 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - 200 1 

DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 

Dr. Thomas J. Swift - 2000 

S. Joseph Hoffman - 2000 



Dorothy L. Bresnahan, 


Ch. 


- 1999 


Martin Epstein 




- 1999 


Oscar Rosenberg 




- 1999 


Paul J. Salafia 




-2000 


Paul L. Twomey 




- 1999 


Robert J. Schneider, M.D. 


-2001 


Arthur W. Smith 




-2000 


Deborah Silberstein 




-2001 


Elizabeth Tice 




-2001 


Maureen Jandovitz 




-2001 


Marlies Zammuto 




-2001 


Leo Doherty 




-2000 


Dorcen Correnti 




-2000 


ZeffMarusich 




-2000 


INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 





Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 



- 1999 



■190- 



SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 



SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 



Kathleen M. Hess 


-2000 


Paul Caselle, Ch. 


- 1999 


Win Ryan 


-2000 


John S. Bigelow 


- 1999 


Madhu Sridhar 


-2000 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2001 


Cynthia Milne 


-2000 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2000 


Sheila Doherty 


-2000 


Jovce M. Ritterhaus 


-2001 


Ruby Easton 


-2000 






David Reilly 


-2000 


YOUTH COUNCIL 




Stephanie Smith 


-2000 


Richard K. Yost 


- 1999 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2000 


Colleen Georgian 


- 1999 


SENIOR CENTER BUILDING COMM. 


VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 




Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2001 


John C. Dohertv 


- 1999 


Spencer Johnson 


-2001 






Frank Sherman 


-2000 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEME? T 


Doreen Correnti 


- 1999 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


- 1999 


Parke Sickler 


-2000 






Tim Sullivan 


-2001 


NORTHEAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 


Doreen LaConti 


- 1999 


Robert E. McQuade 


- 1999 


MERR. VALLEY REG. 


TRANSIT AUTHORITY 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. REP. 



Stephen L. Colyer -1999 



Stephen L. Colyer - 1999 



•191- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Animal Inspector 

Civil Defense Director 

Community Development & Planning Department 
Director of Health 
Director of Planning 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Director of Elder Services 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 



Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 
Brian J. Pattullo 

Everett F. Penney 

Stephen L. Colyer 

James A. Greer 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Richard J. Salenas 

Bruce P. Hale 

Jeanne M. Madden 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

William J. Krajeski 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John C. Doherty 

Harold J. Wright 

Christine L. Metzemaekers 

Candace Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Kenneth H. Parker 

John D. O'Donnell, Jr. 

Stephen J. George 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. Richard W. Enos 



Robert E. McQuade 

John F. Canavan, Jr 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 



■192- 



***************** 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 

Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Fire Department - Business 623-8466 

Police Department - Business 475-041 1 

Animal Control Officer 475-041 1 

Town Offices Switchboard 623-8200 

Fax Number 623-8221 

DCS Classes & Activities 623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 623-8350 

Memorial Hall Library 623-8400 

Senior Center 623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 623-8501 

Human Resources Office 623-8530 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.town.andover.ma.us 
Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 31,047 Square Miles: 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,600 (7.5%) controlled by Conservation Commission 
1,000(5%) owned by A.V.I.S. 
889 (4.5%) owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 



•193- 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held four 
weeks following the Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information: Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits 

Ballfield Permits & Rentals 



Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 

Liquor License 
Marriage License 
Open Air Burning Permit 
Smoke Detector Permit 
Street Opening Permit 
Town House Rental 

Zoning By-law Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 623-8450 
at Town House 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 



Building Division 



623-8301 



(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Health Division 623-8295 or 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Town Clerk's Office 623-8255 

Fire Department 623-8466 

Fire Department 623-8466 

Dept. of Public Works 623-8350 

Facilities Coordinator 623-6450 
at Town House 

Building Division 623-8301 or 
Board of Appeals Off. 623-8315 



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Andover's Tax Rate: 



$15.17 - Residential and Open Space 

$21.74 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

$16.72 - Equalized Tax Rate 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 623-8264 



Recycling: 



Curbside Pickup: Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, green & brown - 
newspapers, magazines, and steel & tin cans - crush/flatten) will be 
collected on the same day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin 
curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 

Recycling Information & Complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 

Recycling Site: Third Saturday of each month at West Middle School from 9:00 A.M. 

to 1 :00 P.M. Plastics (#1 & #2) and aluminum materials. 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 
year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: Vining Disposal at 1-800-432-9996 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: Highway Division at 623-8426 or 

Dept of Public Works at 623-8350 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 

their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



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HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 205 10 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 1852 

(508)459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 205 15 

(202)225-3411 

State Senator: 

Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

6 Farrwood Drive, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 4 1 6B, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1612 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

1 6 Balmoral Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 436, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

(617)722-2575 

David M. Nangle (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

43 Crowley Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 448, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

(617)722-2582 



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WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies, or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 





William T. Downs Reginald S. Stapczynski 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen Town Manager 



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Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name and Address (Optional) 
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